The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 14, 1861
    Thielemann's Company

    Another contingent of cavalry will leave Chicago for the battlefield--a troop just as brave as Schambeck's boys. Although this company, which consists chiefly of experienced cavalrymen, was accepted for service July 2, it must support itself until it has been sworn for service. However, these men have no means of obtaining a living, since they have ceased working. Therefore, the German public, every patriotic citizen of German extraction, is requested to do his share toward the maintenance of these brave men. A "musical evening" has been arranged tonight at North's Theatre for the benefit of Cavalry Company Number Two, of which Captain Thielemann is the leader. We advise that all Germans read the program which appears in the respective advertisement. It offers plenty of entertainment, and the fact that the purpose is a patriotic one should make it doubly enjoyable.

    Another contingent of cavalry will leave Chicago for the battlefield--a troop just as brave as Schambeck's boys. Although this company, which consists chiefly of experienced cavalrymen, was accepted for service ...

    German
    III D, II D 10, I G, I J
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 22, 1861
    Our Naval Power Should Be Increased (Editorial)

    Both Houses of Congress are now about to adopt the bill "for temporary increase of our marine". The bill authorizes the Government to purchase more ships for the purpose of suppressing piracy and enforcing the blockade during the duration of hostilities.

    It is certainly time our naval forces were strengthened; for the ships that we now have are doing shore duty. Although many ships have been recalled from foreign stations, and many that have been rotting away in our shipyards during the regime of Toucey--the half secessionist predecessor of Mr. Ward--have been rendered serviceable, yet we have not sufficient boats either to prevent the escape of Rebel ships from blockaded ports, or to hinder them from entering these ports with cargoes of contraband, to say nothing of capturing Southern pirates. However, it is of utmost importance that the blockaded harbors be "hermetically sealed," not only because of the harm which would 2thus accrue to the Rebels, but also because a blockade is valid, according to international law, only when it is enforced to such an extent that no enemy ship can elude it. And, at present, Southern pirates even risk coming into the vicinity of Long Island, to molest American ships when they enter or leave the Port of New York; at least New York newspapers claim that one afternoon last week a Southern privateer was seen off the heights of Quogue. It has been verified that the corsair "Jefferson Davis" advanced as far as the shoals of Nantucket, on the coast of Connecticut, and within three days took booty valued at $225,000. Our readers no doubt recall the other acts of bravery committed by the crew of this freebooter, and also the feats of the privateer "Sumber". Thus, Rebel ships have captured at least thirty Northern ships.

    Matters have already taken such a turn that no exporter of the North will entrust goods consigned to the West Indies or South America to ships flying the Stars and Stripes, for fear of these few shabby Southern freebooters; consequently our commerce with those countries has virtually closed.

    3

    Europe, too is quite reluctant to ship freight on our merchantmen, fearing that they may be captured by some Rebel ship. Indeed, European distrust of American shipping is so great and wide spread that now many empty freighters from that country come to New York to take on American freight. American shippers would use American ships were it not for the activity of Southern corsairs. At present there are at least one hundred and twenty foreign ships which arrived at New York without cargo and which are being loaded with freight consigned to foreign ports. They fly the flags of England, France, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Austria, Prussia, Hamburg, Bremen, Oldenburg, Sweden, etc.

    Not only is our shipping industry threatened with complete destruction, but our flag is also threatened with dishonor; it would, indeed, be a great dishonor for our flag if the world's greatest commercial nation, whose shipping tonnage far exceeds even that of England, could not protect its flag against the attacks of a few privateers who are armed only with a few rusty cannon.

    4

    If our naval authorities proceed quietly the troublesome activity of Southern freebooters will soon cease; for in New York alone enough boats can be bought in a single day to drive the Rebel ships from the waters and support our blockade fleet adequately, so as to render its activity effective. There are approximately forty large steamers and five hundred American sailing vessels in New York. Some of these boats are well manned, but all are idle, and their owners would gladly lease or sell them to the Government. We hope that the selection is placed in the hands of competent men, so that no swindle or scandal can occur.

    In conclusion we would point out that the experiences of the past few weeks prove that we need many more war ships to protect our ever-growing commercial fleet.

    Both Houses of Congress are now about to adopt the bill "for temporary increase of our marine". The bill authorizes the Government to purchase more ships for the purpose of ...

