The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 13, 1877
    Masquerade of the Chicago Turngemeinde.

    The masquerade of the Chicago Turngemeinde was the greatest festival of the year so far. Its greatest attraction was the representation of the cycle of Niebelungen. Picture 1 represented Rheingold. Picture 2 represented Walkure. Picture 3 represented Siegfried. Picture 4 represented the Dawn of the gods. Picture 5 represented the apparition of Prince Carnival.

    The carnival procession was most successful. The wagons of the gods were magnificently decorated. The Chicago Turngemeinde can look back with pride upon last night's entertainment.

    The masquerade of the Chicago Turngemeinde was the greatest festival of the year so far. Its greatest attraction was the representation of the cycle of Niebelungen. Picture 1 represented Rheingold. ...

    German
    II B 1 c 3, II B 1 c 2, II B 3
  • Abendpost -- January 11, 1892
    [German Folk Dance Festival]

    The German-Austrian Verein Uindebona had its annual Hauern Ball (Peasant-dance) at the Union Hall, 70 N. Clark Street, last Saturday night. The occasion was a real peasant festival and started with a parade of German, Austrian and Hungarian groups in colorful costumes through the large Hall to the tunes of homeland melodies. Then followed the real dance, which was well arranged and showed besides the latest modern dances a lot of oldtime rural dancing. The dance-intermissions were filled with jolly song-solos and comical speeches. The orchestra was playing almost continuously and deserves particular praise for its first class music.

    It is impossible to recollect all happy and enjoyable incidents of this festival, which lasted until late in the night.

    The German-Austrian Verein Uindebona had its annual Hauern Ball (Peasant-dance) at the Union Hall, 70 N. Clark Street, last Saturday night. The occasion was a real peasant festival and started ...

    German
    II B 1 c 3, III B 2, II B 1 c 2
  • Abendpost -- February 03, 1910
    Song Circle Vorwaertd (Forward) Last Night's Masquerade Proceeded Splendidly.

    Last night, the Lieder Tafel (Song circle) Forward held its annual masquerade with customary, brilliant success. Animated by the genuine carnival spirit countless masks, part of them gorgeously costumed and Masked groups amused themselves, leaving life's daily vicissitudes behind them. Among the groups, those composed of the ladies and gentlemen of the Rheinischen Vereins (River Rhine Club) and the Zwiebel-Orchester (Onion Orchestra), the latter by members of the song circle Forward, proved most prominent. The grand march, led by Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kellermann, in the role of prince and princess was accompanied by showers of confetti and made a most colorful picture. The entire arrangement produced one of those festivities, which this Club knows so well to prepare, that the participants experienced a most joyful evening which they are not likely to forget.

    Last night, the Lieder Tafel (Song circle) Forward held its annual masquerade with customary, brilliant success. Animated by the genuine carnival spirit countless masks, part of them gorgeously costumed and ...

    German
    II B 1 c 3, II B 1 c 3, II B 1 c 2, II B 1 a, III B 2
  • Abendpost -- January 28, 1916
    The German Emperor's Birthday Three Well-attended Meetings with Professor Kuehnemann as a Speaker

    The fifty-seventh birthday of the Emperor of Germany, his second war birthday, was celebrated at the Germania Club yesterday evening in conformity with traditional custom. The music, songs, and festive decorations were all in accordance with the present solemnity of the occasion: the war abroad, the future of Germanism on this earth. Professor Eugen Kuehnemann said:

    "During periods of peace the people celebrate the Emperor's birthday because it gives them a sense of unity. Now such a festival in Germany would be superfluous; the Emperor has prohibited it because the nation 2there stands united in its lofty, tragic greatness, and before it the individual, even the Emperor himself, becomes submerged and disappears."

    "Here it is different. We assert our pride because we are of German origin, and are willing to make sacrifices in this new land, a compensation for the gifts our native country bestowed upon us."

