The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 09, 1872
    [The New Home of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung]

    The new building that the Illinois Staats Zeitung is erecting at the north east corner of Fifth Avenue and Washington Street, is well advanced. The fourth floor will be finished this week; the niches for the statues of Guttenberg and Franklin above the third floor are already built. Alongside these statues the allegorical figures of art and science, trade and industry, Columbia and Germania, will adorn the cornice. Already the tasteful facade, though hardly half finished, arouses general admiration. Messrs. Bauer and Loebnitz are the architects. The lot on which the building stands has a Washington front of 40 ft., on Fifth Avenue of 110 ft. Besides a high basement the house will have six full stories, that is to say, fully 30,000 square feet of floor space, or three quarters of an acre. Part of this space will be rented.

    2

    The building will be almost 100 ft. high. All rooms are to be steam-heated. A lifting machine (elevator) likewise worked by steam, will make intercourse with the upper stories as pleasant as possible.

    The cost of the building is estimated at $100,000. The lot cost $80,000. The Bullock press, that will be put into the basement, cost $21,000. This and other new paraphernalia of the printing press, stereotyping, book-binding, etc., added together will raise the total capital investment to about a quarter of a million dollars.

    The new building that the Illinois Staats Zeitung is erecting at the north east corner of Fifth Avenue and Washington Street, is well advanced. The fourth floor will be finished ...

    German
    II A 2, II B 2 d 1, II A 3 c
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 16, 1876
    Body of a German Found on the Lake Shore.

    The body of a man was found yesterday on the lake shore in the neighborhood of Rogers Park. From a letter found on the body it was identified as that of a German, by the name of John Becker. The letter was from Waukegan and was signed Sarah Dembran. Becker was told in the letter, that due to the opposition of the parents, he should look for another girl friend. Besides the letter a knife was found, the blade of which fitted the wound perfectly.

    Becker was a fresco painter and came as such to Chicago about two years ago. He had taken part in the Franco-German War and was 30 years of age. His last works were the mural paintings in Koody's Church, corner of Chicago Ave. and LaSalle St.

    The body of a man was found yesterday on the lake shore in the neighborhood of Rogers Park. From a letter found on the body it was identified as that ...

    German
    I B 3 b, I B 3 a, II A 3 c
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 01, 1888
    A Work of Art Sculpture

    A work of art which has been ordered by a well known citizen for the grave of a beloved relative is now nearing completion at the sculptural establishment of Mr. Franz Engelmann. It is a statue of St. Elizabeth, larger than life-size. The clay model which has just been finished, shows the Saint as the regent, a splendid figure of aristocratic bearing, holding a loaf of bread in one hand and with the other gathering the folds of her dress which contains a profusion of roses.. The expression of the lovely face and the mild pious eyes is indeed devine, the figure and the enshrouding drapery with its folds, the work of a master. Mr. Engelmann will become well-known as a result of this achievement, which will be executed in white Massachusetts granited by Mr. E. Burkhardt. It is to be mounted on a nine foot substructure, hewn from grey granite. Beyond doubt, it will be the most beautiful and artistic monument that ever graced a grave in Chicago Of course, the artist is not a novice, he is a pupil of the well-known German Sculptor, Prof. Karl Kauer, and of Prof. Volz of Karlsruhe. Mr. Engelmann was awarded the first Student prize, in recognition for his plans and sketches of mausoleum for a family at Mannheim. He came to America 1½ years ago, and modelled the statue "The Emigrant" for a New York building, then the "Goddess of Liberty", a 14 ft. Figure for the Capitol of Texas. He is now located in Chicago.... his studio and workshop are at the S. W. Corner of State and Monroe Streets.

    A work of art which has been ordered by a well known citizen for the grave of a beloved relative is now nearing completion at the sculptural establishment of Mr. ...

    German
    II A 3 c, IV, III H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 01, 1890
    In Regard to the Goethe Monument, Which Was Been Proposed for Lincoln Park.

