The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Der Westen -- October 05, 1879
    The Orphanage in Rosehill

    Our present orphanage is too small to take care of the constantly increasing needs of the German Catholics who desire to place motherless or fatherless children in our institution.

    Only three years ago it was necessary to erect a building to provide schoolrooms and dormitories--and this year a three-story building, 24x74 feet, was added. The lower floor contains the bakery and laundry, the second floor is used as a dormitory, and the upper floor is used as a drying room, etc. This building and other improvements cost about $4,000. In order to raise this sum, we appeal to philanthropic people of the community. On Wednesday, October 8, the annual festival is to be given at the orphanage. An extra train will leave the Milwaukee depot at Canal and Kinzie Streets, at 10:10 A.M., and will return at 5:45 P.M. Admission tickets are twenty-five cents, and if you hold the lucky number you will win a buggy. Railroad tickets cost forty cents.

    2

    As usual, ample entertainment will be provided. The children--under the direction of the sisters--will give recitations, songs, and stage performances, and the committee has made arrangements to serve lunch.

    A cordial invitation is extended in behalf of the orphans.

    Very respectfully,

    The Executive Board,

    L. Biehl, Secretary.

    Our present orphanage is too small to take care of the constantly increasing needs of the German Catholics who desire to place motherless or fatherless children in our institution. Only ...

    German
    II D 4, II B 1 c 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 29, 1879
    Rosehill Orphanage Will Be Rebuilt

    The rebuilding of the Rosehill Orphanage, which was destroyed by fire recently, was discussed at a meeting yesterday by priests and laymen of our seven Catholic parishes. The following clergymen were present: Reverends Fischer of St. Antonius Church, De Dycker of St. Michaels Church,....[seven names altogether] and Lorenz Biehl, secretary of the Orphanage, as well as Messrs. H. H. Heating....[three names] and others.

    Reverend De Dycker, president of the Orphanage, opened the meeting, and it was decided to start reconstruction immediately. The new building will be 120 by 50 feet, three stories high, and will be made of stone. Architects Paul Huber, Dillenburg, and Egan will draw the plans, which will be submitted for approval on Thursday, a week from tomorrow.

    How the money is to be raised was not decided--but the matter will be definitely regarded as of German concern. Sympathy has been manifested everywhere. The 2Vorwaerts-Turner [an association] and Mr. Bernhard Baum have offered the use of their halls for various entertainments.

    A general inspection after the fire showed that there was still shelter available for the children, also food, but there was a serious shortage of clothing and beds; the latter were all burnt. Shoes and boots are needed particularly. Donations of such articles will be appreciated. Nearly three-fourths of the children at the institution are boys.

    The rebuilding of the Rosehill Orphanage, which was destroyed by fire recently, was discussed at a meeting yesterday by priests and laymen of our seven Catholic parishes. The following clergymen ...

    German
    II D 4, II D 10
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 03, 1879
    The Orphanage in Rosehill

    A meeting was held at the Vorwaerts Turnhalle (Turner Hall), yesterday afternoon, to devise ways and means to help the Rosehill orphanage, since the orphanage was destroyed by fire some time ago. A fairly large number of Germans from the Southwest Side responded.

    Wilhelm Ruehl was named chairman, and Michael Sebastian secretary. The committee decided to give a concert on Monday, November 10, at the Vorwaerts Turnhalle. Fritz Knepper offered the hall without charge for the occasion. Various song clubs and individuals have offered to participate. The committee on refreshments also reported favorably. Aloys Wolf promised to supply all cigars which will be used on that day. The printers, Mueller, Wagner, and Umbdenstock will supply all printed matter free.

    On J. Roeder's motion, a committee was formed to arrange the concert. The 2members were: Reverend Kalvelage....[eight in all]. It was then decided to hold another meeting Friday evening, at eight o'clock, in the small assembly room of the Vorwaerts Turnhalle, to receive the reports of all committees, and everyone having the interests of the unfortunate children at heart is cordially invited.

    A meeting was held at the Vorwaerts Turnhalle (Turner Hall), yesterday afternoon, to devise ways and means to help the Rosehill orphanage, since the orphanage was destroyed by fire some ...

    German
    II D 4
  • Der Westen -- December 07, 1879
    The Orphanage in Rosehill

    The executive board of the Rosehill Orphanage cannot begin rebuilding at this time, because of inclement weather. It will be remembered that the Orphanage was destroyed by fire on October 26. However, as soon as conditions permit, building operations will be started, and, in the meantime, stone will be hauled.