    The speaker reminded his audience that the present potentate is not merely the sole or personal leader of the Army and State, as during the regime of Frederick the Great, for only the tragic element remains; he shoulders the responsibilities of the leaders, the people, and the future Teutonic history..... A festival in the true sense, that the Emperor would approve of is one where in the thought of Germany's greatness and fortunes would be aroused. . . . . During the short time of the war Germany made history. When one viewed the map, one was well justified in fearing that they could not accomplish it. They were surrounded by enemies and vastly superior forces, yet it was done. It 3shows reality. Germany, the finished product.

    Where is the Russian steam roller, the hoped for revolution in Alsace, the French army in Germany, the English fleet? The schemes of the allied enemies have been frustrated; gone is Russia's dream of World power, with Constantinople at its hub, and gone is England's rule of the waves because Germany will obtain liberty on the oceans.

    GERMANY'S REBIRTH

    Prof. Kuehnemann told how the war actually created a German people. Whereas formerly the absolute non-political nation was in need of great leaders it now has become unified, regardless of caste, aware that its existence is threatened. The single thought of its future pervades all; therefore, that great idea of its enemies , of starving the Germans, simply failed. The complete change in its agricultural and economic status was successful. Germany has shown the world the most magnificent 4example of morals, yet it had to endure atrocious slander. But heroic Germany bore this burden also without becoming embittered.

    The Source of Germany's Strength

    "The love for the native land, the State's consideration of the welfare of its citizens, and other theories were advanced as an explanation for this concerted action, but they do not prove it..... It is the thought that the individuals' personal fortunes are of little value, that one must live for something more serene, a greater future, the inner achievement."

    The German World Power

    Professor Kuehnemann then told how the foundations for an empire of world significance have already been laid, stretching from the Red Sea to the boundaries of East India. This domain cannot be created by subjugation, or 5dissension among the inhabitants; it will be based upon liberty for the befriended nations and will present an opportunity for their unrestricted development.

    Lastly, he declared that the German soldier has shown in this war that he is the carrier of true civilization and culture. He reminded the assembly of the distress in Eastern Prussia and of the readiness of the Western German cities to promptly provide for the restoration of the demolished cities. The German-Americans have always regretted the fact that Germany considered them last, but the war changed this. German-America may now show its brotherly love and assist in the rehabilitation program of the boundary district Ragnit. The German-Americans can become a living symbol for future generations, proving that all Germans are but a single group. To co-operate in such rebuilding and to help create a new German world are deeds that express the sentiments of the Emperor.

    Prof. Kuehnemann's inspired words received enthusiastic acclaim. . . . .

    6

    German patriotic songs were then sung by the Male Chorus of the Germania Club and Ballmann's orchestra played. . . . .

    Ernest J. Kruetgen, president of the club said: "The German-Americans are proud of their past in this land, all are good American citizens, but as descendents of the great German people they have a right to proclaim the importance of their origin.

    "What they send abroad, alleviates sorrow and suffering, shipments from the others contain only death. But the victory of a virtuous nation over narrow-mindedness, conceit, and slavery will come as a triumph for the noblest possessions of humanity, and Germanism in America will share it."

    Festival of the Teutonia

    The German Austro-Hungarian Alliance Teutonia would not miss this occasion 7and also made festive preparations for the Kaiser's birthday celebration. Such an immense crowd gathered at the North Side Turnhall that it was necessary for the police to deny further admission, because of fire regulations. Hundreds of people were turned away. For the opening Ballmann's orchestra played a medley, consisting of German, Austrian, Hungarian, Turkish, and Bulgarian marches. Each melody was received with enthusiasm.

    Mrs. Nanny Oesau recited a poem composed expressly for this evening. . . . . A comedy depicting army life entitled "To Command, Mr. Lieutenant," was presented by the members of the German Stock Company. . . . . A tableau of the Allies expressing deference to the Emperor, proved to be the highlight of the festival. . . . . Dancing then followed.

    The fifty-seventh birthday of the Emperor of Germany, his second war birthday, was celebrated at the Germania Club yesterday evening in conformity with traditional custom. The music, songs, and festive ...