    It will be remembered that the "Schwaben-Verein intends to dedicate a statue to Goethe, the old master of German literature. It is to be erected in Lincoln Park, opposite his friend and famous compatriot, Schiller. The necessary funds are to be obtained, by appealing to all the Germans of our city and thus far, the Schwaben-Verein has succeeded in raising $1,000.00, from its own resources. Carl Haerting, who is a member of the Schwaben-Verein traveled to his old fatherland last summer. Partially at the instigation of the association members and because of his own initiative he viewed the most known and valuable monuments of the heroic poet, in order to find a suitable model for the Chicago locality. Mr. Haerting came to the definite conclusion, that the statue at the Thiergarten, (Zoological Garden), Berlin, is most preferable. It has always been conceded, that it is the most beautiful and ideal, since it represents the great man in the prime of his life and in a most serene manner. The originator is the famous sculptor Schaper. The result of Mr. Haerting's inquiries, in regard to a reproduction of the magnificent masterpiece for our Chicago district, brought the 2following response from the artist. "Berlin, Oct. 14, 1890. Estimates for a reproduction of the Goethe monument which I orizinally made for Berlin. In regard to the above monument, which I executed in marble; the necessary models thereto were made at the time. They are one half as large the finished product. I customarily work in this manner, as it gives me grater latitude when proceeding with the marble cutting. There are, therefore, no full sized models available, only those of one half the dimensions and a copy of the monument could therefore be made. If the statue is to be reproduced in bronze, them full sized model, patterned after the smaller ones will have to be made, so that a form for the cast can be obtained. In this case, however, a few minor changes will be essential because of the inherent peculiarities of the different material. For my part, I would prefer to make the reproduction in marble, as the entire appearance will be more sympathetic, artistic and effective. It is true though, that the durability of marble, when compared with bronze, is rather short, but a work art made of marble makes an animated intimate impression, direct from the artist to the beholder, whilst in bronze it is cool and abstract.

    If, in the course of time, the marble should show signs of deterioration, then a form made of it and a subsequent cast in bronze, will assure its continued existence.

    3

    This method has been used repeatedly here, whereby monuments from the last century have been preserved, (Ziethen, the old Dessauer, etc. Field Marshal Ziethen from Dessau, army of Fredric the Great.) "However, by exercizing due care in the cutting of the marble cautious selection of material and in a fair climate, marble of second quality will last longer then the one century, but during that period one bus the unristricted effect of the artist's true conception.

    In regard to the size of the monument, the surroundings must be taken in to consideration. Here, in Berlin, the monument is almost entirely surrounded by dense shrubs, so that it appears to standing a closed room. In a more open space, the proportions should be larger. The total height of the Berlin creation is 6.00 meters; that of Goethe, 2.70 meters. In free surroundings, the figure should reach 3.00 meters, and the entire monument 7. meters. I have been informed, that the work should be in readiness for the Chicago World's Columbian Exposition in 1893. This entails considerable difficulty but is not impossible, provided that the labors are promptly started, at the beginning of 1891.

    In regard to the price of the monument, according to my present estimate it would require 130,000 to 150,000 marks: somewhat higher for bronze.

    4

    If it is preferred, however, to produce a suitable companion piece to the Chicago Schiller monument, then the Goethe statue, alone would suffice: cast in bronze, mounted on a simple granite pedestal, similar to the Schiller monument. This would naturally diminish the price to almost one third of the above sum, and the completion of the monument by 1893 would be assured.

    The enclosed photographs give a view of the monument in its entirety, and then separate portrayals of each pedestal groups. Pictures showing the Goethe statue, only, have not been made, but it would be a simple matter to obtain a good, small but accurate copy which could be mailed.

    In the belief, that I have answered all the desired phases of this proposition, I remain Very respectfully, F. Schaper, F. Schaper, Berlin , W. Buchen Strasse 4."

    The photographs which professor Schaper forward, will be placed on exposition at some suitable place to enable those who are interested in the proposition, to obtain a comprehensive idea. The artist has also offered to mail a small picture of his Goethe figure, in which the ornamental and magnificent pedestal groups are excluded. But, since the original object was to obtain in a counterpart for 5our Schiller monument, it is obvious that a bronze reproduction mounted on a simple granite foundation, as described by the artist, will be mostly favored by the committee. This accomplishment gives the Germans an opportunity to display their noble ambitions and deeds before the enlightened Americans. There should be no procrastination so that the "World's Fair" visitors from the fatherland will find the two figures of these foremost aristocratic poets here.

    It will be remembered that the "Schwaben-Verein intends to dedicate a statue to Goethe, the old master of German literature. It is to be erected in Lincoln Park, opposite his ...

    German
    II C, II A 3 c, III B 2, V A 1
  • Abendpost -- April 06, 1892
    The Fire of Chicago

    A new picture, the wonderful, brilliant Cyclorama. "The Fire of Chicago" can be seen in the Panorama Building between Madison and Monroe Street on Michigan Avenue.

    Those who have not been in Chicago during October, 1871, can vistualize the immensity of the Fire Drama, by pondering over this descriptive masterpiece of Paul Wichabim, Duesseldorf (Germany).