    It is planned to erect a substantial, large building at an outlay of $20,000. This is a large sum, considering present funds. However, judging from the interest shown the institution in the past, and the hearty response of generous people who gave aid after the fire, the board hopes that sufficient money will be available eventually to provide a suitable building for the unfortunate children.

    The executive board takes this occasion to thank all who contributed so 2generously and promptly as soon as the tragedy became known. In connection therewith, we express our gratitude, first of all, to the inhabitants of Rosehill, whose ceaseless efforts during the fire prevented destruction of the two new adjacent buildings. There was a lack of fire equipment, and only the prompt action of the citizens prevented a more serious loss; in fact, nearly all of the furnishings of the destroyed building were removed and, most important of all, none of the children was injured. Shelter was provided elsewhere.

    The St. Michael's parish held a fair and gave us the receipts, amounting to $800, for which we give ardent thanks, and we also desire to express our gratitude for the activities of the residents of the West Side, who arranged a concert at the instigation of the Catholic Club and raised $1200; for the donation from the Luxemburger Aid Society, $50; for a $50 contribution from the Schwaben Verein (Swabian Club); and for $20 donated by the New Strassburg 3and Richton communities.

    While it is highly gratifying to observe the generally prevailing benevolent attitude, it is also equally deplorable to note the activities of scheming persons who use the fire and the plight of the orphans as a pretext for collecting money to enrich themselves. It has been reported that people are soliciting funds in the rural districts, as well as in the city, without being authorized to do so.

    We therefore advise the public that all persons presenting themselves as collectors should be regarded as swindlers unless they can identify themselves by presenting letters of introduction signed by Reverend De Dycker, president of the institution, or a local parish priest.

    The sisters of the Orphanage--and they are the only ones thus far authorized to solicit funds--will hold a house to house canvass in the near future, and we 4hope the people will rally to the support of the institution.

    In behalf of the executive board,

    L. Biehl,

    Secretary.

    The executive board of the Rosehill Orphanage cannot begin rebuilding at this time, because of inclement weather. It will be remembered that the Orphanage was destroyed by fire on October ...

    German
    II D 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- December 19, 1879
    Christmas Presents for German Orphans

    Christmas gifts will be distributed at Uhlich's Orphanage on Christmas Day. This simple statement may suffice to induce our good-natured Germans to act in behalf of the poor children who have no loving parents to arrange a pleasant festival.

    Uhlich's Orphanage takes care of sixty-four children at present--youngsters who have the same longings at Christmas time as the offsprings of a wealthier class, or the more fortunately situated children who bask in the love of their parents.

    We appeal to the hundreds of well-to-do German families in our city to think of these poor orphans. Give just a little, your own children will never miss it, and you will earn sincere gratitude. Give what you can spare, clothing, toys, cake, candy or food--everything is welcome.

    2

    Presents will be accepted at the following convenient locations:

    At the Orphanage, corner Burlington Street and Center Avenue; in the basement of St. Paul's Church, southwest corner of LaSalle and Ohio Streets; at Charles Emmerich and Company, 285-287 Madison Street, and at S. Bauer and Company, 191 Lake Street.

    Christmas gifts will be distributed at Uhlich's Orphanage on Christmas Day. This simple statement may suffice to induce our good-natured Germans to act in behalf of the poor children who ...

    German
    II D 10, III B 3 b, II D 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- December 27, 1879
    Christmas Presents at Uhlich's Orphanage

    Christmas presents were distributed yesterday afternoon at Uhlich's Orphanage, located at the corner of Burlington and Center Streets. Many members of Chicago's Lutheran parishes were present. In connection therewith let it be said, that the appeal of the asylum's executive board brought generous response from the Germans. Donors were very liberal, and so many presents were received that many were saved for another occasion.

    Members of the board, and several ladies, decorated the Christmas tree, which was mounted in the sewing room. The tree was provided by Miss Bauer, the Kindergarten teacher.

    The festivities started at 4 P. M. and several hundred people were present. The orphans, twenty-one girls and forty boys, marched from the schoolroom into the festival room, surrounded the tree and sang, "Vom Himmel Hoch Da Komm Ich Her". Pastor Hartmann preached an inspiring sermon and ended with a prayer.

    2

    Then the children sang "Ein Koenig Kommt Aus Zion," at the conclusion of which Reverend Gottlieb Blankenhahn, in charge of the Orphanage, had the children recite the prophesies of the Bible up to the time of Christ's birth.

    The tree was lit while the children sang "Welche Morgenroethe Wallet Himmelab," and, after a few more words were said about the age-old festival, the children formed into ranks again and marched and sang.

