The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- December 24, 1900
    Josef H. Ernst

    Through the death of Josef H. Ernst, the Germans of Chicago have lost one of their most capable representatives.

    He was born on February 25, 1838, in Bingen on the Rhine. He emigrated to this country when he was 16 years old. He crossed the Atlantic ocean on the French ship "St. Nicholes." The trip lasted forty-eight days. After coming to Chicago he enrolled as a student in the old Franklin school..... As assistant to his uncle, then superintendent of the Chicago City Cemetery, he had ample time to attend Sloan's Commercial and Law College, completing his studies in 1858. Then followed his appointment in 1864, by the Mayor of Chicago, as superintendent of the City Cemetery, and two 2years later he was elected Clerk of the Comptroller's office. He occupied this position for fifteen years. Mr. Ernst was elected secretary of the Mutual German Fire Insurance Company of North Chicago in 1874.

    His election in 1886 as Alderman (Democratic) of the fifteenth ward shows the high esteem in which he was held by his fellow citizens. He was re-elected in 1888, but according to the new district division he represented what is now the twenty-first ward. Ernst emphatically declined his re-election in 1890, but in 1892 he could not resist the urgent plea of his friends any longer and, therefore, announced his candidacy for alderman on the Independent ticket. He received almost as many votes in this 3election as were cast for both of his opponents combined. He always justified the confidence placed in him by the public. Mr. Ernst, was a member of various German benevolent societies to which he donated much of his time and efforts.....

    Through the death of Josef H. Ernst, the Germans of Chicago have lost one of their most capable representatives. He was born on February 25, 1838, in Bingen on the ...

    German
    IV, II D 1, II D 2, I F 5
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 07, 1901
    Complacent Warriors Installation of Officers at the Veterans Club of Chicago

    The officers of the German Veterans Club of Chicago were inducted into office yesterday at the first meeting of the New Year, held at the North Side Turner Hall during the afternoon. Two former presidents, Joseph Forcher, and Joseph Schlenker, inducted the new leaders. During the course of the proceedings, Martin Gass, treasurer of the German Veterans Alliance of North America, made the encouraging announcement that the treasury of the Alliance has $16,000 available for death benefits. The relatives of deceased members receive $300. The per capita rate is $6 per year. He added that three German Veterans associations have been affiliated with the Alliance since the last general session, and that a substantial increase may be expected in the near future.

    After the business session, the meeting turned into a social affair 2under the guidance of Mr. Tanzer, the new president. He suggested that a special chairman be elected for the occasion, and the well-known "Barbarossa," Fritz Lindemann, was selected on the strength of his often-proven capacity. Then followed dancing, lively and jovial, to say nothing of the homage paid to barley brew. There was no lack of humorous recitations; such exponents in the art as Albert Luettke, Franz Damske, Stein, and many more, took good care of that.

    Other clubs sent delegates, among them police officer Max Heidelmeier, a former German cavalry captain.

    The officers of the German Veterans Club of Chicago were inducted into office yesterday at the first meeting of the New Year, held at the North Side Turner Hall during ...

    German
    III B 2, II D 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 09, 1901
    Elections of Officers

    The Sickness Benefit League for German Musicians held its general meeting and election yesterday at W. H. Jung's Hall, 106 Randolph Street. The club has about 200 members and cash reserves of $2,700.

    The German Waiters Club of Chicago, to which many of our oldest and best known tavern-keepers belong, held its annual meeting and election at its headquarters, 164 Michigan Avenue. The Club was founded twenty-three years ago and is in a thriving condition according to its treasurer, W. H. Yung, who was re-elected for the 20th time yesterday. The cash reserves are $1,850 and last year $480 were paid in death premiums and sick benefits. All former officials were re-elected by acclamation.

    The Sickness Benefit League for German Musicians held its general meeting and election yesterday at W. H. Jung's Hall, 106 Randolph Street. The club has about 200 members and cash ...

    German
    II D 1, II D 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 21, 1901
    The Hermann Sisters Benefit Society Installation of Officers at Apollo Hall

    The installation ceremony of the newly elected officials of the Hermann Sisters Benefit society was held at a public meeting yesterday afternoon at Apollo Hall, Blue Island Avenue, near Twelfth Street. The following lodges of the order were involved: Thusnelda No. 1, Harmony No. 3, Hermann No. 4, Concordia o. 5, Faithful Sisters No. 6, Victoria No. 7, Friendship No. 8, Gross Park No. 9, Germania No. 10, Bavaria No. 11, Hope No. 12, and Liberty lodge No. 13.

    The Grand president, Mrs. Marie Kamel, gave the festive speech, which was given deserved acclaim.

    The order was founded in 1896, and now has nearly 2,000 members. The cash reserve of the order and its separate lodges are very gratifying, 2although they originated rather recently. During periods of illness, the members receive from $4 to $5 per week, and all possible assistance in case of accident; death benefits are $200. Initiation and dues are very low. The lodges are particularly interested in the German language and German customs.