    The total cost of the valuable paint tableau is $250,000 and belongs to an art Association. The center point of the picture is the place, where Fort Dearborn used to stand. All around the flaming fury can be seen, devouring and spreading. The Southern part of the city is already in ruins, while a sea of fire is rolling towards the North side.

    As we know, that fire catastrophe destroyed about 20,000 houses and made about 1,000,000 persons homeless.

    A new picture, the wonderful, brilliant Cyclorama. "The Fire of Chicago" can be seen in the Panorama Building between Madison and Monroe Street on Michigan Avenue. Those who have not ...

    German
    II A 3 c, III H
  • Chicago Tribune -- June 19, 1892
    (No headline)

    Mr. Arthur Feudel has received a commission to paint two large panels for the new German Theater. The subjects, are to be the "Meeting of Marie Stuart, and Elizabeth" according to Schiller, and a scene from Shakespear's "Midsummer Night's Dream." A composition for the latter was seen in the artist's studio. It is cleverly composed and in a pleasing schemes of color and shows Titania and Bottom sleeping in the forest surrounded by fairies, following closely the text in the fourth act. Mr. Feudel's artistic ability and experience in decorative painting warrant the assertion that it would be difficult to have chosen an artist more fit to execute the work.

    Mr. Feudel is a native, of Germany, in which country he acquired his art education, but has for some time identified himself with the art interests of Chicago. It is probable that he will have the assistance of Mr. C. F. Van Saltza in the painting of the large canvass.

    Mr. Arthur Feudel has received a commission to paint two large panels for the new German Theater. The subjects, are to be the "Meeting of Marie Stuart, and Elizabeth" according ...

    German
    II A 3 c, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 30, 1892
    Dedication of German Temple of Art.

    The alter of art, which the spirit of Germanity in one city has created after long continued, prodigious attempts, has been dedicated and a home for the Muse is now established in our new Fatherland. It was a long, stubborn fight, continued through years of doubt, failure and homelessness for the German Muse. But philanthropic men were exhilarated by the thought of making a financial sacrifice, since they felt, that the innate spark of enthusiasm for art is still dormant in the German heart. It was their purpose to rekindle this faint glow into a glorious flame and that was 2achieved. From the masses came support for the great work and it was indeed just that the name of that heroic figure "Schiller" should grace the new temple, since his immortal creations endeared him to the hearts of the people..............For the present generation of Germans....we should consider and follow the proverb: "Support it, if you wish to own it."

    THE THEATER.

    The large main entrance, ornamented with the finest grade of marble, connects with a spacious aisle at right angles to it which branches off to the stairways, right and left of the auditorium. This space is brilliantly illuminated by powerful electric lights, which, with the dazzling reflections from the scintillating marble gives the whole a most 3elegant appearance. By lengthening the main entrance hall......draft has been entirely eliminated......The seats on the ground floor are in terrace formation while the balcony and gallery are devoid of supports and pillars, providing an unobstructed view. A master work indeed has been created in this particular instance by the builders, Adler and Sullivan, who conceived this ingenious plan by anchoring the "I" beams on the walls. With all its gilding and color splender, a harmonious unit has been obtained, which is very satisfying to the beholder. The abolishment of the many galleries, angles and odd corners marks a great progress in theater building; it creates larger seating capacity since the gallery extends far outward towards the stage. Simplification has made far greater safety for the public...................The architects have created something unique in the wall decorations. Allegorical sculptured groups in high relief, depicting Greek mythological and historical scenes, form an 4elaborate network of ornamentation, along the upper wall surfaces and in turn are surmounted by colossal arches of a pale green, restful hue which augments the apparent height of the theater.........Two masterworks, a pair of immense oil paintings, nearly cover the entire background of the balcony.. To the right, as seen from our vantage point at the bottom, we note the famous scene of Mary Stuart and Queen Elizabeth, as Schiller depicted it. The artist, Arthur Feudel, selected the moment, just after Mary, Queen of Scot, arose after kneeling before her captress and exclaimed: "I have endured as much as man may.

    Go hence now, docile indifference,

    Implore heaven, oh suffering patience!

    Long nursed hatred -

    Burst thy restraining shackles at last,

    Come forth from thy cavernous depths!"

    5

    In the other picture the artist depicts the scene from Goethe's play, where Marguerita repulses Faust, on the way to church with the terse exclamation: "I'm not a Miss, nor am I beautiful. I am able to go home, unescorted!"

