The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 26, 1862
    Quarterly Report of the President of the Chicago Arbeiter-Verein (Published at the request of the Verein)

    Despite the fact that the entrance fee was raised last winter, the membership of the Chicago Arbeiter-Verein has steadily increased. The new constitution has been printed and every member has received a copy. As far as we can judge at this time, the Verein will do well under it. The finances of the Verein are in good condition. The library of the Verein has been enlarged considerably, and the members have contributed their share to charity. It is hardly necessary to remind the members that the Verein is obligated to participate in every good work. Thus far, the organization has a good record in this respect.

    The following contributions were made for benevolent purposes during the past six months:

    2

    For Hecker's Regiment.....................$ 50.00

    For the wives of Union soldiers.......... 205.00

    For sick and wounded soldiers............ 50.00

    Total.........................................$305.00

    I thank the members and friends of the Verein who have assisted in obtaining these contributions.

    Disbursements for Library

    For periodicals:

    From November, 1861 to February, 1862...........$ 35.00

    From February, 1862 to May, 1862................... 37.00

    Total.....................................................$ 72.00

    3

    For books and binding:

    From November, 1861 to February, 1862...$135.00

    From February, 1862 to May, 1862............. 88.00

    Total.............................................$223.00

    If the library of a society may be considered a barometer of the educational standing of the members, we can view our shelves and cases with great satisfaction, since we have purchased the works of Dickens, Sir Walter Scott, Feuerbach, Hacklaender, Freiligrath, Cooper, Auerbach, Spindler, etc. The report of the librarian shows that our members are making good use of this source of education.

    The English night school which our Verein maintains for the benefit of the members has been in session regularly throughout the winter, which shows that our members also appreciate this opportunity to acquire knowledge. And the attendance would certainly have been much larger if the school were more 4centrally located, and if many had not been prevented by business, work, etc. from attending the school.

    The Verein also provided for the choral section. The entertainment given for the benefit of our singers netted $47.72, and this sum was turned over to the treasurer with the express understanding that he use the money to purchase music, etc.

    Fortunately, there were not many cases of sickness among the members; we seldom had more than three cases at a time, and there were no deaths.

    Our affiliation with the Peoria Arbeiter-Verein, should it materialize, will be the first step in our endeavor to spread the principles laid down in our constitution. It is desirable that our members who make their homes in other cities try to organize an Arbeiterverein there, using our constitution as a model, so that eventually anyone who leaves Chicago and settles in some other city will find an affiliated society in which he may become a member, and thus continue to 5receive the benefits which he now enjoys as a member of the Chicago Arbeiter-Verein.

    Our Sunday evening entertainments have always been very well attended. It would be a great advantage to the members if the committee on lectures could provide for a lecture every two weeks. Besides stimulating the mind and increasing the knowledge of ambitious members and their friends, such lectures would, in my opinion, be the best means of getting rid of the class of people that thinks only of itself and its amusement and gives no thought to the responsibility which the Verein assumes when it arranges for this kind of entertainment. Let no one say that these people are afflicted with boredom only at certain lectures. The fact is that they are bored at every serious lecture. That was proved at the lecture on the death of Lovejoy, a martyr to the cause of liberty. Fortunately, there are only a few who place little value on education, and the sooner these people cease coming to our hall when serious topics are discussed, the better it will be for all concerned. And even if the subject matter is above the mental capacity of some of those who come to the meeting place of the Verein, they ought 6to have manners enough not to disturb those who want to listen, and should show enough respect for the lecturer to be quiet at least while he is speaking.....

    At the last meeting, the members elected a committee which has the duty of obtaining fuel at less than retail cost. I have a recommendation to make in regard to this matter. The Verein has some money in a bank. How about using it to buy fuel at wholesale for the benefit of members, and the treasury of the Verein? If each member should save only fifty cents by buying a ton of coal from the Verein, and the Verein should realize seventy-five cents on the transaction, the member would have a substantial saving, and, with coal at four dollars per ton, the Verein's money would have an earning capacity as follows:

    Net profit on investment $100 $18.75
    " " " " 400 75.00
    " " " " 533 100.00
    7

    That certainly is more than a bank pays, or can pay. And that is but three fifths of the entire profit, since the fifty cents saved by the purchaser must be considered also. Thus, if we would invest the whole of our bank balance ($533), the entire profit would be $100 for the Verein and $66.66 for the members. That would be a gain of 311/4 per cent, and the danger of loss would be eliminated because all transactions would be for cash only. I recommend that the Verein give this matter serious consideration.