    The installation ceremony of the newly elected officials of the Hermann Sisters Benefit society was held at a public meeting yesterday afternoon at Apollo Hall, Blue Island Avenue, near Twelfth ...

    German
    II D 1, II D 2, I K
  • Abendpost -- March 21, 1904
    Vox Poluli

    To the Editor of the "Abendpost".

    In yesterday's Sonntagspost appeared a report about the Order of the "Ritter and Damen von America" (Knights and Ladies of America) according to which the State Insurance Department has taken steps to prevent the continuation of the Order's business in this State. As by this article the named society, which consists mainly of Germans, has been placed in a critical situation, I wish herewith to clear up the entire affair.

    As is well-known the State demands, according to the new Insurance Laws, that every Grand-Lodge that falls under the category of "Fraternal Beneficiary Societies" must send in certain reports to Springfield every year. But the former States-Attorney, General Maloney, had made the decision, that the Order of the "Knights and Ladies of America" was not directly subjected to this State control, because it is, so to speak, only a Welfare Society.

    The Order of the "Knights and Ladies of America" has today not a single penny 2of debts and is financially one of the best situated in Illinois. If I am not mistaken, there are pending similar lawsuits in the Chicago Courts against well-known Chicago German Societies. Those Societies tried to create a so-called "test" case, whether the State is really within its right to force the Clubs to submit a report every year to Springfield. The fact alone, that a Society does not send its annual report to Springfield is no proof that the Order is in a doubtful condition. The Grand Lodge of the "Knights and Ladies of America" has now resolved,in order to prevent any misunderstanding, - to send these annual reports to Springfield.

    Yours truly,

    Max Rohden, Grand President.

    Remark of the Editor.

    Resting upon an error of the Court Reporter in question, the news found its way into the Press that Judge Dunne issued last Saturday such an injunction 3against the above said Order, while in fact he declined the immediate issue of a temporary injunction with the argument, that in consideration of the aims of the Order and the interests of its members he does not find it proper to comply with the motion made by the State Insurance Superintendent Vredenburg. Judge Dunne requested of the Grand Officials of the Order that they deposit their Lodge monies at the same bank as before and this promise was given. The Grand Lodge of the Order has now twenty days time in which to answer to the motion of the Insurance Superintendent, and before the case is decided, two months may elapse. At present the Grand Lodge and the subordinated Lodges can manage their business in the customary way.

    To the Editor of the "Abendpost". In yesterday's Sonntagspost appeared a report about the Order of the "Ritter and Damen von America" (Knights and Ladies of America) according to which ...

    German
    II D 2, II D 1
  • Abendpost -- April 20, 1911
    The Schwaben Society

    The annual meeting of the Schwaben Society of Chicago, conducted by its president, Mr. Eugen Niederegger, was held at the North Side Turner Hall yesterday. The splendid work of the society during the last year was revealed by Mr. Julius Schmidt, secretary of the Association, when he read the report stating that the Association donated $8,555 for charitable and other worthy causes. The sum of $3,230 was granted by the General Assembly, October last, supplemented by later grants as follows: the sum of $100 toward the erection of a monument, in memory of the fallen warriors at Champigny, near Paris; $100 toward the funds for needy veterans of German wars, now residing in Chicago; $250 toward the celebration of the silver wedding anniversary of the King of Wuerttemberg; the German-American Teacher's Seminary in Milwaukee, received the sum of $115; and the Goethe Monument 2fund of Chicago $5,000. In addition, smaller sums were also granted for the benefit of the sick, the unemployed, and various other humanitarian causes.

    The election of a new president will take place at the North Side Turner Hall Wednesday next.

    The annual meeting of the Schwaben Society of Chicago, conducted by its president, Mr. Eugen Niederegger, was held at the North Side Turner Hall yesterday. The splendid work of the ...

    German
    II D 1, II D 8, II D 2, II C
  • Abendpost -- August 10, 1911
    The German-Hungarians Alliance

    The Hungarian National Sick Benefit Association, 1502 Sedgwick Street, Chicago, in conjunction with the German-Hungarian Worker's Alliance of Cincinnati, requests all German-Hungarian Societies, regardless of their individual plans or pursuance, to recommend the founding of a German-Hungarian Alliance. The advocates of that plan point out the deplorable economic and political conditions in Hungary, which are directly responsible for the ever increasing emigration of that country. In order to prevent a repetition of such conditions for the immigrants in this country, namely; to enjoy neither right nor protection,as is the case in their native land, it is superlative that the proposed organization should receive the necessary support.

    The creation of the Alliance in question is undeminably important, and the fact alone that a great many societies with chiefly humanitarian interests 2have been already founded leads to the strengthening of the plan. The following points are considered essential in the activity of that organization: The first concern of the Alliance must be the protection of all German-Hungarians living in the United States, assisting them in obtaining personal rights and respect, which is its close ally. The protection of the citizen's rights for any member of any society, united with the German-Hungarian Alliance. A representative of that organization shall be stationed at Ellis Island to assist their countrymen in eventual difficulties, and whose plight could possibly culminate in deportation to their respective homelands. The organization shall refrain from political activities, except when the German-Hungarians are involved. And, of course, it would be within the rights of the Alliance to protect the interest of labor, if such should be jeopardized. Death benefits are also proposed for the members of the association, details of which have yet to be announded. However, the contributions will be determined according to the number of members. The German-Hungarian societies are thus requested to give earnest consideration to this issue, and be represented at the next meeting of delegates.