    German
    I J, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 26, 1861
    The Union The Battle for Freedom and American Citizens of German Descent

    We crossed the ocean and entered the Land of Promise, to live as human beings and free citizens on a free soil. The glorious banner of Stars and Stripes--not embroidered with pictures of wild animals, as are the standards of despots--attracted us mightily, for in it we saw the symbol of freedom and human rights, the shield of the oppressed of all nations, the sign of victory of a Revolution which eradicated the last vestige of monarchy from the New World, and which fanned a spark across the ocean that ignited such a wide-spread conflagration in Europe that the citadel of feudalism was completely ruined.

    When we embarked on these shores, we set our feet upon the soil of a new home, a second fatherland; the last ties were severed, and we became free citizens of a great Republic. Many among us fought a severe fight for a material existence; 2many were bitterly disappointed when their immoderate hopes were not realized, when sanguinary expectations proved to be mere bubbles; but just as one finds a sweet kernel in a bitter shell, so they too found the foundations of liberty after many severe trials, struggles, and hardships; and although the building which was being erected thereon did not afford each one an equally comfortable shelter, and did not measure up to each one's conception of beauty and grandeur, the foundation was very good, since it permitted reconstruction, elevation, and expansion; and everyone who lived in that structure had the right and duty to assist in its erection.

    That enormous building which rests on solid granite is the Union, founded on the sacred principles that "all men are created equal" and are entitled to equal rights. And we are cohabitants of this fine structure; we are citizens of the Union.

    And we are indeed proud that we have just claims to the best name man can bear, and we demand every right to which that name entitles us. However, just 3as we demand our rights, and should not let anyone deprive us of them, so we should also be willing and prepared--and we are--to honestly and conscientiously perform the duties of citizens; just as we demand our inalienable rights, life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, be respected, basing our claims thereto on the sacred Declaration of Independence, so we should be ready at all times--and we are--to offer our money, our property, and even our life in the service of the Union, and to make any sacrifice for the preservation of the Republic; for we are its citizens.

    Only lately, Americans of German descent were reminded of their duty, and we noted with a great deal of satisfaction and pleasure how gladly they responded to the call to arms. We were proud to see them leave their homes, wives, and children to fight against sedition and treason and to stake their lives to save the Constitution and the Union. The many German regiments hailing from all states, the German guards in the slave states, the eagerness and ability displayed by German soldiers in battle, and the victorious stand of the German citizens of Missouri are irrefutable evidence that our fellow citizens of 4German extraction know what they owe this country and are meeting their obligations in a most gratifying manner.

    May they always be loyal and never tire in the performance of their consecrated work; and just as they quickly and eagerly rose in defense of their adopted country, so may they persevere and excel in battle. The greatest treasures of mankind, the existence of the Union and the preservation of a haven of liberty open to all who are oppressed, are at stake. We are convinced that our citizens of German descent will take positions in the front ranks during this holy War, and will show their English brothers how to appreciate and fight for liberty.

    We crossed the ocean and entered the Land of Promise, to live as human beings and free citizens on a free soil. The glorious banner of Stars and Stripes--not embroidered ...

    German
    I G, I J, I E
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 26, 1861
    The American Turnerbund and the War. (Editorial)

    Although the North American Turnerbund is dead, it was never more alive than it is now. As an entity it has just about entered the final stage of decay; yet its component parts have developed strength and energy as never before, and the strength and energy displayed by the individual parts of the Bund are guarantees that later a larger and stronger national society will be established.

    Nobody need grieve about the dissolution of the defunct Turnerbund, for it had outlived its usefulness and was marked for destruction as long as five years ago. At that time a schism in its ranks wrought damage that was not repaired, despite all efforts of S. R. Wiesner, editor of Turnzeitung, the Society's official organ, to instill new life into the national association. 2When the Turnzeitung collapsed as a result of the April riots in Baltimore, the last hour of the North American Turnerbuad had come.