    At the end of the last quarter the membership of the Verein was 389, a gain of 49.

    I have the great pleasure of informing you that a much friendlier spirit now prevails in our business meetings. When there is debating, it is done with less bitterness, and without sarcastic references to individuals. Thus the spirit of brotherhood is growing stronger, and as long as it asserts its power, the Verein will flourish.

    Theodor Hielscher,

    President of Chicago Arbeiter-Verein

    Despite the fact that the entrance fee was raised last winter, the membership of the Chicago Arbeiter-Verein has steadily increased. The new constitution has been printed and every member has ...

    German
    II D 1, II B 2 a, II B 2 f, II B 2 g, II B 1 a, II D 10, I A 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 16, 1871
    [Dr. Von Holst to Lecture]

    Announcement of forthcoming lectures by Dr. Von Holst. Year before he spoke about American History and found enthusiastic applause.

    After six lectures on "Pictures out of the History of French Depotism," he will go on to Milwaukee where he is to lecture three times.

    Announcement of forthcoming lectures by Dr. Von Holst. Year before he spoke about American History and found enthusiastic applause. After six lectures on "Pictures out of the History of French ...

    German
    IV, II B 2 g, I E
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 21, 1871
    Unusual Long Report about German Mass Meeting against the "Dirty Arms Trade" (Waffenschacher) Speech by Casper Butz:

    "When the war broke out, we hoped that the people who are blessed with democratic Governments would sympathize with Germany. We have deceived ourselves and have learned that this Republic in its relation to foreign nations is nothing but a business firm. Five months ago Wilhelm Rapp went for the first time to Washington to protest against arms being sent to France. Since then arms for $12,000,000 have gone out. Where would France have been after Sedan without these arms? Who has given those deluded Brenchmen the means to continue the war? Not England, but the U. S. Even the arsenal of St. Louis has been emptied. This is a shame. All of the Germans here should have arisen before to put an end to this damnable dealing in blood."

    Next speaker, George Schneider, lauds sending of grain to France("with grain one makes people happy, one does not kill"). but bitterly attacks Carl Schurz(without naming him). "The Germans demand in serious times, serious men. No church steeple policy, no policies of empty phrases. He does not represent Missouri alone. And if this man, however high he stands, forgets his mother and forgets the Germans, he must be criticized mercilessly.

    "When the war broke out, we hoped that the people who are blessed with democratic Governments would sympathize with Germany. We have deceived ourselves and have learned that this Republic ...

    German
    III B 1, II B 2 g, III A, III H, I C, I G, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 18, 1872
    Anniversary of the Paris Commune

    The members of the "International Society," celebrated, yesterday afternoon, in the Globe Theatre, the anniversay of the proclamation of the Paris Commune. Attendance was pretty large; there were even a few ladies present.

    Mr. Zimpel opened the meeting (apparently in German), Mr. Traner in Swedish.

    Mr. Karl Klings made a long address: " A year ago," he said, "the greatest epoch of the history of the world opened; for the night of March 17th to March 18th, the first open fight between 'bourgeois' and worker broke out. So many lies have been spread about the Paris Commune, it is time to tell the truth." The next speaker was a Mr. Eger, who spoke in Swedish and whose elegant appearance did not seem to prove that a just share of fruits of his labor had been withheld from him. He gave a fiery address and was frequently interrupted by applause.....

    Mr. Traner Jr., spoke in English, admonishing every worker to educate himself for the struggle. "Even if we should not see the end, perhaps we shall 2succeed in gaining for our children a better future," he said. Finally, Mr. Krause, spoke in German, and Mr. Charles Dilke, in English.

    The members of the "International Society," celebrated, yesterday afternoon, in the Globe Theatre, the anniversay of the proclamation of the Paris Commune. Attendance was pretty large; there were even a ...

