The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 10, 1861
    A Weighty Voice for the Suppression of Slavery America's Most Prominent Catholic Writer Advocates the Abolition of Slavery (Editorial)

    Who among our people has not heard of Orestes Brownson, the genial editor of "Quarterly Review," the most important organ of the Catholic Church in America? Until a short time ago Mr. Brownson was averse to abolition. However, several months ago, he declared himself in favor of the principle of restricting slavery, and in the latest issue of his journal he advocates the outright abolition of slavery.

    He advances the following reasons for his new stand on the issue:

    "Hitherto I have opposed abolition because of my love for the Constitution; for I believe that more stress should be placed on the preservation of 2peace in America and the whole world, and on the safety of the Union with its Constitution, than on the abolition of slavery in the Southern States. But now I am convinced that slavery must be abolished in order to suppress the rebellion; indeed, we must abolish slavery to defend the Union, our liberty, and our form of government!

    "We have but one alternative," declares Mr. Brownson, "and this is especially true of our laboring class: either we must subdue the rebels, or the rebels will subdue free laborers. Either we must annihilate the Southern Confederacy, or it will force its rule upon the free states and reduce their laborers to serfdom. In that case freedom in non-slave states would be restricted to a privileged class, but our working classes would be deprived of their liberty and would be placed on the same level with the plantation slaves of the South. Then, instead of a Christian Republic founded on human rights as our fathers intended, we would have a heathen government founded on slavery, which is directly opposed to Christianity."

    3

    Mr. Brownson warns against taking this War too lightly. "Who is not for us in this crisis is against us," he says, "and must be treated as an enemy. The very existence of the nation is at stake. Since no means are being spared to destroy it, in accordance with the law of self-preservation we have the right to use any means necessary to preserve it. This War cannot be carried on successfully as long as we treat the Southern Rebels as friends and allow them all advantages, instead of harming them as much as possible. The Rebels are using all their power to subject us; therefore we must employ all our strength and resources to subdue them.

    "The slave population of the South is a natural means of overthrowing the South. The three million slaves of the South are a component part of the people of the United States; they owe our Government loyalty, but they are also entitled to the protection of the Federal Government.

    "The Government of the United States has the right not only to arm the whites in west Virginia and East Tennessee, but also to make friends and allies of 4the slaves, to equip them with guns and swords, and to put them in the armed forces of the country. It is of no consequence that these people have heretofore been slaves in the respective states according to law and custom; for the laws and customs of these states have been invalidated through the act of rebellion. All laws for the defense of the life and property of the Rebels have been repealed by the rebellion; the rebellion has deprived the Rebels of the right to live and to possess property. If that were not a fact, the Government of the United States would have no right to suppress the rebellion by force of arms, or to confiscate the property of the Rebels.

    "If the slaves are not considered as property, they are citizens of the United States, they owe the Federal Government loyalty, they are duty-bound to serve the Government, and, like all other loyal citizens, they are entitled to the protection of the United States.

    "If the United States was ever constrained to regard the Negroes of the 5South as slaves, that obligation was terminated by the rebellion and the Government must now accord the Negroes the rights and consideration due all free men, thereby removing the cause for the rebellion, slavery.

    "And if the slaves of the Rebel states are to be looked upon as chattel, the Government has the right to confiscate them just as it may confiscate the rice, cotton, or other property of the Rebels. This right is based on the Confiscation Act which was adopted by Congress August 4.

    "The argument that the suppression of slavery would estrange West Virginia And East Tennessee from the Union, and make enemies of Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri is anything but tenable; for it was just this eternal consideration for the South that misled the Government into following the detrimental policy of taking half measures. Fear is the most ignorant counselor, and a government which is reluctant to follow the best policy, fearing that friends who object to the procedure might be estranged, is lost. The boundary between friend and enemy must be well defined. In a crisis 6like the present one, lukewarm friends and they who are our friends only when we make concessions in behalf of their interests or give way to their prejudices, are worse than open enemies. Shall the Northern States sacrifice their lives and property merely to satisfy the pretensions of the slaveholders in Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri? That would be unjust and unreasonable. The slaveholders of Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri are as deeply obligated to sacrifice their slave property for the welfare of the Union as the Northern States are to sacrifice themselves and their possessions to quell the Rebels. Besides, loyal slaveholders could be reimbursed for any losses which they might suffer through granting their slaves freedom."

