The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Abendpost -- November 23, 1914
    Objectionable Movie Barred

    A film entitled "The Ordeal," which has been showing at the Bijou Dream Theatre on State Street, will be barred from further display. The movie has met with strong opposition from German groups. As a result of the opinion of Assistant Corporation Counsel George Reker, Second Assistant Chief of Police, Major Funkhouser, head of the vice squad, will prohibit the display of the film. In an interview which he granted to an Abendpost reporter, he said that according to the opinion of the Corporation Counsel a city ordinance prohibiting the display of pictures inciting race riots will furnish the legal power to ban the movie. The film shows war pictures which are downright insulting to any German. The showing was also prohibited in New York by court order.

    A film entitled "The Ordeal," which has been showing at the Bijou Dream Theatre on State Street, will be barred from further display. The movie has met with strong opposition ...

    German
    II B 2 e, I G
  • Abendpost -- November 25, 1925
    Germany of Today.

    Long before 7 o'clock, the church of Pastor Menzel began to fill up with visitors last Sunday evening. The last showing of the film, "Germany of today", brought the south side of Chicago to its feet, and the German element proved once more that it does not fail where the question of help for their afflicted fellow countrymen is concerned.

    When, about 8 o'clock, Mrs. Helen Lorriman opened the program with a beautiful organ solo, there was not a single seat to be had in the church. Pastor Menzel greeted the assembled audience with a few hearty words, and expressed his satisfaction that in spite of the short notice the attendance was so excellent. After a few remarks by Dr. Robert Trent, about the purpose of the evening, the film program began.

    On the occasion of former film evenings, everything has been told about the film itself. On the south side, too, it won the hearts of the audience. Mrs. Lorriman rendered the musical accompaniment on the organ. Between the acts of the film, Professor Broeniman offered violin solos and the "Arion of the South Side" sang beautiful German songs.

    2

    Dr. Trent was fully justified in saying that the "Society for the Germans in Foreign Lands", in its American branch, is trying to offer only the very best through its film and lecture evenings to assist the German children in the stolen provinces. The speaker sketched a living picture of the lives and sufferings of the millions of Germans who have been bartered through the peace treaties in foreign countries. The contents of his speech were afterwards fully confirmed through the pictures of 30,000 Germsns, evicted by Poland. Afterwards a collection was taken up by Pastor Meuzel, which netted $128.

    Long before 7 o'clock, the church of Pastor Menzel began to fill up with visitors last Sunday evening. The last showing of the film, "Germany of today", brought the south ...

    German
    III H, II D 10, II B 1 a, II B 2 e, I G
  • Abendpost -- April 12, 1926
    Fredericus Rex Film in Chicago

    Of all the great German moving pictures of the last few years, "Fredericus Rex" (Frederic the Great, popularily nicknamed "the old Fritz"), may claim to be the greatest box-office success in Germany. Admission tickets were sold weeks in advance, the film then ran for months and months with all seats sold.

    This German talking film, which has only recently been released in America, is now coming to Chicago to be shown in Orchestra Hall, 220 South Michigan Avenue, at a gala performance on April 26. In dazzlingly beautiful pictures and mass scenes, in which more than 3,000 actors participated, the struggle between father and son, King Frederic William I, hard as iron, and his genial successor, Frederic the Great is shown, a struggle which finally wound up with the reconciliation of father with son.

    Frederick the Great, the Old Fritz, is one of the greatest historical personages of the German people; he is the darling of them all, regardless of party 2creed. To see him in the movies is the yearning of all Germans all over the world; it signifies love for the old homeland.

    Therefore, the urgent appeal gees out to all Germans of Chicago to show, by their appearance on Monday, April 26, at Orchestra Hall, a united German front; it is for the honor of the great German national hero, for the Old Fritz!

    Anticipating a large crowd, it is advisable to secure seats in advance. Admission tickets: 50c, 75c and $1 on the balcony, $1 and $1.50 in the orchestra. Tickets are available at Koelling's Bookstere, 206 West Randolph Street, at Schlesinger's Music Store, 535 West North Avenue, Anhalt's Bookstore, 1710 Belmont Avenue and, after April 15 at Orchestra Hall.

    Of all the great German moving pictures of the last few years, "Fredericus Rex" (Frederic the Great, popularily nicknamed "the old Fritz"), may claim to be the greatest box-office success ...

    German
    II B 2 e, III H
  • Abendpost -- September 11, 1927
    Berlin Sends Delegates and Materials to Exhibition.