    German
    I E, II B 1 c 3, II B 2 g, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 27, 1874
    The Opposition in the 17th Ward.

    A great meeting of the opposition party took place yesterday in Thielemann's National Theater.

    A. C. Hesing was the main speaker. He said: "Some time ago I was told, that I would not dare to enter the old settlement of the Germans on the Northside to make a speech, because all my fellow countrymen had once more become Republicans. Today's meeting is the best proof, that the movement started 18 months ago, is still alive. It is said that Hesing has left the Republican party: I maintain that neither I nor you have left the Republican party, but that the Republican party has left us. Then I had the pleasure in May, 1854 to speak at the same meeting with Mr. Hassaurek in Cincinnati, it was in order to found a new party in opposition to the Whig and Democratic party. Soon afterwards I moved to Chicago and in June of the following year the first Republican meeting took place and there I helped to found the Republican party. From this time until the revolt of the temperance fanatics I have adhered to the Republican party. But in the year 1871 the Republicans started to introduce their temperance laws in the legislatures.

    2

    But it is not now only a question of temperance laws but also of corruption. When a man who a few years ago came to Washington as a poor soldier has now from 5 to 6 million dollars and occupies the chair of Washington and Lincoln, is it to be wondered at if corruption is widesprand in the Republican party.

    Robert Thiem the next speaker, said: "When one year ago I started to fight for our sacred rights, together with A. C. Hesing, Hermann Lieb, Carl Knobelsdorf, Adolf Schoninger and other German leaders, I never believed that I would stand here today, to fight once more the same enemy. In several states the Republican party has even pressed into its ranks the feminine sex, I mean the prayer sisters, those saloon hyenas, of which Chicago was free, due to our victory, on November 4th. The main thing is that politics must once more become honest. This can be obtained only if each of you takes an interest in politics."

    A great meeting of the opposition party took place yesterday in Thielemann's National Theater. A. C. Hesing was the main speaker. He said: "Some time ago I was told, that ...

    German
    II B 2 g, I F 6, I B 2, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 01, 1875
    Hans Balatka on Music Lecture at the Atheneum

    Hans Balatka gave a lecture yesterday....at the Chicago Atheneum before a large, refined audience. His subject was music....its history and development. He spoke in English. [Translator's note: As he did not speak in German and as English newspapers may have given an account of it, the translation is only fragmentary.]....We must admit that Mr. Balatka dealt very successfully with this tremendous theme, which involves consideration of the entire civilized world, and of a period of nearly three thousand years. It is a great accomplishment to speak and write so briefly on this subject and yet give a clear picture of the whole.

    Mr. Balatka briefly indicated what is known of the music of the ancient races, and then turned to a consideration of more recent periods. He described church music in its early form, how the material became more involved when the purely melodic form was augmented by harmony. Then he gave a short account of the development of counterpoint, the thriving era of Catholic ecclesiastical music up to Palestrina, and its gradual decadence up to the present; the origin 2of the oratorio in 1600 A.D., and the evolution of opera from the old church plays....the blossoming of Protestant church music and the oratorio under Mach, and Handel, up to Liszt's "Saint Elizabeth" of our day.....He told of the origin of opera in Florence, Italy, and its triumphant progress through-out the world....

    He extolled Wagner....as author and composer....Mr. Balatka speaks English well, at times with dexterity and effect, and with scarcely a trace of accent ....At the conclusion of his lecture he was given enthusiastic applause. The lecture was highly successful, and we congratulate Mr. Balatka.

    Hans Balatka gave a lecture yesterday....at the Chicago Atheneum before a large, refined audience. His subject was music....its history and development. He spoke in English. [Translator's note: As he did ...

    German
    II B 2 g, II B 1 a, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 01, 1877
    Socialism and Communism

    Upon the invitation of the Turn Community of Chicago, Mr. Heinrich Ende of Milwaukee gave last night a lecture on "Socialism and Communism". The small audience which gathered there was proof enough that the Germans are not interested in Socialism. Attorney Philipp Stein introduced the speaker. Due to his extraordinary education the audience followed his speech with great interest.