    As we note from Tuesday's issue of the New York Herald, which was delivered to us last evening, Archbishop Hughes felt duty-bound to offer a strong protest against this masterful article of Mr. Brownson. We shall comment on this protest tomorrow.

    Who among our people has not heard of Orestes Brownson, the genial editor of "Quarterly Review," the most important organ of the Catholic Church in America? Until a short time ...

    German
    I J, II B 2 d 2, III C, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 30, 1867
    For Tradesmen, Mechanics, and Artists "The Patent Law of the United States," and the "Scientific Americans" are two of the best illustrated periodicals for mechanics.

    Eduard Buehler,

    Book Store and Rental Library,

    lll Monroe Street.

    [Translator's note: This advertisement was translated because of the reference to a rental library. From all appearances this was one of the first rental libraries in the city of Chicago, if not the first. After having exhausted all sources of research available at Newberry Library, I find no information that a rental library existed here prior to the year 1867. Probably Mr. Buehler had books on mechanics which were not to be had on the local market, but which were in great demand at the time, and found it more profitable to rent them for a consideration than to sell them.]

    Eduard Buehler, Book Store and Rental Library, lll Monroe Street. [Translator's note: This advertisement was translated because of the reference to a rental library. From all appearances this was one ...

    German
    II A 2, II B 2 d 2, II B 2 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 13, 1873
    [A New Comic Periodical]

    The Eulenspiegel, a comic paper published by Moritz Langeloth, will appear next Saturday for the first time. We quote from the editorial:

    "Let it be said, once for all, that the character of private people will not be spoken of in the Eulenspiegel. As gladly as we accept for our paper communications which deal with matters of general interest, we shall assign communications of any other type to the waste basket."

    Only when guided by such principles will a comic paper be able to be successful.

    The Eulenspiegel, a comic paper published by Moritz Langeloth, will appear next Saturday for the first time. We quote from the editorial: "Let it be said, once for all, that ...

    German
    II B 2 d 2
  • Chicago Times -- October 03, 1873
    A German Weekly.

    Trump is the title of a German illustrated weekly paper, semi-comic in its nature that made its appearance in this city yesterday. It is published by Hon Edward Runnel, Esq. Allowing for the usual drawbacks incident to an initial publication Trump makes its appearance in a taking shape and in receiving many ecomiums.

    The title page illustrates the title. About a table are seated a monarch, a priest, and a bondholder. The former plays a card with a crown and scepter, the priest plays are marked with a cross, the bondholder presents are marked "bonds" Liberty, standing erect, plays the ace of spades represented by the national shield, labelled "Liberty" That is trumpo. A happy illustration is one entitled" The farmers' war; The Grangers Crossing the track of Monopoly."

    The literary features are poems by Mr. Binder and Emil Dietzsch.

    Trump is the title of a German illustrated weekly paper, semi-comic in its nature that made its appearance in this city yesterday. It is published by Hon Edward Runnel, Esq. ...

    German
    II B 2 d 2
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- January 30, 1883
    The Central Committee's Session.

    The Central Committee's Session at which comrade Bluhm presided was held last night. Representatives of different clubs gave their reports. Comrade Schwab called to attention the proposed selling of pamphlets and Comrade Spies asked for a loan of $20.00 for the purchase of literature in question. Mr. Schwab was entrusted with the management of this. The centralization for the sale of such was recommended. The South side club asked the management of the Socialist Publishing Society, to employ as newsboys only those who are members of one of the clubs.

    The newly established Bohemian Club sent two representatives, to ask the Central Committee to send a delegation to view their new club.

    A committee of Messrs. Spies, Livoni and Schwab was appointed to visit and report on the new club. Comrade Winnen proposed to abolish the paying of taxes by clubs separately. This will be discussed at the next meeting. Concerning the question of agitation literature several proposals were made and accepted. It was decided, to have the Communist manifesto and LaSalle's "Right and Power" and "About the Constitution" appear in English. The question what the connection of the "Lehr and Wehr Verein" to the Socialist party is, shall be discussed by each club.

