The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- July 22, 1882
    Music (Chicago's Opera-Society)

    A large number of music lovers gathered yesterday afternoon at, Weber's Saloon, to listen to Mr. Will Davis and Prof. Liesegang's proposals, in connection with the establishment of an amateur opera school for Chicago.

    A committee of the following persons has been appointed: Fred Root, W. H. Clark, H. F. Starbuck, Samuel Kayser, Joseph M. Goodwillie, John Mc Wade and Adolph Liesegang.

    This committee's duty consists of drafting a plan for statutes and instructions.

    A large number of music lovers gathered yesterday afternoon at, Weber's Saloon, to listen to Mr. Will Davis and Prof. Liesegang's proposals, in connection with the establishment of an amateur ...

    German
    II A 3 b, II B 2 b, II B 1 a
  • Abendpost -- July 27, 1892
    The German House.

    The German house of the World's Fair in Chicago as center and representative house of the German Empire, will be built on a location near the lake, and very close to the one of Great Britain. Its size is estimated at 32,000 square feet. The government's architect, Mr.Radke, has drawn the plans. Architect Fiedler Living in Chicago for some time, together with the German Consul Buentz are supervising the erection of the building. Adjoining the main building will be a chapel in the late Gothic style, where exhibits will be shown of Christian art. The main building will have all the offices and a hall for the meetings of the visiting Germans, also special exhibits of German art, industry and inventions may be shown. The building will be of wood, which has been cut in Germany and will be transported over here. Several firms have supplied cut wood free of charge. The decorations of the exhibition room will be done under the supervisions of architect Haffarker and architect Radke. The illustrated magazines will soon be in the position to publish the plans.

    The German house of the World's Fair in Chicago as center and representative house of the German Empire, will be built on a location near the lake, and very close ...

    German
    II B 2 b, II B 1 c 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 17, 1900
    A Magnanimous Offer

    Alderman C. F. Gunther announced his intention to donate to the City of Chicago his entire collection of civil war relics. This collection with other curiosities form an exhibit which is the only one of its kind in the United States.

    But this exquisite gift has to be housed in a building yet to be erected. The stipulation was that a museum at the cost of about $100,000 should be built in Garfield Park. The Libby Prison exhibition, is also included in his collection.

    Alderman C. F. Gunther announced his intention to donate to the City of Chicago his entire collection of civil war relics. This collection with other curiosities form an exhibit which ...

    German
    II B 2 b, IV
  • Abendpost -- March 04, 1907
    Carl Schurz Memorial Society.

    The National Carl Schurz Memorial Society, which was formed soon after the death of the famed German-American, and which has its main office in New York with branches in Chicago, St. Louis, Milwankee, Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia, and Boston has just given details of their plans.

    The first is the erection of a memorial to the value of $250,000 of which $40,000 have been signed for by some friends of the deceased. The society however will not stop with the erection of the dead statue of stone, but will act in the spirit of the dead by effective agitation of the civil service system, a movement of Which the dead was the chief for many years, the development of the German movement in the United States of America of which Mr. Schurz was a busy agitator as President of the German Museums Society, the Harvard University and Vice President of the German Society of New York.

    2

    The permanent retention of his name in Hampton, which is dedicated to the volution of two races, for which he has worked officially and privately during his lifetime, was especially sponsored by the executive committee. In Hampton, Carl Schurz, as Secretary of the Interior made his first successful experiments with the education of the Indians, which led to the present system of government schools with their civilized influence. It was his wish in the last years of his life to contribute to a proper installment of such institution and it is the plan of this society to accomplish these wishes. The former American ambassador at the English Court, Joseph H. Choate is the Chairman and the Banker, Isaac N. Seligman, is the Secretary of the National Society. Mr. Wilhelm Bocke is Chairman and Mr Otto E. Schneider, Secretary of the Chicago branch. The Milwaukee branch will erect a memorial themselves and after completion they will participare on the National movement in honor of Carl Schurz. The Society will also honor Schurz's activity for the development of the Negro and Indian races by the erection of a suitable building or in other suitable manner in the institution of Hampton, Va.

