The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 18, 1876
    That Looks Bad!

    Are the local Republican Germans so few in number or so poor, that in order to listen to an outside German speaker, they have first to reach an agreement with the Anglo-American Central Committee concerning money matters? The funds needed by a party should be provided by the free contributions of its members. If the German Republicans do not want to be considered as mere auxiliary troops in the pay of the American Republicans, they must learn to open their own purses. Two years ago, Hecker received for his speech against the Republicans $300. Since then, prices have gone down. Thus, if a speech can be secured for a few hundred dollars, the German Republicans, having Mr. George Schneider as their leader, should be able to arrange matters without having to run to the American committee to beg for financial assistance.

    Are the local Republican Germans so few in number or so poor, that in order to listen to an outside German speaker, they have first to reach an agreement with ...

    German
    I F 2, III A, I C, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 26, 1877
    The City Election

    The fact that Tilden received a majority of 2000 votes, does not make Chicago by far a Democratic city....

    Heinrich Heine said once in his written confessions: In the company of Hegelians I have herded swine , but became terribly tired of them. In the same sense the Chicago German Republicans express themselves! "With the Irish Democrats we herded swine and-have enough of it". When in the year 1873 the Sunday fanatics stormed against the habits and lifelong customs enjoyed by Chicago's German and American population, living in peace and harmony, the Germans became obsessed with the idea of a union with the Irish Democrats as a means of defense. The act of Carl Schurz was still fresh in their memory, when in 1872 he and his liberals tried to bring about reform by uniting with the Democratic party. This example the Germans were bound to imitate. But the results of that union with the exception of attaining the main purpose: The abolishment of the Sunday restrictions of liberty--were not as blissful as to give thought to prolong or renew this tie....

    The fact that Tilden received a majority of 2000 votes, does not make Chicago by far a Democratic city.... Heinrich Heine said once in his written confessions: In the company ...

    German
    I F 1, I F 2, I B 2, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 28, 1877
    Members of the Labor Party of the Second Ward.

    Members of the Labor Party of the Second Ward held a well attended meeting last night which was opened by its President, Mr. John Gelder. The report of the last meeting was read and accepted, after which the Club's Secretary, Mr. J. W. Bailey, read the Constitution of the Club, which was also unanimously accepted...Mr. A. W. Herr, in his short speech, cautioned the meeting to abandon the old parties and show the nation that through freedom of voting, labor is determined also to take its part in politics. The President then introduced Philipp von Patten, who expressed his bitterness as to the present system of factory work. He said;

    "It seems that the machinery which was invented, does the contrary from what was expected, to ease the worker's life. Not machinery, but general education is the urgent need of labor. The worst enemy of labor is unemployment, which is created by the use of machinery. I am called a Communist, and yet I have 2never refused to make an honest living by honest work....The eight hour working day plays a vital part in the question of unemployment ....People have to realize that in a Republic like ours, opportunity is given to everyone, through freedom of voting, to express his opinion and show his power...He warned against strikes which only make matters worse, but advocated peaceful deliberation by organizations which would adopt political action; that is, those who would make an attempt to elect representatives to our city administration as well as to the legislature, and who are members of the Labor Party.

    Mr. Cowdery spoke strongly in opposition to machinery. The abolition of it is the only salvation; thus labor would again be insured the earning of a livelihood. Mr. Schilling did not agree with that speaker's ideas. He said, machinery is of great benefit to the laborer and should stay here, but salvation can be found only through a shorter working day. He advocated organizing the Labor Party and introducing the eight hour work day.

    Members of the Labor Party of the Second Ward held a well attended meeting last night which was opened by its President, Mr. John Gelder. The report of the last ...

    German
    I E, I H, I F 2, I F 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 08, 1877
    The German-American Republican Club of the Eighteenth Ward.