    Then the presents were distributed. At first a bag of candy and nuts, finally a toy commensurate with the child's age. The children played until 9 P. M. and then went to bed. We may well assume that all had pleasant dreams, as all departed in a very happy mood.

    Finally Reverend Mr. Hartmann addressed the visitors. The festival was undoubtedly one of the most outstanding affairs of its kind we have witnessed this year.

    Christmas presents were distributed yesterday afternoon at Uhlich's Orphanage, located at the corner of Burlington and Center Streets. Many members of Chicago's Lutheran parishes were present. In connection therewith let ...

    German
    III B 3 b, II D 4, III C, I B 4
  • Der Westen -- January 09, 1881
    An Orphan's Home

    To call a person charitable is a fine tribute paid to the one devoted to the alleviation of the suffering of humanity. But nothing can be nobler than to take the place of father of mother to the little orphans, and rear and rear and guide them all through childhood until they too are ready to take their places in the outside world. This is exactly the work the management of the German-Catholic orphanage in Rosehill has announced to do. Various German-Catholic communities throughout Chicago have adopted this humane system of caring for orphaned children ten years ago. Considering the comparatively short period since the original orphanage of Rosehill was built, and the fact that that structure was destroyed by fire, Oct. 26, 1879, it is highly commendable indeed, that they have not lost any time to erect a new orphan asylum, surpassing in excellence the building consumed by the flames.... Imposing ceremonies preceded the opening of the orphanage last Thursday.

    The home is built to accomodate 300 children. Among the fifty-six boys and 2forty girls in the home now, are also twenty foundlings. The management of the institution is entrusted to an Administrative Council, which is chosen by the seven Catholic communities, responsible for the erection and maintenance of this home. But the sisters, known as servants of Christ, are the direct managers of the home. The headquarters of their organization are in Gernbach, near Coblenz on the Rhine.

    Children placed in this German-Catholic institution remain there until after they have received first communion. Thereafter, they are placed in private homes, but remain under the guardianship of the Orphan's Home until they reach maturity.

    Inasmuch as the new building is very spacious, the sisters have taken upon themselves still greater responsibilities, namely, to take in, and care for, motherless infants, although the father may be living. Many a young widower, finding himself in just such a predicament, will hail this excellent opportunity offered to him by the sisters to give the child proper care and rearing.

    3

    After the simple but impressive dedication ceremonies were concluded, the installation of the newly elected officials took place. They are: Pater Essing, from the St. Michaels community, president; C. Wenn, pastor of St. Bonifacius Church is vice-president; Adam L. Amberg is treasurer; and Lorenz Biehl, secretary.

    The building is equipped with all the latest modern comforts....

    To call a person charitable is a fine tribute paid to the one devoted to the alleviation of the suffering of humanity. But nothing can be nobler than to take ...

    German
    II D 4, III C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 10, 1881
    Remember the Orphans Go to Ogden's Grove

    The yearly picnic for Uhlich's Orphanage will be given today at Ogden's Grove. The festival is different from former picnics of its kind because no appeal to a definite contingent in our community is made; instead of invoking the aid of this or that club, involving people from certain districts of Germany, such as Baveria, Nassau....etc., the festival committee now asks all our local Germans to participate. The annual picnic given by Uhlich's Orphanage long ago took on a much broader aspect; it became a German picnic, and all Germans went to the affair if it was possible. This is entirely due to the fact that the public in general has become fully aware of the institution's humanitarian efforts and knows that the children are well taken care of, that everything is done to provide an adequate substitute for the parental home, that the youngsters are not compelled to exist in dungeonlike surroundings but live and enjoy themselves like children not bereft of parents, that good schooling is provided, and that although their education is based on Christian principles, no bigotry 2is resorted to. Besides, the public knows that the administration is capable and economical in its management and is therefore able to care for a large number of children.

    This year the institution needs more money than formerly. With an increase in population there is also a correspondingly larger number of orphans. The place is beginning to be crowded, and an annex is urgently needed. For this reason the appeal has been general. Participation in the picnic helps to increase the funds of the institution. We feel that no one will ignore the appeal unless prevented by illness[from attending]. Ogden's Grove can be reached equally well by the Webster Avenue line or the Clybourn Avenue line.

    The yearly picnic for Uhlich's Orphanage will be given today at Ogden's Grove. The festival is different from former picnics of its kind because no appeal to a definite contingent ...

    German
    II D 4, V A 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 11, 1881
    The Orphanage Festival

    The orphanage festival given by the board of the institution at Ogden's Grove yesterday was a great success and exceeded even the expectations of the most optimistically inclined.