    The National Carl Schurz Memorial Society, which was formed soon after the death of the famed German-American, and which has its main office in New York with branches in Chicago, ...

    German
    II C, III B 2, III B 3 a, II B 2 b, I J
  • Abendpost -- November 08, 1925
    German Spirit Building a Museum of Science in This Country.

    A typical German with graying whiskers, highly intelligent features, modest in his disposition, that is Dr. Oscar von Miller, one of the spiritually great men of Germany. Important American industrialists brought him over as a guest, in order that he should build a museum of technical science, after the pattern of the one built by him in Munich, which is unique of its kind.

    Dr. von Miller is for the present a guest of Samuel Insull and Rufus Dawes. Yesterday afternoon he was a guest of honor in the German Club. Introduced by president A. F. W. Siebel, he addressed those present in a short speech: "It gives me great pleasure to spend an hour in the company of men and women of German descent. I was in America for the first time 42 years ago, and again 13 years ago, also in the beautiful city of Chicago. But what great progress the latter has made in commerce and industry, and also culturally. Therefore I congratulate you for living in a country where means can be found and the ways are open to make yourselves useful and to participate in its upbuilding. It was difficult for Germans after the war to regain their old position, but I do not doubt that they 2will be successful. Forty-two years ago, I was, with Karl Schurz, a guest of Henry Villard in New York, the builder of the Northern Pacific R. R. and at that time there were many Germans to whom the Americans looked up with admiration and I do not doubt that the time will come when this will again be the case.

    "During the war, when we all were starving, and we did not know where we could get bread for our children, you helped us. Should America ever experience hard times, we shall help her, even if not with money, because we are very poor, but with deeds. And in the meantime we prove to the world, that the German culture still exists, and that the whole world must be grateful to Germany for what she accomplished. I only want to mention the German discovery of the remedy against sleeping sickness which will save the lives of thousands of people. Our old enemies, the French and Belgians, were the first who procured this remedy.

    "In many other domains, has Germany won first place, and became a path breaker on the domain of the dirigibles and aeroplanes. Its planes fly from London to Italy, to Sweden, Russia and Persia. The German flying net is spread all over. I only desire to mention one other domain, the building of the museum for 3science and technic in Munich. It is the largest in the world, its passages are nine miles long. The whole German nation lent its assistance, all classes. Great scientists like Emil Fischer, Rontgen, great artists, great industrialists supplying all building materials, and even the artisans, because they refused to accept pay for their work on Saturday afternoons and Sundays, and all this in spite of great need! It is German work, and in the small city of Munich, not one third as large as Chicago, 6,000 people visit this museum daily, and 12,000 on Sundays. Of course there are a good many foreigners among them.

    "In New York and Washington, an executive committee has been formed for the purpose of building a similar museum, and I was asked to assist the committee with my experience." The celebrated guest concluded amidst great applause. And still another enjoyment was offered to those present. Mr. Otto F. Reich showed a number of beautiful pictures from his latest European trip like the Steamer Deutschland, Cajutes, landing in Kuxhaven, Alster pavillion, Sans Souci, the Zoo, palaces in Berlin and Potsdam, Dresden, Nuremberg, Munich, Castle of Heidelberg, tower in Bingen on the Rhine, Cologne cathedral, Munich court brewery, promenade square, Innsbruck, Bavarian Alps, the Dolomites, Naples, Rome, Lucerne, etc, etc. And the speaker attested how energetically Germany is 4working, how modest and friendly the people are, its love for flowers and music, etc.

    Mr. Wolfgang Wittich, lyric tenor formerly with the Leipzig Opera, at present member of the "Gypsy Love" Operetta troup, sang "Musicians Love", "Ardent Love" and a few more German folk songs accompanied by Messrs. Fritz Renk and Otto Beyer. They were excellent performances, as were those of the Renk trio, who played during the supper.

    A typical German with graying whiskers, highly intelligent features, modest in his disposition, that is Dr. Oscar von Miller, one of the spiritually great men of Germany. Important American industrialists ...