    The painter has shown the entire market place with the multitude and, in one of the groups, the conspicuous physiognomy of Mephisto predominates. He does not appear overly elated about his protege's discouraging experience, and the sinister force contemplates other hellish plans.

    6

    Mr. Feudel is a German with an international reputation. He also painted the frieze in the Metropolitan Hotel in Chicago. The auditorium is 90 ft. long, the plot of ground, 80 ft. wide. There are 1,300 seats, wide and comfortable. Exceptional liberality was shown in the dimensions and it enables egress without inconvenience.

    The stage covers the entire width of the lot, 80 ft....The opening which faces the public is 30 ft. (This appears to be an error, when considering the other proportions, it is probably larger). Thirty-eight feet deep. Top of scenery equal loft 75 ft. Cost of the Theater $250,000 of which $50,000 is listed for the stage and its equipment. Total cost including office building, about $800,000.

    7

    Speech By Hesing:

    "The proverb proclaims: 'Nothing succeeds like success!' We have gathered here to celebrate this realization!"

    Speech By E. G. Hirsch.

    "It was a most fortunate choice that the builders used Schiller's name in this instance. We have obtained as much inspiration from the World's great theaters, as from churches: let the scoffers therefore consider their opinions. Here we have a new realm, where bigotry and low, religious intolerance have no place."

    Music By Hand's Band.

    Location: Main entrance on Randolph Street., between La Salle, Clark Streets.

    The alter of art, which the spirit of Germanity in one city has created after long continued, prodigious attempts, has been dedicated and a home for the Muse is now ...

    German
    II C, II A 3 d 1, II A 3 c, II F, I C, IV, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 02, 1893
    The Work of Art of a German R. W. Bock's Library Group

    One of the German artists of Chicago, Mr. Richard W. Bock, has been honored by the acceptance of his group-design by the new library in Indianapolis. This beautiful work of art, skillfully executed, is now ready to be cast, and stands in the workshop of the sculptor, at 3240 N. Park Ave. The group consists of three figures which represent Science, Art, and Literature. It is distinguished by its symmetry and proportions, by the intelligent expression of the faces, and by the artistically beautiful arrangment of the allegorical figures. The figure in the middle has the form of a young man, about ten feet tall, standing on a stair. The head is well shaped, and the flash of the eyes reveals energy and independence. The uplifted right hand holds a torch and the left hand, a palm-leaf. The garment hangs loosely over the shoulders and is fastened with a belt around the hips. At the feet are a globe, a manuscript, and a laurel-wreath.

    At the right and on the left of the young man, literature and the Arts are allegorically represented as two seated women. The first stretches out her 2right hand, holding a pen over a bust of Longfellow, and the left hand holds a few sheets of paper. The garment is laid in artistic folds over her head, and reaches to her feet, leaving the largest part of the body uncovered. The Arts are symbolized on the left side of Science in a similar manner, though in a different position than literature. The left hand holds a drawing board on the knee, and right hand, holds the stylus ready. In the background of the whole group is an owl with outstretched wings -- The symbol of wisdom.

    Eminent American sculptors, as, for instance, Mr. McMonnies, have termed this group a rare piece of art. It will undoubtedly, elicit the admiration of all lovers of art, when once completed. The artist, Mr. Bock, is not a stranger to our readers. He is the creator of the splendid sculptoral relief, which adorns the arch of the Schiller Building. He also furnished the design of a frieze for the Palace of Electricity, and another design for the Science of Mining Building at the World's Fair.

    One of the German artists of Chicago, Mr. Richard W. Bock, has been honored by the acceptance of his group-design by the new library in Indianapolis. This beautiful work of ...

    German
    II A 3 c, IV, I C, II B 1 c 3
  • Abendpost -- July 22, 1893
    Another Visit to the Art Palace of the Worlds' Fair

    It is odd, that, either by intention or by accident historical and also battle pictures are barely represented - - - - - -

    There is no lack of flowers and fruit pieces, breakfast pictures and fishes, lobsters etc.

    Adolph Hirschl's "Prometheus" impresses us with the extraordinary fineness of the tune. This son of the gods is pictured forged to the rocks, and a mighty eagle eating his liver, is covering a large part of his body. But the noble head with the pain-disfigured face is excellently sketched and painted. Very interesting are the nymphs where the artist overcame all the technical difficulties caused by the water, between the figures, with a admirable skill.