    A number of Chicago's taxapyers met with the purpose of establishing a German-American Republican Club. Mr. Lorenz Brentano, the appointed president of the meeting, gave a short illustration of the German-American relationship to the Republican party. The tie which bound the Germans to the Republican party since its existence, has during the last few years steadily grown weaker. This was especially noticed at the last election when his fellow-countrymen deserted in big numbers the Republican Party. But he believes that the excellent success of the reformed Republican Federal Government and of President Hayes will have power enough to bring back the Germans who turned their back on the Republican Party, and help her with the reforms which they desire so much; first of all the election of honest officials. A committee then proposed to nominate Mr. Lorenz Brentano as President, Mr. C. M. Staiger and Mr. C. M. Petrie as first and second secretaries respectively, and Mr. H. 2Rheinhardt as Treasurer. This proposal was accepted.

    Mr. A. C. Hesing complied with the general request to address the meeting. He said: he did not come here with the intention of making a speech, but came to join a movement which he holds to be of great importance, although he would have preferred to remain in quiet activity.... It is a well known fact that since the year 1873 he hardly could have been looked upon as a Republican or at all interested in the party. Puritanism has swept through the Republican Party, threatening German rights. Thus they had to show their power. With what result, is well known. It was not easy to take a stand against a party with which he was associated since its establishment, and for whose development he had done so much. He had to do it to protect the personal freedom of his countrymen and does not regret it. He is not ashamed to acknowledge that he took a big part in the creation of the "People's Party", which came to such an infamous end. The "reform movement" of the 3year 1869 against which he fought, gave Chicago the most corrupt city administration which it ever had. Colvin, whom he supported, plunged the city into debts, but the Republicans were coming to its rescue and he is happy to say that the Germans have again gathered under the Republican banner, adding to the glory of the party in its reform work. The fact that the Germans deserted the Republican Party some time ago was a good lesson. They learned that reform was imperative and this was shown in the attitude of President Hayes who displayed manliness and courage in freeing the American people once again. As in the case of the Federal Government, so will local conditions be helped by the reforms, which the Republican Party is trying to introduce. There are parties which hope for success, for instance, the Labor Party, but this newly organized party can not last. The Republican Party which solved the slave question, although the process was slow, will find a way to solve the social question also... He has come to the conclusion that a strong party organization is the utmost importance, therefore he will devote 4the rest of his life to the service of the party and thereby serve the people of this country....

    Mr. Lorenz Brentano then spoke of the importance of the coming election. The citizens are almost more interested in local than in state and national elections, although their negligence is sometimes inexcusable. Much thought should be given to the election of county officials for they have the power over the citizens' money. The election of judges should not be taken lightly either; they can display a strong influence upon the welfare of society. It is hardly necessary to mention the importance of the County Clerk's office which has gone from bad hands into worse, revoltingly loathsome at the present. The profit of former years has changed into deficit now. At this point Mr. Hesing made known that the cost of the clerk's office exceeded $100,000 last year and according to information he had received, this sum will be exceeded by $10,000 this year. Mr. Brentano then asked the Germans to have faith in the Republican party to aid her in introducing reforms and in the election of 5honest officials. If the Germans do their part at the coming election, they will earn the gratitude of the people.

    A number of Chicago's taxapyers met with the purpose of establishing a German-American Republican Club. Mr. Lorenz Brentano, the appointed president of the meeting, gave a short illustration of the ...

    German
    I F 2, I F 1, I F 3, I F 6, I B 1, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 22, 1877
    Political Meetings

    The German-American Republican Club of the Eighteenth Ward held a meeting last night at which Mr. Lorenz Brentano acted as President. He made it known to the meeting that the advertisement in connection with the last meeting was donated by the Illinois-Staats-Zeitung, but that a small charge was made by the Freie Presse. Today's meeting was announced by both of these papers free of charge. Because the Freie Presse called the meeting as - "The meeting of the Hesing jail-guard", - this resolution was proposed and decided upon, considering that the Freie Presse in its issue of the 16th of this month announced the present meeting as the "Hesing Jail guard meeting", the members of the German-American Republican Club of the Eighteenth Ward, repel this infamous insult upon the members of this Society, all of whom are respectable German citizens and businessmen, and furthermore; that a newspaper pretending to be the organ of the Republican Party publishes insults against the party, is unworthy of the confidence and support of the party. This is to be made known to all Republican organizations of the city through our corresponding secretary. The resolution was accepted without any debate.