    German
    I G, II B 1 c 1, II B 1 c 2, II B 1 c 3, III B 3 a, II B 1 a, III B 2, III H, I C
  • Sonntagpost -- November 02, 1919
    Hearts of Gold Bavarian Charity Affair a Great Success

    A large crowd dressed in its Sunday best--husky, blue-eyed men, buxom women, charming young girls, and healthy, rosy-cheeked youngsters all with the expectation of a good time, of music, singing, and dancing reflected in their faces-could be seen last night in the North Side Turner Hall, Where the Bavarian Aid Society held a great festival on behalf of suffering women and children in the old country. The promoters of the affair did not appeal in vain the Kind hearts of their compatriots. They came in such large numbers that the two halls could not accommodate them. Even the "socially elite" could not find seats, and before long even the vestibules were crowded. But that did not affect the joviality of those who came late. Nobody lost his festive spirit. Among the guests were also the officials of the German-American Aid Society.

    2

    And the festival itself? Why, it was simply wonderful! The program committee had arranged a splendid entertainment to suit everyone, and they had engaged prominent performers who all did their best. It would take too much space to give a detailed account. As the highlights of the evening, however, we have to mention the "Hour Dance, Aurora," performed by Mrs. Schmidt and her ballet class; the biblical pantomime "Jephta's Daughter," by the same group; the wonderful songs (Lieder) sung by charming Resi Kranz and Resi Sterner, with piano accompaniment by Resi Buchner; the selections of the Liedertafel Freiheit (Liberty Glee Club), and the Singing Society Harmonie; the Bavarian folk dances [Schuhplattler, a kind of tap dance], by the clubs Edelweiss, Alpenrosen, and D'Wildschuetzen; the appealing recitals of the blind violinist, Franz Westengeier, and the selections of the Bavarian orchestra. They all captivated the audience and were rewarded by rousing applause.

    Mr. Joseph Moser, chairman, made the opening address, and Mr. Joseph Kestler gave the speech of the evening. In words that came from his heart and appealed to the hearts of his audience, the speaker explained that the purpose 3of the affair was to alleviate as much as possible the war destitution in the old country. He then compared the past, the time of bloody war, with the present, which has brought disgrace and misery as well as peace for Germany. He drew a picture of the future in which the coming generation would be lacking in physical and spiritual stamina, their strength sapped by the hardships of war and the food shortage. After describing the services rendered their adopted country by the German element, he ended his speech, expressing the hope that peace and unity will be restored in Germany, with friendship and liberty the watchword.

    His words were received with deafening applause; they had fallen on fertile ground, and they opened hundreds of hearts and purses. Generous contributions to the fund for the destitute poured in. Individual gifts which amounted to more than one hundred dollars were contributed. The dancing continued until the early hours of the morning.

    A large crowd dressed in its Sunday best--husky, blue-eyed men, buxom women, charming young girls, and healthy, rosy-cheeked youngsters all with the expectation of a good time, of music, singing, ...

    German
    II B 1 c 3, II B 1 c 1, II B 1 c 2, II B 1 a, II D 10, III H, I G
  • Abendpost -- September 09, 1928
    Foundation Festival of Schiller Lodge a Great Success

    A fine musical program and lovely dance sponsored by the Schiller Lodge found great approbation.

    For weeks, an active Festival Committee made it their object to prepare for the fourth Foundation Festival of the Schiller Lodge, I. O. F. A., which preparation extended into the smallest details, in order to offer all visitors and music lovers a program which should surpass all expectations.

    The Festival began at 8 o'clock in the large room of the Turner Hall, under the leadership of the conductor, Hugo Jung, the Schiller Orchestra, consisting of thirteen musicians, opened the concert with the old, but always new march, "Old Comrades." Several other compositions were played which were all heartily applauded by the audience. The prologue by J.C. Hoch, recited by Miss Fanny Geip, deserves special mention.

    2

    Splendid singing by the Orpheus Men's chorus, interspersed with solos and group dancing, executed by pupils of the Huntinghouse academy for dancing, were on program.