    It had accomplished much good during the time of its existence, before, as well as after the schism; it had introduced as a permanent branch of education--a branch of which Americans physical education were unaware--not only into German-American circles but those of Anglo-Americans as well. Through the scientific lectures of Schuenemann-Pott, Stallo, and Solger, the Bund had engendered and fostered much mental activity among many of our German-American youths; it had established several good elementary and evening schools, or had caused their established; it had worked hand in hand with singing societies to make a place for German male choruses in America. In political battles it had served as the vanguard of the German-American element for some time; for after having taken a firm stand (through the adoption of the "Buffalo" platform in the fall of 1855) for the principles of the Republican party, which had been organized but a few years before, it soon widened this platform, which originally was directed against the further spreading of slavery, by making 3a strong attack on slavery itself (sic); Through the establishment of rifle clubs the Bund had provided military training for some of its members, and thereby, as we shall see, it had laid the foundation for reorganization. [Translator's note: The author is in error if he means to create the impression that this was the first evidence of the anti-slavery attitude of Americans of German descent. Long before the birth of the Republican party, in fact, nearly a hundred years before the American Declaration of Independence was signed in 1688, German Menonites in Germantown, Pennsylvania, under the leadership of their pastor, the Reverend Daniel Pastorius, publicly protested against slavery as an institution.]

    Indeed, the Turnerbund had a long and honorable existence, but owing to indifference among the members its usefulness was impaired, and its services dwindled more and more. It would require too much time and space to trace all the causes of this indifference; we will mention briefly one of the chief causes, namely, the purely material tendencies which became especially noticeable after Turner saloons were opened in many cities. At that time individual 4Turner organizations actually were nothing but saloonkeepers' and beer speculators' associations; in some instances vain and idle formalism supplanted noble endearers and estranged many older members who had rendered valuable services and were the pillars of the organization.

    However, these bad symptoms began to vanish when the great battle against The Southern Rebels was begun....

    The Turner will see to it that history will relate and praise them for many more and much greater deeds. Even now they merit the distinction of having furnished proportionately more men for the army of the Union than any other association in the United States. Though they were snubbed, ridiculed, and neglected, their ardor for combat did not wave; moreover it grew when difficulties increased, and since Siegel and Willich issued their first warnings, Turner fighters have doubled their efforts.

    It is to be deplored that all Turners serving in the various regiments of 5the Union Army cannot be united into one large Turner corps, or perhaps into two; one could be placed under the command of Siegel, and the other under Willich, for they are both Turners. Perhaps it is better that they are distributed among the various corps, and that, for instance, the Turner rifle men of Cincinnati are operating in the mountains of West Virginia, the Turner rifle men of the State of New York are located at Fort Monroe, those of Philadelphia are in the vicinity of Alexandria, and some Turner of Chicago are serving in the southeastern part of Missouri. Their military efficiency and, we may add, their staunchness, zeal, and endeavor, which have been renewed and increased on the field of battle, and their desire to fight a war for the liberation of men from the bonds of slavery rather than a political war, have been a source of strength and inspiration for the various army corps, especially for the Germans troops. And that Turner are able to operate as larger units is evinced by the services of the New York Turner Regiment.

    Just as German Turners of the North, though they are spread over every part 6of the theatre of war, form in spirit one great brotherhood in arms, so they will form one great association, a regenerated and purified Turnerbund. The best and ablest German men will gladly join that Bund; for it will be their task, not only to resume the noble and elevating work of the old Turnerbund, but also to counteract the moral and physical debility which will follow in the wake of this great struggle, to prevent the atrophy of the good results of this war, and above all, to protect the good which Americans of German descent will reap from the victory of the North against the envy and wiles of nativism.

    Although the North American Turnerbund is dead, it was never more alive than it is now. As an entity it has just about entered the final stage of decay; yet ...

    German
    II B 3, III B 2, III D, I J, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 30, 1861
    The Anti-Slavery Meeting in the Hall of the Arbeiterverein

    The election of Mr. Joachim Kersten as president, and Mr. Leonhardt Lamberts as secretary, completed the organization of the meeting. Dr. Schmidt, the first speaker, offered much interesting information concerning the Missouri campaign, with which he is familiar from personal observation. He also spoke on the noble deeds of General Lyon and the shameful treatment which he received at the hands of the Government. Later we shall comment on Dr. Schmidt's revelations concerning Lyons and the Administration.

    Mr. Heinrich Greenbaum was the second speaker. This champion of "Douglas Democracy" proved that constitutional guarantees for slavery are no longer the issue in the present War, and that total abolition of slavery is now the bone of contention. Mr. Greenbaum offered logical reasons for his new political view and, since he dared to renounce the viewpoint 2to which he had heretofore adhered, and proceeded to defend the platform of human rights, he was loudly applauded.