    Highly interesting materials were sent from Berlin to the Travel Exhibition, which will be held at the Stevens Hotel.

    Since over 350,000 Americans traveled abroad last year to study in foreign countries,we should expect that this exhibition will be a splendid success.

    In the first place, the exhibition will present the development of travel methods from the most primitive beginnings up to the modern times. It will show how Indians traveled on snow-shoes and on horses; how the pioneers used covered wagons and how mail was delivered in early times. It will show the way caravans travel over the desert; still used today by the Japanese; the modern steamer developing from a canoe, crudely fashioned by hollowing out a tree trunk and the development of airplanes.

    Furthermore,films will present the romance of traveling and the wonders of far away countries. Greenland and Italy, Belgium, Norway, Sweden, Germany, Denmark, Japan, the United States and other countries of the globe will be presented in word and pictures.

    Highly interesting materials were sent from Berlin to the Travel Exhibition, which will be held at the Stevens Hotel. Since over 350,000 Americans traveled abroad last year to study in ...

    German
    III H, II B 2 e, I C
  • Abendpost -- January 22, 1928
    German Clubs Are Shown Dr. Trent's Film.

    The film "Oh,My Homeland!" which Dr. Trent displayed yesterday, free of charge, at the luncheon of the German Club in the Morrison Hotel,received the grateful applause of the large audience with its wonderful pictures of the homeland. All were captivated. Dr. Trent intends to take up a collection for the benefit of the relief work of the society for Germans abroad, and he appealed on this occasion, in advance to those present to do their share.

    The film "Oh,My Homeland!" which Dr. Trent displayed yesterday, free of charge, at the luncheon of the German Club in the Morrison Hotel,received the grateful applause of the large audience ...

    German
    II B 2 e, II D 10, III B 2, III H
  • Abendpost -- May 11, 1928
    Flyers Will Be Guests of German-Americans.

    The hearts of a city of millions welcome the brave conquerors of the Atlantic who today are in our midst as the guests of Chicago. If there were thousands to greet the flyers yesterday there will be tens of thousands today to acclaim them on their tour through the city, and at the stadium in Grant Park.

    Baron von Hunefeld, Captain Koehl and Major Fitzmaurice are at last guests of Chicago. It has required many efforts to bring the flyers to the city. Everybody wants to see them, the daring ocean flyers, every one would like to congratulate them, every one would like to shake their hands.

    Particularly happy is the German element over their visit; thousands upon thousands of German descent will offer their greetings to the flyers, when they lay a wreath at the foot of the Goethe monument. In the evening they will go to the Lincoln Turner Hall and the North Side Turner Hall.

    Shortly before 1 o'clock the flyers will ride to the South Shore Country Club, where a luncheon will be given in their honor by the Mayor of Chicago.

    2

    After lunch a tour through the city is proposed which will take the flyers through the parks of the South and West sides to the Olson Rug Company, Diversey and Crawford Avenue. Here the flyers will dedicate the powerful beacon which is meant as a guide to aeroplanes. The light will receive the official name of "Bremenlight." The beacon which was furnished by Walter E. Olson, president of the firm, carries a searchlight of a million candle-power.

    The tour will be continued with a stop at the Goethe monument in Lincoln Park where a wreath will be laid. In the evening at 9 o'clock the flyers will go to the Lincoln Turner Hall. Here the chorus of the United Men's Chorus will greet them with the song "Harmony."

    Mr. C. F. Pegenan will receive and introduce them. All the events in the Lincoln Turner Hall, including the flyers' speeches, will be broadcast from Station W. I. B. O. on the Abendpost radio hour. The Turners will also be present at the reception. Leopold Saltiel, Adolph Gill and Bruno Knecht are members of the reception committee.

    In the North Side Turner Hall, where the Swabian Society, the Plattdeutsche Guilds, the German-American Citizens Union, the Mutual Friendly Society, the 3War Veterans, and the United Austro-Hungarian societies will await the flyers. William Jauss, honorary president of the Swabian Society will give the speech of welcome and present the flyers.

    The hearts of a city of millions welcome the brave conquerors of the Atlantic who today are in our midst as the guests of Chicago. If there were thousands to ...