    The Central Committee's Session at which comrade Bluhm presided was held last night. Representatives of different clubs gave their reports. Comrade Schwab called to attention the proposed selling of pamphlets ...

    German
    I E, II B 2 d 2, II B 2 g, I C, IV
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- April 17, 1883
    The Central Committee.

    The Central Committee held its meeting last night with Comrade W. Blum presiding. Concerning the wholesale murder at Braidwood, Comrade Spies reported that he took up contacts with various unions in order to induce all the workers to action in this highly important matter. The apathy which he encountered everywhere, however, had disheartened him. It was then moved and resolved to let this matter rest. Mr. Schwab reported that a certain Julius Mark presented the library with a number of valuable books. The delegates from different groups reported an increase of membership. The Bohemian delegates asked for advice concerning Bohemian Tailors and other shops employing girls 10-12 years of age, working 10-12 hours a day which means a systematic ruination for these children. (Advice was given). Resolved to send $15.00 to Comrade Justus Schwab of New York and urge the publication of the Communist Manifasto printed in English.

    The publication in German will commence this week. The elected officials are: August Spies, Secretary; Michel Schwab, librarian; Mittlacher was appointed auditor replacing the resigning Schernig. B. Rau replaces Rosenberg as a member of the agitation committee which will call a general meeting, with the purpose of officially discussing the relief money sent to Germany.

    The Central Committee held its meeting last night with Comrade W. Blum presiding. Concerning the wholesale murder at Braidwood, Comrade Spies reported that he took up contacts with various unions ...

    German
    I E, IV, I C, II B 2 g, II B 2 d 2, I H
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- April 12, 1884
    [Socialist Meeting]

    The General Committee of the I. A.A. held its regular meeting, presided by Comrade Kalbitz, yesterday evening.

    The minutes of last meeting were read and accepted. New delegates were received; From "Lehr and Wehrverein" A. Hirschberger; from the "North Side" Edward Schnaubelt and John Faist; from the "North West Side" Fricke and W. Blume. The Groups "Vorwarts" South West Side No. 1 and "Einigkeit" were not represented. Group South West side No. 2, has joined Group South West Side No. 3. The Groups "Nordseite" Bruderlichkeit"; Nordwestside," "Freiheit"; "Sudseit", "Sudwestseite No. 3"; "Bridgeport" and Town of Lake" report progress; also that the resolutions of the General Committees last meeting were approved. Group "Nordseite" celebrated its 2d anniversary, Saturday, May 17th, in the North Side Turnhall and invites all the other groups to this event. The surplus will be used for agitation purposes. Group "Freiheit" changed its location to 54 W. Lake Street (Greifs Hall) where an evening entertainment will be held on April 20th, to which all Comrades are invited.

    2

    The Agitation Committee reports that the pamphlets which threw light upon the "mistakes" of the workers convention was sent to Press and 5000 copies, to cost $20.00, will be printed. The librarian, Comrade Schwab, read a letter from Zurich, Switzerland, which states that several publications ordered by us, are on the way, and that in the near future a collection of revolutionary songs will be published and same are highly recommended to our attention.

    To acquire these books, $50 was appropriated. The present value of the library is $300. A proposition: To elect a committee to promote the arming of the people was accepted. Elected were Comrades Polling, Edward Schnaubelt, Hermann, Schroeder and Blume.

    The General Committee of the I. A.A. held its regular meeting, presided by Comrade Kalbitz, yesterday evening. The minutes of last meeting were read and accepted. New delegates were received; ...

    German
    I E, II B 2 d 2, III H, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 21, 1885
    [Early Efforts to Incorporate the German Language in the American Public Schools]

    The first groups of German immigrants came to America when Germany was in a state of poverty, desolation and demoralization, and therefore did not bring with them a lively interest for intellectual progress.

    There have been sporadic efforts by German teachers and preachers, who came from Germany to introduce German instruction permanently into American public schools. These efforts often failed, particularly during and after the American Civil War, 1860-1864, which engulfed the whole interest of the entire population in the United States.