    The children to whom Uhlich's Orphanage means "home" rose at an early hour. They were eager to enjoy the day and could hardly restrain themselves. Finally, at nine o'clock, after being nicely dressed, combed, and fixed up, they set out led by Superintendent Blankenhahn and several other persons and proceeded to Center Street, where they boarded an open car which the North Side Street Car Company had provided gratuitously for the occasion. After arriving at the corner of Clark and Ohio Streets the children marched to St. Paul's Church and shortly afterwards formed in line again. Led by the Germania Band, they returned to Clark Street and proceeded to the car barns south of Division Street, where two Clybourn Avenue cars, reserved for them, brought the beaming children, the orphanage officials, and the brass band to the picnic grounds.

    2

    At Ogden's Grove the children amused themselves hugely, but the festival did not come into full swing until late in the afternoon. By three o'clock there were already several thousand people present, mostly women and children, and towards evening the place was densely crowded; it was a joy to behold what an interest our Germans showed in the orphans.

    A signal was given at three o'clock, whereupon the children came to the band stand and fell in line; led by Mr. Blankenhahn, they proceeded to the restaurant while the band played a lively march. Mrs. Lange, wife of the bakery owner, treated the happy throng to ice cream and cake.

    Other food was generously provided for the youngsters by the members of the Ladies' Club. Mrs. Brauckmann gave meat, Mrs. Niemeier, president of the club, potatoes, etc.; and others donated various items. In short, the little ones could eat to their hearts' content. Pastor Kling of Salem Church and Pastor Klein of Zion Church came at an early hour and met many of their church members. Pastor Hartmann of St. Paul's came towards evening and soon afterwards 3mounted the band stand and addressed the crowd in a short speech. He expressed his regrets that the Reverend Mr. Lambrecht because of overwork could not deliver the festival speech, and he then accorded a fitting tribute to President Garfield, confined to his bed, wounded by an assassin's bullet. Then the speaker expressed his appreciation of the beneficent work performed by the association which maintains the orphanage and gave thanks, in the name of the board, to all who had come to attend the festival as well as to the Germans in general for the liberal support given to the institution at all times and particularly when its finances were near the vanishing point. The speaker received loud applause.

    In the evening, after the day's work was done, men also came to the park in large numbers. Beautiful illumination increased the attractiveness of the festival, which was not marred by any untoward event; joviality prevailed until midnight.

    In this connection we must mention that Mr. Blankenhahn, whose work as 4superintendent has been greatly appreciated by all, tendered his resignation three months ago, and that it was reluctantly accepted. His successor, the Reverend Mr. Mauermann, former pastor of the Evangelical Lutheran congregation of Homewood, Illinois, will take charge on the first of September. He is regarded as a very capable pedagogue.

    The orphanage festival given by the board of the institution at Ogden's Grove yesterday was a great success and exceeded even the expectations of the most optimistically inclined. The children ...

    German
    II D 4, III C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 10, 1886
    Der Westen Sunday Edition The Administration of the St. Sonifacius Cemetey and of the Orphan Home in Pose Hill. Anaual Meeting of the Boare of Directors.

    At the refectory of the Franciscan Convent, the yearly meeting of the Directors of the Catholic Orphanage and the Catholic St. Bonifagius Cemetery was held under the chairmanship of the Rev. Father Fischer. The priest of every German Catholic parsonage and two members of each parish participated as representatives. Rev. Father Fischer made a speech in which he related that at the time of the foundation of the cemetery only four German parishes existed in this city and that it was a hard struggle before the Catholics, who were then hated received a permit to found their own cemetery. This was in 1863. Today the parishes share the cemetery. Four small parishes founded the cemetery in the belief that it would provide resting places for the dead for an endless number of years. Today, with more than 80,000 German Catholics in Chicago, new cemeteries soon will have to be established. The same is true of the Orphan home, but in an even more pressing way, 183 children have found a good home there, thanks to the unselfish service of twelve servants of Christ. During the last year, 1,132 Catholics found their last resting place at the St. Bonifacius Cemetery.

    A sum of $1,000 was received by the Orphan Home from the Katholischer Jugend 2Freund which represents the net profit of this publication edited by the Rev. Aloys Thiele at 1 North Clark St.

    At the refectory of the Franciscan Convent, the yearly meeting of the Directors of the Catholic Orphanage and the Catholic St. Bonifagius Cemetery was held under the chairmanship of the ...

    German
    III C, II D 4