    The festival speech by Mr. Hoch closed the program. He expressed his pleasure and satisfaction about the celebration and the exceptionally large attendance. The festival committee consisted of the president, Erwin A. G. Schnurpfeil, treasurer, Hans Schmidt, and the secretary, Erich Paschky. After the concert, dancing began, which lasted until the early morning hours.

    A fine musical program and lovely dance sponsored by the Schiller Lodge found great approbation. For weeks, an active Festival Committee made it their object to prepare for the fourth ...

    German
    III B 2, II B 1 c 2, II B 1 a
  • Abendpost -- October 28, 1929
    Fall Concert Splendid Offerings of the Tirolean Male Chorus

    The usual Fall concert of the Tirolean Male Chorus was given at the Lincoln Turner Hall yesterday afternoon.

    The Tiroleans stick together, and their neighbors, the Bavarians, and even the Pommeranians give them ample support. They feel quite at home among the musically inclined children of the mountains. The girls and fellows appeared in costumes, as a Tirolean concert cannot be given differently. After all it represents a true picture of the people in their own land, with their songs and dances. With that in mind, this program was colorful and varied. It consisted of men's, women's, and 2mixed choral renditions not to mention some of the songs, which despite of their sentimental strain were lively and jovial. Above all, that typical indigenous humor of the Tiroleans was not missing. The girls, with their typical dresses a-flying, danced rhythmically while the boys applauded and slapped their leather trousers to express their joy, until the noise assumed the proportions of machine-gunnery.

    The instrumental renditions were no less exciting.

    Henry Marchetti's zither selections proved the inherent astounding, expressive qualities of the zither when a master plays it. Ralph Wassner's violin brought roaring acclaim, and Mizi Admont was stunning. Her rendition was an imposing accomplishment. She played so wonderfully that the violin even sounded when the bow had finished its work. Joseph Fallbacker, former ruler of the Bavarian heaven, 3and at present eternally youthful patriarch of Lake Marie, Antioch, and nearby counties, portrayed the native humorous characters.

    Dr. J. Kobalter, president of the Allied Austrian Clubs, gave a short speech.

    The usual Fall concert of the Tirolean Male Chorus was given at the Lincoln Turner Hall yesterday afternoon. The Tiroleans stick together, and their neighbors, the Bavarians, and even the ...

    German
    II B 1 a, II B 1 c 2
  • Abendpost -- August 04, 1931
    The Old Settler's Festival Highly Successful

    I regret the fact deeply that I have never been here before. The opportunity is excellent to meet friends of long ago. Here where the music of German waltzes penetrates the ether, years pass into oblivion. One could hear similar remarks quite frequently from the lips of white haired men and women, who, regardless of time, preserved an astonishing sturdy physique. This was the prevailing spirit among the old settlers at the 57th annual picnic held at Riverview Park.....The Little German Band added to the enjoyment, playing inspiring national and other popular songs, steadily moving from one spot or the other about the grounds.

    According to the announcement made by the arrangement committee of the Chicago Turn Community, under whose auspices the festival was held, the number of old settlers who wished to participate in the contest exceeded the entry of last year.....Proud and happy citizens registered as participants in the contest. One could discern upon their faces great satisfaction 2because of the privilege and distinction which they claimed for themselves.

    With a happy smile on their lips, and a dreamy look in their eyes, these people of yesteryear dwelt reminiscently in the past, while waltzing to the strains of the enchanting music. The dancers moved about with much grace and youthful gestures. Outstanding among these was Major Albert E. Gage, and his partner, dancing a charming minuet. Although the burden of years was heavy, the spirit of youth did not vanish in the persons of Julius Klose, and Marie Braecklin, contestants for the prize....Mr. Charles Schneider, director of the dances, planned a variety of entertainments for which he and the performers were wildly applauded. When the orchestra intoned songs of long ago, as "When the Swallows fly Homeward", "Old Folks at Home", etc., the entire audience joined the orchestra in singing these favored and unforgettable tunes. It was quite evident that among the weaker sex, the more aged predominated among the competitors, and, thus, 3when the first chords of dance music, familiar strains to which they danced many years ago, were introduced, a little old lady came twirling through the hall, holding a handbag tight in her arm, in deep reflection of the days when she was carried away by vigor and youth, now only a memory.