    Whoever expected the speaker to demonstrate that Socialism and Communism are vastly different, was greatly disappointed. On the contrary, Mr. Ende did not deny that both sprang from the same root and therfore belong to the same class. "Communism is man's expression of the dark feeling, especially of the laborer, that a betterment of his lot has to come, whereas Socialism is a scientifically founded doctrine." Communism and Socialism differ without clashing....

    Upon the invitation of the Turn Community of Chicago, Mr. Heinrich Ende of Milwaukee gave last night a lecture on "Socialism and Communism". The small audience which gathered there was ...

    German
    I E, II B 2 g
  • Der Westen -- March 18, 1877
    [Herman Linde to Give Shakespeare Recitations Here]

    Mr. Hermann Linde, the famous Shakespeare reciter, will give here next month a number of recitations. Mr. Linde does not read the dramas but recites them from memory in such a manner that the audience always listens with the deepest interest. The most eminent critics of Germany have praised his performances. A picture of Mr. Linde has been displayed at the Enderis book store, corner of Clark and Lake streets.

    Mr. Hermann Linde, the famous Shakespeare reciter, will give here next month a number of recitations. Mr. Linde does not read the dramas but recites them from memory in such ...

    German
    II B 2 g, III H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 28, 1878
    The Labor Party (Arbeiter Partei) of the United States

    For a long time there have been signs of a split in the Labor Party pertaining to its socialistic, communistic and more conservative elements. The Ultra-Socialists of the Party, mostly Germans, want the name of the Labor Party changed to Socialist Labor Party. The less radical elements of the Party do not agree with this and called a meeting yesterday at the City Hall after the session of the city council. This meeting was presided over by Mr. A. W. Herr, who introduced Mr. W. V. Barr as speaker of the day.

    Mr. Barr gave a short history of the Labor Party and explained why all achievements of the Labor Party should be accomplished with the exclusion of radical elements.

    Thereupon the meeting voted by a large majority to keep the old name "Labor Party" and set up the following aims as a new program:

    2

    1.The acceptation of an eight hour work day for any kind of work, except farm work.

    2.The elimination of convict work in any trade, and the use of convicts in public maintenance work only.

    3.The abolition of the conspiracy laws, which mark the worker a criminal, because he is trying to protect his only property, the job - while the capitalists are at liberty to raise the prices of food etc and to cut down the wages of labor.

    4.The recall of vagrancy laws, which make poverty a crime.

    5.The sanction of all laws by the nation's referendum before their ratification.

    6.The abolition of child labor under the age of fourteen in any industry or factory.

    3

    7. The elimination of private street car companies and confiscation of their lines, as soon as they violate the concession rules, and the introduction of a three cent street car fare under city management.

    8. The purchase of all gas plants on a reasonably low estimation, or the construction of new city owned gas plants. The maximum of $1.50 per 1,000 feet for the consumers.

    9. The abolition of the contract system for all public work, direct payment and supervision of all pertaining labor through city employees and a time schedule of eight hours per day.

    10. The abrogation of all national banks and their replacement by Federal Banks, the notes of which always could be exchanged for currency in gold or silver.

    The program, as outlined above, was adopted through acclamation by the meeting, which then adjourned in an orderly fashion.

    For a long time there have been signs of a split in the Labor Party pertaining to its socialistic, communistic and more conservative elements. The Ultra-Socialists of the Party, mostly ...

    German
    I E, II B 2 g, I F 3, I H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 05, 1878
    Lecture of Paul Grottkau

    Introduced by Mr. G. Bartels, the editor of the Berlin newspaper, Freie Presse, Mr. Paul Grottkau gave a lecture yesterday afternoon at the Vorwaerts Turner Hall on 12th Street. The subject of his lecture was, "The present situation in Germany and other civilized countries" from the socialistic standpoint.

    Introduced by Mr. G. Bartels, the editor of the Berlin newspaper, Freie Presse, Mr. Paul Grottkau gave a lecture yesterday afternoon at the Vorwaerts Turner Hall on 12th Street. The ...

    German
    I E, III H, II B 2 g, IV