    Finally in August 1880, a group of 170 German-American teachers founded the first German-American Teachers Association. The latter undertook the task of improving the whole American public school system parallel to German educational program, which was expressed subsequently, in a teachers' 2newspaper, the Deutsche Sohul Zeitung (German School Journal). Of course there have been many obstacles and enemies to the preservation of the German instruction, as shown by the recorded reports of German-American Teachers' Convention, which have been held annually.

    With all the ups and downs, experienced by the sponsors of the German instruction, the latter do not today present a very encouraging picture. Even today, most children of German parantage do not receive any German instruction. In fact, the mass of the population show no interest to speak of concerning the subject of educational problems, and particularly that of the German language, the preservation of which is confined to small groups of patriotic Germans. If the emigration keeps up from Germany, we shall dare to hope, that sometime in the future, the German-American elements will organize more solidly towards a happy future and permanent home for the German language in this country.

    The first groups of German immigrants came to America when Germany was in a state of poverty, desolation and demoralization, and therefore did not bring with them a lively interest ...

    German
    I A 1 b, II B 2 d 2, II A 1, I F 4, III G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 26, 1887
    [Pastor Hartmann Dead]

    Pastor Joseph Hartmann succumbed, yesterday, after a short illness, at the home of his daughter. The great loss is felt not only by his family but by his parishioners in whose welfare he was deeply interested. The poorer class has lost a faithful friend and helper, the Evangelical Church of America one of its most prominent representatives, and the city of Chicago a noble citizen. Pastor Hartmann was born September 18th, 1823 at Bornheim in the Bavarian Rheinpfalz. Showing a very keen intellect, in his youth, the clerical profession was chosen for him and he soon entered the Latin School at Speyer for the intended educacation. Later he attended the college at Zweibrucken and had the distinction of being its model student. He studied philosophy and theology at the Universities of Bonn and Utrecht in Holland, in both of which he soon was recognized as an excellent orator and chosen by the latter student body as its president and official speaker. Showing distinctly his partisanship during the year 1848, he knew that Germany wouldn't require his services and therefore, decided with his young wife, Eva, to make America a future home. The officials of the United Synod at Cleveland examined and ordained him. His first position 2was at Constableville, New York, and he was worshipped by the members of the community. In 1851 he was called to St. Paul's Evangelical Community of Chicago, to succeed the Pastor, Dr. Fischer, arriving at his post November 18th, 1851. His brilliant sermons were so magnetic, that the little church soon proved too small for so many hundreds of people anxious to attend services on Sunday. The result was that in 1854 a big and beautiful church, the first to be built of brick in Chicago, replaced the little church. Soon this church also proved too small and he began, with that admirable energy of his, to build schools on the south west and the west sides and, later, even began to build independent communities. Pastor Hartmann contributed greatly to the development of the Evangelical church in the west, and consecrated not less than forty two churches. At the outbreak of the Civil War Pastor Hartmann was one of the first to defend from the pulpit, and also in the periodical Der Hansfreund which he managed, the abolition of slavery and the cause of the union. To soften the heart ache caused by the death of members of the immediate family, he took a trip to Europe financed by members of the community and participated at the dedication of the Luther monument at Worms. After his return to this country, he erected an orphan's home known as the Uhlich Orphan's 3Home. The funds used were from the generous legacy of Mr. Uhlich. THe great fire of 1871 destroyed his church and home also, but the height of his suffering was reached in March, 1873, when his highly intellectual daughter, Amanda, met with an untimely death. Pastor Hartmann celebrated on November 18th, 1876, his 25th anniversary as Pastor of St. Paul's community. This celebration was attended by a multitude of people from all over the country. With the year 1885 his health began to decline and the community, which felt so indebted to him, granted him a handsome pension. His death was a heavy blow to all of us

    Pastor Joseph Hartmann succumbed, yesterday, after a short illness, at the home of his daughter. The great loss is felt not only by his family but by his parishioners in ...

    German
    IV, II B 2 d 2, II D 4, III C, III H, I H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 20, 1891
    The German American Library.

    The "Germania Male Chorus", which has done much in the last year to further German interests, now appears with a new plan, which is so exceptionally laudable, that it will not fail to arouse lively interest throughout all German-American circles. The association proposes nothing less, than the founding of a German-American library. However, as the following two letters give full details about this splendid idea, we publish them herewith, without comment.