    German
    III H, III B 2, II B 2 e, V A 1, II D 1, II E 3, III A, II C, IV
  • Abendpost -- October 24, 1929
    The German Radio Hour

    The radio exposition at the Coliseum, which is drawing such huge crowds, also serves to heighten the interest in the special attractions offered to the Germans. In the first place one might mention the German radio hour of Station WIBO, which has enjoyed great popularity for more than two years. As will be remembered, the program has been directed for the last sixteen months by Hermann F. Meyer, who has endeavored to provide selections appealing to different tastes. It has been his aim to give variety to the programs and also to satisfy our longing for the homeland. Last year he offered "German Musical Travels," giving graphic accounts of the various rural scenes in Germany; the accounts were interspersed with charming melodies and folk songs, poetry and music of the homeland. Many requests were received for additional journeys into new German districts and repetitions of the former imaginative travels.

    [Half-tone, one column-eighth of a page, portrait of Hermann Meyer is inserted, 2at this point.]

    Several German clubs of Chicago and vicinity recognize the value of the German hour and give due recognition to the ambitions of its director. These societies have offered their co-operation for the sake of the cause and are willing to appear on future programs. Since the beginning of the winter season several associations including song clerks and instrumental groups, have performed the preliminary work.

    As the first arrangement of this kind, a program sponsored by the well-known German Club of Chicago will be given next Sunday. Aside from popular singers, the climax is to be the "Farewell Scene" of "Hanne Nuette," as he leaves the pastor, taken from Fritz Reuter's classical work of the same name. A male quartette and five rectors will provide the cast. The president of the German Club, Oscar Stoffels, will give a short address and the orchestra will play delightful selections, thus providing a well-rounded program.

    Such promising entertainments will undoubtedly result in requests for many 3similar performances. The management of the German radio hour will gladly consider all written suggestions as far as possible.

    The radio exposition at the Coliseum, which is drawing such huge crowds, also serves to heighten the interest in the special attractions offered to the Germans. In the first place ...

    German
    II B 2 e, II B 1 c 1, II B 1 a
  • Abendpost -- October 30, 1929
    The Fate of German Films in Chicago (Editorial)

    Were it only a matter of an isolated instance instead of a common practice, and were the films considered here an inferior German product, then there would be no reason for writing about them in the editorial columns. The boycott of German films in Chicago has grown to such disgraceful proportions as to make us ponder about the fate of all the German pictures which passed the largest theaters of metropolitan New York with the most commending criticism. Here after appearing in small suburban theaters, they vanish through stage trap-doors into the nether world, at least so far as their further presentations are concerned. Considerable attention has been given to the fact that powerful theatrical concerns are intent in ignoring German films, regardless of their artistic value. Only in unavoidable 2cases, and apparently in compliance to the dictates of large distribution houses, have German celluloid creations been given admittance to the Loop. Otherwise, the large percentage of German art enthusiasts, who constitute a great part of Chicago's cinema public, have been given almost no consideration.

    The Chicago Germans are good supporters of picture houses, and this is a fact which no theater owner would deny. Millions of their dollars flow annually to our entertainment tycoons, and it is only right that their demand be satisfied occasionally. In Hollywood, where America is considered as a unit, a sort of bird's eye view of popular trends, these wishes are respected, and it is here that there is no discrimination against German subjects, artists, or music. Proof of this is the fact that they are making preparations at present to produce large American films with German dialogues and songs, for consumption in Milwaukee, Chicago, Cleveland, and Cincinnati. These films will be available in their 3English version, then they are rephotographed in their entirety with the German text.

    Obviously, Hollywood, with business uppermost in mind, recognizes the German-American's sentiments. The Chicago theaters, however, display a certain reluctance to select pictures that appeal to the Germans.

    The following is an example: The UFA film "Hungarian Rhapsody," a masterpiece of German creation and manufacture, which was tumultuously acclaimed by the New York public and the press, and which only first-class theaters presented, reached several months ago and was shown to a critic of the Abendpost, who fully concurred with the New York newspaper fraternity. Despite its artistic value, 4this film found no acceptance among Chicago's largest houses, so that it had to be given to an independent Loop theater that caters zealously to the German interests. Here the picture was shown, but nothing developed. Inquiries at the management disclosed that a large Chicago concert hall had accepted the film for a first showing in Chicago. Then followed another lapse, after which the large hall released the film to a suburban theater on the North Side. It is through these maneuvers that a film of great drawing power in New York, a recognized classical work of undeniable artistry, is relegated to Chicago's outskirts.

    It is about time that Chicago's large Teutonic population asserts itself in the matter of German films. We must remember that these theaters, after all, are largely dependent on the Germans for their income.