    The Hungarian National Sick Benefit Association, 1502 Sedgwick Street, Chicago, in conjunction with the German-Hungarian Worker's Alliance of Cincinnati, requests all German-Hungarian Societies, regardless of their individual plans or pursuance, ...

    German
    II D 1, II D 2, II D 7, I F 1
  • Abendpost -- September 11, 1911
    The Zealous Activity

    Four hundred delegates, representatives of various branches of the German Roman-Catholic Association, were in full activity at the morning session....Mr. J. B Oelkers, of Newark, N. J., the president of the organization, welcomed the members to the convention. Reverend Max Wurst, of Wabasha, Minn., delivered the prayer. Then followed the presentation of Archbishop Quigley and the papal nuncio Msgr. Falconio, of Washington, both of whom welcomed the representatives to the convention, expressing their hopes for a successful outcome....

    Reverend E. J. Vattman, of Winnetka, secretary of the Catholic Colonization Organization, who served for years as an army chaplain of the Federal Government,--now pensioned--reported on the desirability of the existence and work of this association. A letter was then read, the author of which was a highly respected member of the Catholic Church in Texas, which stressed specifically the fact that the Church was an ideal organization for the founding of colonies 2for their co-religionists. Four dignitaries and spiritual leaders of the Catholic Church are at the head of this association, which is incorporated under the laws of Illinois.

    Reverend Ledvina, vice-president and secretary of the society for the dissemination of the Catholic faith, then reported on the activities of his organization. He thus informed the convention that 600 Catholic Missions had been transformed into communities; moreover, a church was erected in each of these communities. Great financial aid towards the furtherance of this work came from a German Catholic, but names of those who had contributed were not disclosed.

    One of the delegates to the convention expressed his consternation as to the manner exhibited by the English press of Chicago, toward the Central Association. Considerable space would have been given by these newspapers to a meeting of nine Socialists of Milwaukee, for instance, but no mention was made of this 3great German organization. The delegates decided to take action against this treatment by the English press, and therefore, suggested that a special committee take up this matter.

    The afternoon program consisted of reports submitted by the officials of the Association, according to which, 110,460 members are included in the organization. This announcement was made by Mr. John R. Juenemann, of St. Paul, Minn., who functions in the dual role, that of financial secretary and corresponding secretary. He also made it known that $60,481.01, was paid for sick benefits, while $164,942.79, was paid for death benefits.....(A long list of names of various state organizations followed).......

    Four hundred delegates, representatives of various branches of the German Roman-Catholic Association, were in full activity at the morning session....Mr. J. B Oelkers, of Newark, N. J., the president of ...

    German
    III C, III B 2, II D 2, II D 1, II D 3, I C
  • Abendpost -- April 09, 1926
    Low-German Guilds

    Among the many mutual aid societies, the low-German guilds take an outstanding place. They not only give a life insurance for $500, but also sick aid of $8 per week up to $1432. It is as far-reaching and liberal as any thrifty and economic administration can be.

    The low-German guilds selected the oak as their symbol and, like it, they defy every storm and every danger. Also who is less able can join the guilds because of its low costs and every decent and healthy person, man or woman alike, between eighteen and forty-five years of age and who understands the German language, may become a member of the guilds. The low-German guilds have grown into one of the largest, most popular, and surest types of German aid societies. Its favorable conditions, liberal aid, thrifty administration, and security of existence, make them a very blessed aid and insurance group of our times.

    2

    For more detailed information one may apply to the Grotgilde office, 2046 West North Avenue (Wicker Park Hall).

    Among the many mutual aid societies, the low-German guilds take an outstanding place. They not only give a life insurance for $500, but also sick aid of $8 per week ...

    German
    II D 2, II D 1
  • Abendpost -- April 06, 1929
    The Plattdeutsche Gilden

    This outstanding mutual aid association has operated on this continent for more than forty years. The organization has at its disposal a capital exceeding $400,000, paying, in case of death, five hundred dollars to the family of the deceased member. It also pays sick benefits, the maximum sum of cash assistance being fixed at $1,432.

    Furthermore, whenever the Plattdeutsche Gilden arranges an entertainment, the program invariably provides a variety of amusements, rich in humor. Of course, the inevitable German Gemuetlichkeit figures ever so prominently in these occasions.

    According to the laws of this organization, any person familiar with the German language may become a member of this organization, provided, however, 2that the applicant has reached the age of maturity, namely eighteen years, and has not passed the age limit of forty five years. Nominal contributions enable even those with a moderate income to join this organization.

    This outstanding mutual aid association has operated on this continent for more than forty years. The organization has at its disposal a capital exceeding $400,000, paying, in case of death, ...

    German
    II D 1, II D 2