    German
    III B 2, III H, II B 2 b, II A 3 b, I C, I G, IV
  • Abendpost -- June 27, 1930
    Kuno Francke (Editorial)

    Professor Kuno Francke, who died at an old age in Cambridge, Massachusetts, personified in his person the best type of those German scholars who preach the gospel of German science and culture in foreign countries.

    His actual life-work fell in the pre-war period, in those times, when - politically - a very friendly relation prevailed between the United States and Germany, when in the best American circles the understanding for the achievements of the German spirit began to awaken. These conditions and these moods formed the background and the preliminaries for Kuno Franck's life-work. Therefore, the entrance of the United States into the World War was a terrible blow to him.

    2

    He was a scholar, and thanks to his extended studies he mastered the German cultural life of the time beginning with the reformation until the present time. He looked with clear eyes into the world and represented the view-point, that a professor should submerge himself with devotion not only into the book of the past, but should have understanding and interest also for the demands of the present time. From this point of view, he considered it his life-work to establish a spiritual approach between Germanism and Americanism. This aim he had in view during his many years of teaching activity as professor of Harvard University, at the creation of the Germanic Museum, and at the carrying out of the interchange of professors between America and Germany. During these endeavors, he found in Theodore Roosevelt and Emperor William appreciative and enthusiastic promoters.

    3

    It is clear, that the outbreak of the bloody conflict between the two nations hit him with terrific force. But in spite of it, Kuno Francke did not despair. He knew he had not built upon sand; that his life-work rested upon a solid and real foundation; that a spiritual approach between the German and the American spirit could probably be interrupted by war, but could not be destroyed. In this belief and in this confidence he wrote his last work, which points out to Germans, Americans and German-Americans, the new path to the future.

    Kuno Francke was strongly attacked by those Germen-Americans, whose aim it was to organize the masses. To them he did not withhold his answer; and probably all agree to-day that his apprehension was clearer and that he judged things more correctly, than they did.

    4

    He was no agitator and demagogue; but one who among the distinguished personalities, developing in Americans an understanding of the German spirit and German culture, will always occupy an honorable place.

    Professor Kuno Francke, who died at an old age in Cambridge, Massachusetts, personified in his person the best type of those German scholars who preach the gospel of German science ...

    German
    V A 2, II B 2 b, III H, I C, I G
  • Abendpost -- October 09, 1934
    German Art Honored at the Art Institute

    The German Day at the Art Institute, which was celebrated yesterday with an impressive ceremony in the Fullerton Gallery, fully achieved its purpose, to honor German art. As the German Consul General, Dr. R. L. Jaeger, remarked in his short speech, German art was not adequately represented in the great exhibition at the Art Institute, where pictures from all countries of the world were assembled, although the management of the exhibition had tried to obtain a larger collection of German pictures. The situation in the Reich was not favorable for the assembling of a representative collection of German pictures and sculptures for the Worlds Fair; hence only a fraction of German art came to Chicago. Consul General Jaeger expressed the hope that perhaps, at a later time, a more extensive exhibition of German art of all periods might be shown in America, and especially in Chicago. He thanked the Art Institute for the pains it had taken in bringing together the German collection. The secretary of the Art Institute, Carl Buckholder, had already welcomed the guests.

    2

    The principal speaker of the occasion was Professor George L. Scherger, who with the help of photographs, gave a clear survey of German art from its first beginnings up to the present. For his excellent performance, which surely will make for a better understanding of German art, the speaker was rewarded with hearty applause. The music of Harry Koenigsmann and the splendid dances of Erika Thimey also met with the lively approval of the sophisticated audience.

    The Art Institute had suggested the festival, but the arrangements were put into the hands of the Deutsche Kunstgesellscihaft (German Art Society) by Consul General Jaeger. This society deserves the credit for the success of the German Day at the Art Institute.

    The German Day at the Art Institute, which was celebrated yesterday with an impressive ceremony in the Fullerton Gallery, fully achieved its purpose, to honor German art. As the German ...

    German
    II A 3 c, II B 2 b, III H, IV