    The third speaker, Mr. Wilhelm Rapp, cited events which occured in the border slave states to prove that slavery is the fundamental cause of the War and that permanent harmony and peace cannot be restored until slavery has been abolished. He protested against President Lincoln's mutilation of Fremont's emancipation proclamation, but said that although this act was extremely objectionable he nevertheless urged everybody to support the Chief Executive in the fight against slavery.

    Mr. Wentworth, the fourth man to address the assembly, made use of his inherent sense of humor and his brilliant gift of satire to defend the Pathfinder and his proclamation. In the course of his address Mr. Wentworth also referred to the bank issue, and of course numerous sharp blows were dealt to wildcat banks. "Long John" declared that he would soon arrange a meeting to discuss the bank situation.

    3

    He was followed on the speakers' platform by Mr. Theodor Hielscher, who severely criticized the Administration for its many military and political blunders.

    The following resolutions were proposed by Mr. Wilhelm Rapp and were unanimously adopted:

    1) Resolved, That we are convinced that the slavery existing in the Southern States of the Union is the cause of the present war, and that peace and the Union cannot be restored unless this infamous institution is completely abolished.

    2) Resolved, That we heartily approve of General Fremont's proclamation of August 30, for we believe slavery will receive the death blow if the provisions of that proclamation are strictly enforced.

    3) Resolved, That we deeply regret and disapprove of President Lincoln's 4mutilation of Fremont's proclamation, since the act of the Chief Executive tends to encourage rebellion and slavery.

    4) Resolved, That we support the administration in its battle against the Rebels as much as we can, but we request that the war be prosecuted with more vigor and less consideration.

    5) Resolved, That we ask our representatives in Congress to enact Fremont's proclamation and to make it applicable to all Rebels.

    Joachim Kersten, President,

    Leonhardt Lamberts, Secretaty.

    The election of Mr. Joachim Kersten as president, and Mr. Leonhardt Lamberts as secretary, completed the organization of the meeting. Dr. Schmidt, the first speaker, offered much interesting information concerning ...

    German
    I H, III B 1, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 01, 1861
    Resolutions of Socialer Arbeiterverein

    In a meeting held September 28, 1861, the Socialer Arbeiterverein of the Tenth Ward passed the following resolution:

    Whereas, It is absolutely necessary that we wage a forceful war and use every means at our disposal if our efforts are to be successful; and

    Whereas, Slavery, the cause of the War now raging in our Republic, must be eradicated, and to that end the Southern Rebels must be conquered; and

    Whereas, The Germans in our free country look upon the procedure described in the proclamation of General John Fremont as the only correct way of suppressing the rebellion, and have been encouraged by that proclamation to continue war operations and to report for military duties in large numbers; and

    Whereas, President Lincoln's mutilation of General Fremont's proclamation has 2discouraged not only many Germans, but also a great number of Americans who came from countries other than Germany, and has retarded the enlistment of volunteers; therefore be it

    Resolved, That we fully indorse the resolutions adopted in public meetings at Coldwater, Michigan; Davenport, Iowa; Cottage Hill, Illinois; Racine, Wisconsin; etc.; be it further

    Resolved, That we consider President Lincoln's act of multilation to be treason against our country; be it further

    Resolved, That we urge all existing societies and organizations, especially those which have a German membership, to inform General Fremont of their attitude and encourage him by continuing to follow his principles, for in no other way can victory be attained, the country saved, and rebellion, treason, and slavery extirpated; and be it further

    Resolved, That these resolutions be published in all local English and German 3language newspapers, and that a copy be sent to President Abraham Lincoln and General John Fremont.

    In a meeting held September 28, 1861, the Socialer Arbeiterverein of the Tenth Ward passed the following resolution: Whereas, It is absolutely necessary that we wage a forceful war and ...

    German
    I G, III B 1, III D
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 09, 1861
    Let Each Citizen Serve His Country (Editorial)

    An English language publication justly complains that in many districts congressmen and senators spend the time when Congress is adjourned attending to their private affairs, and that they fail to show the slightest interest in the cause which is dear to the heart of every patriot.