    Were it only a matter of an isolated instance instead of a common practice, and were the films considered here an inferior German product, then there would be no reason ...

    German
    I C, II B 2 e
  • Sonntagpost -- November 03, 1929
    Chicago Theaters Opposed to German Films The Banished "Hungarian Rhapsody"

    Here is a film which belongs among the best of the German productions. "Hungarian Rhapsody" is its title, and a Hungarian rhapsody are the scenes, the action, the people and the music whose leitmotif is provided by Franz Liszt's compositions. A film undoubtedly of international importance, reminiscent of the best Swedish works, marked with a humor whose effect would not be lost even upon New England, replete with scenic splendors which captivate everyone.

    New York film critics of both the German and English press were warm in their praises of this work, which the director Hanns Schwarz has marked with the stamp of living distinction; a work which has provided the proof that the U. F. A. producer, Erich Pommer, who was so disappointed in Hollywood, knows more about films than he is given credit for in the American film paradise.

    2

    De facto: (sic): Pommer shows the Hollywood crowd how to produce films.

    Films which have nothing in common with those shabby, cheaply made productions which are turned out by the dozen. Films which have quality. Films such as Murnau began to make, when the talking-picture rage in Hollywood drove out the finest exponents of film art. Films which do not have to rely on the shrillness of our modern talking-pictures in order to retain the waning interest of the masses. Films which even Charlie Chaplin likes to see.....

    The small Bugg theater--small in comparison with the large Loop play-houses--was packed with people who came to do homage to a great German film production. In the midst of their enthusiasm, these people asked, in astonishment, how is it possible that such a film is not shown in the large theaters. This picture was a success throughout the world, and even the hardboiled New York critics praised it as a masterpiece. But in Chicago it is banished to 3the suburbs. And this happens in Chicago, where it is said there are six hundred thousand Germans and a hundred thousand Hungarians. This happens in our city, which has always been regarded as a great German-American center.

    How is it possible? An editorial in the Abendpost of October 30, 1929 gives the answer. That article can also explain to our present readers what our theater owners think of their German and Hungarian paying customers.

    The Fate of German Films in Chicago

    [Translator's Note.--At this point in the present article the editorial is reproduced. Since this editorial has been previously translated (cf. Abendpost of October 13, 1929), the translation will not be repeated here.]

    Here is a film which belongs among the best of the German productions. "Hungarian Rhapsody" is its title, and a Hungarian rhapsody are the scenes, the action, the people and ...

    German
    I D 1 b, II B 2 e, I D 1 a, I C
  • Abendpost -- March 30, 1930
    For the German Theatre

    The editor of the Sonntagpost received the following announcement from Mr. R. G. Scheunemann:

    The German Artists Theatre Corporation of America will erect theaters in all cities with a large German colony. The first of these theatres will be opened September, 1930 in Chicago. At this theatre daily performances of German operettas, dramas, comedies, and imported German talkies will be shown. Prominent German actors will be engaged and there will be given also guest performances of celebrities such as Alexander Moissi.

    The latest talkie of the well known U F A German Film-Corporation, and Tobiss and Klang films will be shown at the premiere of this theatre. The public will be informed of the different performances by means of modern theatrical advertisements.

    The German Artists Theatre Corporation of America will be incorporated to 2place German theatres upon an American business basis, which has been tried and found successful everywhere. The capital will be $100,000, divided in 10,000 original shares of $10 each. These shares are offered at present to the German-Americans in Chicago. After $50,000 of the shares are signed, a petition to form a corporation will be submitted, and when the corporation is in force under the laws of the State of Illinois, the subscribers will be notified by mail so that they may take over their number of shares and deposit the amount due for them. After the deposits are received a general meeting will be called at which the shareholders will elect the board of directors of the corporation. The legal matters of the corporation will be taken care of by the well known attorneys Walter W. L. Meyer and Otto C. Reutner.

    To prevent mistakes it is herewith specially emphasized that the German Artists Theatre Corporation of America does not intend to create a competing enterprise against the present German theatre of Chicago; on the contrary, 3the successful artist and director of this theatre, Mr. Angelo Lippich, is considered for the position of director of the German Artists Theatre Corporation of America.

    The editor of the Sonntagpost received the following announcement from Mr. R. G. Scheunemann: The German Artists Theatre Corporation of America will erect theaters in all cities with a large ...

    German
    II B 1 c 1, II B 2 e, II A 2, IV