    The first number was a song presentation by Mr. Emil Miersack, who danced a polka, in which he was joined by his friend, Henry Steinborn. Then came a solo dance performed by Major Albert Gage, a talent not discovered heretofore. In this happy atmosphere, hours had passed unnoticed. However, the hands on the clock indicated that time was near when the winners of the contest should be announced.

    The participants and the audience eagerly awaited the result of the competition. Amidst loud acclaim, the first prize was awarded to Marie Braecklin, 6116 North Hermitage Avenue and Julius Klose, 443 Ohio Street, 87 and 496 years old, respectively...Prizes were also received by eight other couples.

    The honorary members on this occasion then took their places in the center of the hall, each couple receiving a huge bouquet of beautiful sword lilies. This was followed by a graceful polonaise, led by Major Alfred Gage, to which the audience responded with loud applause.

    The guests of honor were then escorted to an ideal spot on the picnic grounds, where photographers were ready for action. Reluctantly, they submitted to this part of the program, but seemed reconciled when told that their pictures would appear on the screen in the weekly review, and would be shown throughout the country. Major Albert Gage was urged to dance for the benefit of the photographers, which he and his partner obligingly did.....

    5

    With the distribution of medals, the climax of the evening had been reached.....

    After a short recreation period, the orchestra secured the attention of the audience and the honored members in the hall, and the old settlers took their places in front of the orchestra. Thus the stage was set for the speech, delivered by the president of the festival, Mr. L. O. Greiner. In his short address, the president expressed the gratitude of the Turn Community, under whose auspices the festival took place, and for the interest and excellent response from the public. "Thus," he said, "cobuilders of our metropolis, gathered in a reminiscent mood again.".....

    The following persons were decorated with medals:

    1. The oldest settler of Chicago and Cook County; Major Albert E. Gage, 610 North LaSalle Street. (1845)

    2. The oldest female settler of Chicago and Cook County; Sarah Cornell, 2145 South Millard Avenue. (1848)

    3. The oldest foreign born [Germany excluded] settler of Chicago and Cook County; Jacob Bremmer, 10414 Ewing Avenue, (1851), born in Luxemburg.

    4. The oldest foreign born [Germany excluded] female settler of Chicago and Cook County; Marie Fuertsch, 1527 Howard Street, (1871) born in Austria.

    5. The oldest German born settler of Chicago and Cook County; Gottlieb Klein, 1261 West 102nd Place, (1851) eighty seven years of age.

    7

    6. The oldest German born female settler of Chicago and Cook County; Anna Letto, 1033 Wellington Avenue, (1848), ninety years of age.

    7. Louis Heidbrink, 2040 Fremont Avenue, was presented with the medal as a mark of distinction for his continuous services as teacher and organist of the St. James Lutheran Church, since 1880.

    8. Theodore Reese, 1557 Wells Street, received a medal for his continous residence since 1871, at the above address.

    9. Andrew and Dora Specht, 10805 Hale Avenue, were recipients of a medal as the result of the biggest total of their combined ages will show. Mr. Specht's age is 84, while Mrs. Specht is 81 years old. They have been married 60 years and 11 months.

    10. Julia Schreiber, 6227 Peoria Street, received a medal for her record 8as the breadwinner for the largest family. She has forty-four descendants.

    11. Louis Volkmann, 4111 Addison Avenue, was awarded a prize for being the oldest veteran in the Army service of the United States. He was attached to the 57th Illinois Infantry Company G. He is ninety-one years old. As customary, this prize was given by the Abendpost.....

    The last strains of the orchestra had long since died away, and the crowd dispersed when a singing quartet composed of Messrs. Adolph Gill, William Weinsheimer, Charley Schneider, and August W. Fleck, gave an exhibition of their talents, regardless of their age, totaling 280 years. It was a delight to listen to German and English songs, rendered in a fashion as only artists could.....