    It is apparent that this conduct deserves a sharp reprimand. On account of his position, every member of Congress who possesses ability and a sense of patriotism can do much in his district to further the good cause; furthermore the people who elected him have a right to expect that he will be concerned about the interests of the public and the welfare of the nation. Pretty or forceful speeches made in Congress are praiseworthy, and they 2merit the gratitude of the country; but the duties of a representative of the people do not end therewith; he must also seek to successfully use his ability and influence outside the confines of Congress; and it is his special duty to use every means to furnish his constituents with aid. This is especially true during a crisis, at a time when all that our country stands for and everything that we esteem highly, is at stake.

    Recruiting must continue, since the Government needs many more troops, and many more subscriptions must be obtained to make the national loan a success. There is, generally speaking, much work to be done, and the ability of senators and representatives to organize and lead can be very useful; we hope that the people's representatives will not continue to neglect their duties. We refer especially to the Kentucky congressmen, about whom the newspapers of that state complain bitterly. Let them follow the example of their colleagues who have entered the army or organized regiments, and who have promoted the good cause of the Union by word and deed. When a ship is in 3great danger the captain issues the command: "All hands on deck!" This command has been heard also on the good ship "Union," and everyone who does not wish to be looked upon as a coward, or who wishes to avoid being branded a traitor to his country had better do everything in his power to keep the good ship "Union" afloat!

    An English language publication justly complains that in many districts congressmen and senators spend the time when Congress is adjourned attending to their private affairs, and that they fail to ...

    German
    I J, I F 5, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 10, 1861
    A Weighty Voice for the Suppression of Slavery America's Most Prominent Catholic Writer Advocates the Abolition of Slavery (Editorial)

    Who among our people has not heard of Orestes Brownson, the genial editor of "Quarterly Review," the most important organ of the Catholic Church in America? Until a short time ago Mr. Brownson was averse to abolition. However, several months ago, he declared himself in favor of the principle of restricting slavery, and in the latest issue of his journal he advocates the outright abolition of slavery.

    He advances the following reasons for his new stand on the issue:

    "Hitherto I have opposed abolition because of my love for the Constitution; for I believe that more stress should be placed on the preservation of 2peace in America and the whole world, and on the safety of the Union with its Constitution, than on the abolition of slavery in the Southern States. But now I am convinced that slavery must be abolished in order to suppress the rebellion; indeed, we must abolish slavery to defend the Union, our liberty, and our form of government!

    "We have but one alternative," declares Mr. Brownson, "and this is especially true of our laboring class: either we must subdue the rebels, or the rebels will subdue free laborers. Either we must annihilate the Southern Confederacy, or it will force its rule upon the free states and reduce their laborers to serfdom. In that case freedom in non-slave states would be restricted to a privileged class, but our working classes would be deprived of their liberty and would be placed on the same level with the plantation slaves of the South. Then, instead of a Christian Republic founded on human rights as our fathers intended, we would have a heathen government founded on slavery, which is directly opposed to Christianity."

    3

    Mr. Brownson warns against taking this War too lightly. "Who is not for us in this crisis is against us," he says, "and must be treated as an enemy. The very existence of the nation is at stake. Since no means are being spared to destroy it, in accordance with the law of self-preservation we have the right to use any means necessary to preserve it. This War cannot be carried on successfully as long as we treat the Southern Rebels as friends and allow them all advantages, instead of harming them as much as possible. The Rebels are using all their power to subject us; therefore we must employ all our strength and resources to subdue them.

    "The slave population of the South is a natural means of overthrowing the South. The three million slaves of the South are a component part of the people of the United States; they owe our Government loyalty, but they are also entitled to the protection of the Federal Government.

    "The Government of the United States has the right not only to arm the whites in west Virginia and East Tennessee, but also to make friends and allies of 4the slaves, to equip them with guns and swords, and to put them in the armed forces of the country. It is of no consequence that these people have heretofore been slaves in the respective states according to law and custom; for the laws and customs of these states have been invalidated through the act of rebellion. All laws for the defense of the life and property of the Rebels have been repealed by the rebellion; the rebellion has deprived the Rebels of the right to live and to possess property. If that were not a fact, the Government of the United States would have no right to suppress the rebellion by force of arms, or to confiscate the property of the Rebels.