    2

    Mr. Hesing who was urged to give a speech, advocated joining the Republican Party, and warned against the so-called Independent reform organizations... The Republican Party is in a far better position, according to history, to solve the burning questions satisfactorily; especially is this true of the labor question. The rights which the worker enjoys today he owes to our party. The homestead law and the law against attachment of worker's tools, and other protecting labor laws were the work of the Republicans....Harmonious work between the Germans and Republican Americans would make honesty the victor.

    Mr. William Floto the next speaker, urged also the cooperation with the English-speaking Republicans. These two nationalities in accord, could guard against a revival of the temperance and Sunday fanaticism....

    The German-American Republican Club of the Eighteenth Ward held a meeting last night at which Mr. Lorenz Brentano acted as President. He made it known to the meeting that the ...

    German
    I F 2, II B 2 d 1, I F 1, I F 3, I F 5, I J
  • Der Westen -- March 23, 1879
    The Socialist Festival Tremendous Assembly

    Last evening a crowd, the like of which Chicago probably never saw before, attended the festival of the Socialist Publishing Company in the Exposition Building. Long before eight o'clock (the opening hour) all streetcars leading to the central part of the city were overcrowded, and Monroe Street, as well as Adams Street, was choked with a surging multitude. Obviously, the planners of the festival have much to learn. Although ten thousand tickets were sold by noon, providing admission to that many men and as many ladies as each ticket holder cared to bring along--bringing the total attendance to about thirty thousand--the committee in charge provided only one entrance. Consequently, there was great congestion; moreover, many people who had no tickets--yet wanted to buy them--were carried along into the hall by the crowd without paying anything, the ushers being powerless to interfere.

    2

    Those in charge of the festival should be glad that no calamity came about; truly, ample opportunities presented themselves. How the many infants, some as young as six weeks, managed to survive this swarm of humanity and the dense tobacco smoke in the hall, is beyond our comprehension.

    From the standpoint of mass attendance the festival was a success, but that is all. And, lest our declaration be regarded as prejudiced, let it be recorded that this statement emanated, at least in substance, from Mr. [Paul] Grottkau.

    The mass was overly large, and the north half of the Exposition Building entirely inadequate. The people were pressed together so closely that the Socialist militia (sharpshooters, hunters, and members of the Instruction and Defence Association), about six hundred men, had to content themselves with marching through the hall; sufficient room for performing was simply not available.

    3

    The music appeared to be in the remote distance, even to those stationed but a few feet from the podium. The orchestral strains could not penetrate. A speech would have been out of the question, and Parsons, the speaker of the evening, did not appear.

    However, Dr. Ernst Schmidt, Socialist candidate for mayor, mounted the speakers' platform near the elevator, and would have left without making an address, if Grottkau had not come up to make an announcement. The latter said that, as there was apparently no room for the militia to exercise, that part of the program would be eliminated, and he proposed that the audience should hail the veterans of 1848 and 1871. At this opportune time he introduced Dr. Schmidt, the mayoral candidate. The latter declared, after being received with acclaim, that he greeted the multitude in the name of liberty, equality, and fraternity, and that the great crowd gave him definite proof that the Socialists support, staunchly and faithfully, the principles of their party.

    4

    This, then, constituted the entire official proceedings, which will be continued today, according to Mr. Grottkau. Even after ten o'clock, people sought admittance, but the city architect prohibited any further influx, as the overcrowded galleries sagged several inches.

    About fifty tables, usually used to support steins of beer, served as platforms, and broke under the strain. The racket caused by the splintering wood was the only audible music; it coincided with the militia's entrance, and the sound was not unlike that of rifle fire. At least two thirds of the crowd were Germans, the remainder being Bohemians and Poles. Their conduct was very orderly, though somewhat lifeless. Too many were present; it was difficult even to procure suitable drinks. Probably after midnight, and after the ranks were thinned out, a more animated spirit may have prevailed.

    Last evening a crowd, the like of which Chicago probably never saw before, attended the festival of the Socialist Publishing Company in the Exposition Building. Long before eight o'clock (the ...