    Well deserved tribute was also paid to singing societies, which performed 9under the direction of Joe Kellers. The ovation given to the singers expressed the appreciation for the German song infinitely better than words could ever do. Needless to say, that the festival was enjoyed to the utmost by members of other nationalities too.....Congratulations to the Turn Community for its splendid work which we hope will go on.

    I regret the fact deeply that I have never been here before. The opportunity is excellent to meet friends of long ago. Here where the music of German waltzes penetrates ...

    German
    III B 2, II B 1 c 2, II B 1 a
  • Abendpost -- December 12, 1932
    Tyrolean Concert The Tyrolean Maennerchor and Damenchor Gave Good Performances at Their Fall Concert

    The usual concert of the Tyrolean Maennerchor and Damenchor (Men's and Women's Choruses) took place yesterday at the Lincoln Turner Hall. Although the weather was inclement numerous friends of the organization made their appearance. When the musical performances began the hosts of singers were greeted by an almost full house. Toni Godetz, the director of the Tyroleans succeeded well in administering the legacy of Heinrich Marchetti. Both choruses are well trained and are capable of serving by honest performances. The Tyroleans are a generous people; they give few things for their neighbors also; thus they presented some Swabian and Barvarian songs, too. The two soloists, E. Moldenhauer and G. Denhoefer, drew exclusively from bucolic love idylls for their themes. A little more discretion would have been desirable. Quite pleasing were the recitals on the zither by Toni and Louise Godetz. The artist gave proof once again that the zither, when played by the hand of a master, is a very expressive 2instrument.

    Naturally, humor was given its proper place in the program. This was particularily true of the gay and dramatically moving ensemble scene. "Volksleben aus der alten Heimat' (Folk Life in the Old Home), the last number on the program. The successful performance, in which all active singers of both sexes participated, portrayed a typical Sunday in a a Tyrolean hamlet. First came the church services; these quickly gave way to more worldly matters, such as drinking and singing, yodeling, and tap dancing, flirting and banter. There was also a minor brawl. But at the end all changed into a pleasant mood ending with a typical "schuaplattler" dance [Editor's note: a kind of a Tyrolean folk dance characterized by tapping and slapping].

    At the close of the program which was rewarded by loud applause, as it deserved a delightful supper was served. This was followed by a dance.

    The credit for the success of the entertainment belongs, in first place, to the 3chairman of the festival committee, Herr Rudolf Wuertz. In this he was ably assisted by President Eduard Sturm, Franz Hosp, John Ott, and the director, Toni Godetz.

    The usual concert of the Tyrolean Maennerchor and Damenchor (Men's and Women's Choruses) took place yesterday at the Lincoln Turner Hall. Although the weather was inclement numerous friends of the ...

    German
    II B 1 a, II B 1 c 2
  • Sonntagpost -- October 28, 1934
    Ball of the Club "Heimat" to Be Held Saturday

    Next Saturday the Club "Heimat" will hold its great fall ball in the fest halls of the Germania Clubhouse, Germania Place and Clark Street. All Germans of Chicago are invited.

    The events held by the club are so popular that they always enjoy a large attendance. As is the custom, there will be no set program; every guest will have ample opportunity to enjoy the dancing.

    A great orchestra, under the direction of the celebrated conductor Henry Johnk, has been engaged to play. It will contribute to the proper mood a German atmosphere in pleasant surroundings.

    Tickets at the presale price of seventy-five cents are obtainable at the 2Germania Broadcast, 134 North La Salle Street, and at Anhalt's German bookshop, 1710 Belmont Avenue. Besides, Justin Schwemann, 2803 North Spalding Avenue (Telephone Albany 4298) will receive telephone reservations for tickets. The admission fee at the ticket counter is one dollar. The affair opens at 8:30 P.M.

    Next Saturday the Club "Heimat" will hold its great fall ball in the fest halls of the Germania Clubhouse, Germania Place and Clark Street. All Germans of Chicago are invited. ...

    German
    II B 1 c 2