    "If the slaves are not considered as property, they are citizens of the United States, they owe the Federal Government loyalty, they are duty-bound to serve the Government, and, like all other loyal citizens, they are entitled to the protection of the United States.

    "If the United States was ever constrained to regard the Negroes of the 5South as slaves, that obligation was terminated by the rebellion and the Government must now accord the Negroes the rights and consideration due all free men, thereby removing the cause for the rebellion, slavery.

    "And if the slaves of the Rebel states are to be looked upon as chattel, the Government has the right to confiscate them just as it may confiscate the rice, cotton, or other property of the Rebels. This right is based on the Confiscation Act which was adopted by Congress August 4.

    "The argument that the suppression of slavery would estrange West Virginia And East Tennessee from the Union, and make enemies of Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri is anything but tenable; for it was just this eternal consideration for the South that misled the Government into following the detrimental policy of taking half measures. Fear is the most ignorant counselor, and a government which is reluctant to follow the best policy, fearing that friends who object to the procedure might be estranged, is lost. The boundary between friend and enemy must be well defined. In a crisis 6like the present one, lukewarm friends and they who are our friends only when we make concessions in behalf of their interests or give way to their prejudices, are worse than open enemies. Shall the Northern States sacrifice their lives and property merely to satisfy the pretensions of the slaveholders in Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri? That would be unjust and unreasonable. The slaveholders of Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri are as deeply obligated to sacrifice their slave property for the welfare of the Union as the Northern States are to sacrifice themselves and their possessions to quell the Rebels. Besides, loyal slaveholders could be reimbursed for any losses which they might suffer through granting their slaves freedom."

    As we note from Tuesday's issue of the New York Herald, which was delivered to us last evening, Archbishop Hughes felt duty-bound to offer a strong protest against this masterful article of Mr. Brownson. We shall comment on this protest tomorrow.

    Who among our people has not heard of Orestes Brownson, the genial editor of "Quarterly Review," the most important organ of the Catholic Church in America? Until a short time ...

    German
    I J, II B 2 d 2, III C, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 22, 1861
    In Behalf of Hecker's Regiment

    The Chicago Turngemeinde gave an entertainment last Saturday at 8 P. M., in Kinzie Hall, for the benefit of the Ladies Aid Society of Chicago. The latter organization wishes to furnish Hecker's Regiment with bandages and other indispensible articles. The entertainment was not only a social success, but its results also showed the popularity of the performances of the Chicago Turngemeinde, and the extent of our German population's love and esteem for the Regiment which is led by brave Hecker, the idol of German Republican youths.

    According to the published report, the receipts for admission were $42.50, and the receipts at the bar, $74.50. Total disbursements were $63.55. The German newspapers advertised the entertainment free of charge.

    We would like to announce that ladies who wish to employ their dainty hands in promoting the health and comfort of our brave German soldiers may 2obtain materials from Mrs. Caspar Butz, 127 La Salle Street, or from Mrs. Georg Schneider, 110 North Clark Street.

    The Chicago Turngemeinde gave an entertainment last Saturday at 8 P. M., in Kinzie Hall, for the benefit of the Ladies Aid Society of Chicago. The latter organization wishes to ...

    German
    II D 10, III B 2, III D, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 05, 1861
    The Resolutions of the Union Meeting (Editorial)

    Even though the union meeting held at Bryan's Hall has been productive of no good whatever, every freedom-loving German is honor-bound to subscribe to the resolutions which were passed. These resolutions contain the principles that General John Fremont laid down in his proclamation. They have caused proslavery people much pain, and the Democratic committee has publicly denounced them and declared that no Democrat is obligated to support candidates who do not openly disavow these resolutions.

    These pro-slavers are led by W. C. Goudy, a candidate for the constitutional convention, and he did everything he possibly could to prevent the adoption of these resolutions. What liberal-minded German will vote for a pro-slavery man while our soldiers are shedding their blood and dying on the battlefields to overthrow the accursed slave barons? Not one.

    2

    Therefore, we call upon all citizens of German descent to vote for Johann Heinrich Muehlke and Elliott Anthony:

    Even though the union meeting held at Bryan's Hall has been productive of no good whatever, every freedom-loving German is honor-bound to subscribe to the resolutions which were passed. These ...

    German
    I J, III D, I F 1, I F 3, I G