    German
    I F 2, I E, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 25, 1879
    The Militia and the "Red Specter" (Editorial)

    If, in arranging the parade at the Exhibition building, the Chicago Socialists had the intention of hastening the adoption of the State militia law, they will find that the bill may pass. At least the local English press spares no effort in trying to convince the block-headed farmer representatives in springfield that the present army of communists represents a "tremendous danger" to Chicago.

    The major points of contention will be the spite and hatred which the agricultural population bears for the metropolis of Chicago, and the fear of an upheaval (and its consequences) which may spread far beyond the confines of the city.

    But adoption of the militia bill, that is, providing an appropriation for it of one fifth of a mill of the State's valuation would not guarantee an adquate, 2well-organized army. Far from it! Of course, there would be no dearth of people desirous of being colonels, majors, and captains; but the lack of men [for the ranks] would be very apparent, Not that we lack young men who are clamoring for a fight, if the opportunity presents itself; but among such a group there are but few who are willing to participate in monotonous, fatiguing exercises--which appear to them to be superfluous--and in submitting to a rigorous discipline. Without the latter, soldiering is but a childish diversion; those who regard military service in that manner would not be very reliable in times of serious conflict.

    The great majority of the citizens do not believe that armed Socialists are a potential peril to the populace. It may be a mistake, but that does not change the fact. The average "peaceful inhabitant" or "Stuffed citizen," "bourgeois", as the Socialists allude to him--reasons in this manner: "Whom do the Socialists intend to fight, and what do they expect to gain thereby? What can be attained by force of arms, beyond what they already possess? They [Socialists] can speak, write, and print whatever they like; they are able to nominate and elect candidates 3if they have enough votes; in short, all the liberties and rights their fellow members strive for in Europe are in full force here. Why then should the Socialists start a fight?"

    To all these questions there is but one answer. The Socialists might, like Brennus of Rome, throw their sword into the scales and thus change a minority into a majority. In other words, the attainment of a plurality by peaceful methods, propoganda or agitation might appear too slow and tedious. In such cases, other parties have resorted to bullets as a substitute for sufficient ballots. This is called a revolution.

    Even for that, one must have sufficient reasons, and they are difficult to find at this time. Even a revolutionary army would be inconsequential if it were with-out leaders who know at least a little more than the individual soldiers. The commanders must know what can be achieved under the most auspicious circumstances; they are not likely to risk their men's limbs--nor their own--on the strength of mere prospects. But what can the Socialists of Chicago achieve by fighting? No 4repeal of State laws, to be sure; nor the separation of Chicago from the remainder of the State, so that they could establish here a counterpart to "New Zion." as the tailor Johann Bockold, aided by his hangman Knipperdolling, did with the bishopric of Muenster!

    This much the leaders of the Socialists probably know, that their power outside of Chicago is nil. There is no gainsaying the fact that five hundred well-armed men under proper leadership could take possession of the city hall, destroy the waterworks and gas plants, and exterminate a few dozen persons, as well as resort to incendiarism, and so forth. Assuming that this transpired, then what? Would it hasten the inauguration of the future state by even a single hour? Could the starving workers obtain bread, that is, profitable employment thereby? Would the machinery, etc., be appropriated by the state by such procedures and thus accrue to the community? Might not this cause a sudden cessation of all transportation and stoppage of income, a suspension of Chicago's grain, live stock, and lumber supply; also the closing of factories and killing of trade? And if this stagnation is to be combated by plundering the "rich," the "snobs" and the 5"infamous capitalists," what would be the result?

    Their homes and furniture could not be eaten. As for cash in a drawer, only a few people keep any there, and wealth consisting only of paper has no tangible value. After all, what is a bond or mortgage worth to anyone who acquires it forcibly? No more than a bit of tinder. The same applies to other valuable papers and securities, the value of which depends upon an uninterrupted, successful operation of a business. Of course, the banks could be robbed, but how long would the money last?

    These are questions which not every Socialist is going to ponder over, but their leaders surely consider them. After all, these men are not crazy, hot-headed Frenchmen, but are Germans, and are not as dumb as they appear at times. At least this much is clear to them: 1) Chicago is not Paris; 2) even in Paris, communism lasted only a few weeks, and then succumbed to a terrible bloody reaction.