    "Germania Male Chorus. Chicago, April 15, 1891. To Messrs. Joseph Baucker, Washington Hesing and Frederick Hild. Gentlemen! The club's secretary will probably have given you notice in regard to your nomination as members of the Library Committee, so it may not be necessary to recapitualte here, except that I had a special purpose in mind, when I suggested your names to the Board of Executives of the Germania Maennerchor (Male Chorus).

    As you know, for a year the Germania has subscribed to the principle, that a powerful, German-American club like ours, has a higher task to fulfill, than to function merely as an assembly which satisfies the social demands of its members, 2and this motto is not only found in our support of art during the grand artistic club productions, but includes our participation in all branches of the club's activity. According to my opinion, we now have an exceptional opportunity, by founding a club library. It is evident of course, that our goal cannot be a general race with the large book collections of the land. However, we have a good chance in achieving something, in so far as we may try to fill the large gaps in the American libraries and, at the same time, we function in conformance with the ideal sense of a German-American club.

    I need not tell you, that in the history of the Germans in the United States, from the very first period of its colonization until the present day, many a pearl of intellectuality lays scattered about, which will be doomed to oblivion if not properly gathered and preserved. As far as I know, no such attempt has ever been made, namely, to make a collection of all the literature in our language, which has been published in the United States, from the first days of the German immigration to the present era; at least in the west, no such work has ever been performed, or satisfactorily accomplished. In regard to the attainments of the German daily newspapers, all their noteworthy deeds for the perpetuation of our customs and language, however valuable they have been and always will be, such an edition we 3cannot include at present at least, because of its voluminous size. But it is within the realm of possibility to procure everything, which the German mind has conceived in this land and put into book form, this we may gather little by little and so preserve it for posterity. Aside from the great historical value of such a collection, it has a tendency to convince the German-American about the spiritual importance of his element, it will strengthen him in his competitive endeavors with other people, by giving him that necessary self respect.

    The administration is prepared to supply you with the necessary means for the realization of this work, and awaits your valued reply, whether you consider this briefly described plan as feasible and desirable, also, if you are willing to participate in your capacity as member of the committee.

    Very respectfully, Harry Rubens, President."

    To this communication the following reply was received: "Chicago, Ill. April 16, 1891. To the President of the Germania Maennerchor, Harry Rubens. Esteemed Sir! Your valuable letter reached me, today, and I hasten to inform you, that I am not only 4pleasedto co-operate, as befits the duties of the chairman of the library committee concerning which I have notified the club's secretary, but it gives me extraordinary pleasure to do my very best, to help realize your idea, the procurement of a specifically German-American library in our club.

    The German-American is unaware of his full importance regarding the past and is not sufficiently conversant with his cultural political problems of the present. The latter belongs to the German-American press. In order to bring the glorious past to his knowledge, he will find it is imperative to peruse history, but to successfully conclude such a study without the help of a large library is unthinkable. The accomplished German-American historian, H. A. Rattermann (German-American Magazine, folio 4, page 515) remarks: "To speak is silver, but silence is golden!" A well known proverb..... We have been silent until all the gold and silver in history has been distributed to all the others and we remain with empty hands. Yet, golden were the German deeds when the cultural development of this land is considered.... It is time.... we should speak of our achievements as German-Americans....until history gives us our deserved recognition...

    5

    Very well, we shall not only speak of the accomplishments of our forefathers, we shall garner them for the present and preserve them for the future.....From private collections....among dealers of antiquities...from publishers.... by appeals to the German press to support our cause,.... with the assistance of Mr. Hesing nad Mr. Hild as committee members,.... by asking for advice and suggestions of such eminent German-American historians as Oswald, Seidensticker, Rattermann, G. Koerner, just to mention a few,....we gladly labor for the beginning of the great work which you visualized and created.... Very respectfully Joseph Brucker."

    The "Germania Male Chorus", which has done much in the last year to further German interests, now appears with a new plan, which is so exceptionally laudable, that it will ...

    German
    II B 2 a, II B 2 d 1, II B 2 d 2, II B 2 d 3, II B 1 a, III A, III F