    A small simple looking painting hangs in the German department. The limits of Genre and landscape is blended in this, but what calls attention to its wonderful perspective, is the vigor and vivacity in which it is executed. It is Kallmorgen's "Fruehling Anfang" (Springtime). The barefooted girl, the tender 2lawn, the zigzagging river, the village the tree tops gold-dipped by the spring sun - all this is combined in harmony. But in spite of their artistic Value, pictures like these receive little attention, which does not look very flattering for the visiting public. In general the public is struck by the spaciousness, the vivacious coloring or the represented extraordinary event of a picture but it is also a fact that thousands of the visitors see real art works for the first time in their lives and no not even know how to look at them.

    A painting of William Ritter Which shows the market place in Nuremberg in the 15th century is in the Nuremberg Department at the Industrial Palace, where it covers the rear wall on and certainly is a masterpiece in its genre.

    It is odd, that, either by intention or by accident historical and also battle pictures are barely represented - - - - - - There is no lack of flowers ...

    German
    II B 1 c 3, II A 3 c
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 09, 1893
    The German Floats on Chicago Day

    [Two illustrations, about 5" x 7", appear in this issue. The first shows a group of soldiers and a flag with the inscription Valley Forge to the left. On the right side are a number of Germans of Chicago in their gymnasium uniforms, and a banner with the inscription of "Chicago Turngemeinde." A log house with an American flag appears at an elevation, slightly to the left of the center. Further back and still higher, forming the center, is a pedestal on which the Goddess of Liberty stands with the American coat of arms and flag. Prophetically, and in conformity with modern trends, she looks to the left, pointing the flag that way. A number of American flags, arranged as a fan, are in front and below the log house and pedestal, forming the true center of the design. At a lower level is an eagle with a wing spread of about seven feet, inclining its head and holding in its claws, an equally large, open book with the years 1776 and 1861 on its pages. The scene or ground is a rock-covered mound. The dimensions are not given. Using the figure in the foreground as a gauge 2and assuming this soldier to be five feet eight inches tall, the float would be thirty feet long and about nineteen feet high. This coincides with the available proportions of the Chicago float, which was twelve feet wide and thirty feet long. Both illustrations are linework sketches. There will be twenty-five floats in the parade, including the two German displays. England's float is to be drawn by twelve horses, likewise the panorama of Sweden; the latter having a mythological theme. Ireland will present St. Brendan aboard a fragile boat. According to Hibernian folklore, he is the discoverer of America. The second float will be the spirit of Erin. Poland will have four floats.... France, two..... Almost all nationalities will be represented.

    For the last float a huge dragon has been tentatively selected. The grewsome reptile will be illuminated by 2,000 alternating green and red incandescent lights installed by the Edison Company. Also, the famous fire engine, "Old Economy," of the Chicago Fire will be there, manned by five veteran members of the original volunteer company of nine..... Germans in connection with the above are: N. Dubach, captain; John Stoltz, leader 3of the fire hose crew; R. Stringer, teamster. The article covers about five full pages and is continued through two editions.]

    Float 1. "The Spirit of Music," surrounded by a select female chorus of fifty in costume conducted by Prof. G. Katzenberger. In the foreground there are three young girls; the girl in the center is beating time with a silver baton, the ones on either side of her carry a triangle and a flute. To the rear there are allegorical figures with lyre, reed fife and tambourine. During the parade the chorus will sing S. G. Pratt's hymn, and Liberty," as well as other patriotic airs.

    Float 2. "Chicago I Will!" This float is surrounded by all the States of the Union welcoming the people of the earth. On the four corners are the muses of sculpture, music, science, and literature. "Chicago" is enthroned on an elevated platform mounted upon the globe. The predominating color scheme of this assembly is gold, framed with silver and white. It was built by Mr. A. Steidle, 106 Randolph Street, and is twelve by thirty feet. The float will be drawn by eight horses, supplied by the James Kirk Company.

    4

    Float 7. "Commerce of Chicago,".... Drawn by eighteen horses, three abreast, led by men in mediaeval array.... a contribution of the Chicago Stock Exchange.

    Float 8. "Columbus at the Spanish Court." This portrays the well-known scene in which Isabella decides to pawn her crown jewels to raise the necessary money for the expedition.... This work of Aloys Loeher will be drawn by six black horses loaned by the Seipp Brewery.....

    [Two illustrations, about 5" x 7", appear in this issue. The first shows a group of soldiers and a flag with the inscription Valley Forge to the left. On the ...

    German
    II B 1 c 3, II A 3 b, II A 3 c, II B 1 a, III B 2, II A 2, II B 3, II B 1 c 3, IV