    We admit the possibility that the Socialists might subjugate the city for a short 6period, but that does not indicate, by any means, that they have such intentions. To assume such a thing, one must regard their leaders as senseless oxen, and we just won't believe that they belong to that species.

    If, in arranging the parade at the Exhibition building, the Chicago Socialists had the intention of hastening the adoption of the State militia law, they will find that the bill ...

    German
    I E, I F 2, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 27, 1879
    Local Politics

    The Republican Club of the Sixteenth Ward held its meeting yesterday at 311 Larrabee Street. Fred. Karstens presided, and a fairly large crowd was present. Prior to the arrival of the speakers, various persons entered into a discussion of the aldermanic question and several protests were registered against Schweisthal because he always sided with the monopolies. The chairman declared such conversation to be out of order. Then Colonel Scribner gave a lengthy speech, highly recommending Schweisthal.....

    General Schaffner then explained why the Republican Club had nominated a Democrat for alderman. He said no capable Republican was willing to accept the nomination and there was no alternative but to nominate Alderman Schweisthal again, since he had proved himself to be an excellent member of the City Council, and never had been influenced by party politics.

    2

    Alderman Schweisthal was present and spoke also. He regretted that his nomination caused dissention. He did not seek the nomination, but accepted upon insistence of the Republicans. Continuing, the gentleman expressed awareness of the fact that the nomination also met with objections in Democratic ranks, because of his [Schweisthal's] refusal to recommend a Democratic worker for the office of street inspector in place of the Republican, Imhoff, who is filling it very satisfactorily at present, and because he [Schweisthal] could not be induced to make campaign contributions to the Democrats last fall. Schweisthal did not make these donations because certain Democratic candidates did not appeal to him. Likewise, said the alderman, Mr. Washington Hesing had also spoken in a derogatory manner about the candidacy because of Schweisthal's strict adherence to policies of reform and economy, which had prompted him [Schweisthal] to give all of the city's printing work to the lowest bidder rather than to the Staats-Zeitung. The alderman said that he hopes to be elected, regardless of the opposition, and promised to prove to the citizens that the welfare of the ward as well as that of the entire city, is his sole interest. Adjournment followed.

    The Republican Club of the Sixteenth Ward held its meeting yesterday at 311 Larrabee Street. Fred. Karstens presided, and a fairly large crowd was present. Prior to the arrival of ...

    German
    I F 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 29, 1879
    The Wirthsverein Wright, Harrison, or Dr. Schmidt Equally Desirable as Mayor of Chicago

    The Wirthsverein (Tavern Keepers' Association) met yesterday afternoon and was finally called to order at 2:45 P. M. by Mr. Feldkamp, the chairman. The minutes of the last session were read.

    Mr. Wassermann objected to the acceptance of the report of the last session, because it is stated therein that he still has $7.47 which has not been paid to the treasurer. For this reason Wassermann asks for another inspection of the books. Mr. Wassermann's motion was approved and the report was accepted as read, with the exception of the aforementioned item.

    Several gentlemen became members of the Association.....

    2

    Mr. Schmidt was requested to turn in his collections but he declared that he lost the book and was not able to obtain a single cent.

    Mr. Wassermann said the proper business procedure would be to submit the matter to the committee on legal affairs for an investigation and made a motion accordingly. Adolph Mueller dissented. Mr. Wassermann's motion was almost unanimously accepted.

    The committee on legal affairs was then asked to give its report and the following statement was made: The bill for abolition of pool licenses was presented to the City Council by Alderman Jonas and referred to the committee on licenses; Mr. [Harry] Rubens [the association's attorney] drafted the bills about pool playing involving minors, two different measures, and brought them to the attention of the City Council's legal board.

    3

    Peter Mueller favored energetic proceedings against the pool license ordinance and moved that the tavern keepers not pay license fees until further action has been taken.

    Mr. Baum moved that such a resolution be published in the German and English language papers. A. Mueller was opposed to it. Peter Mueller's motion was accepted.

    Mr. Feldkamp then addressed the assembly. He said that it was regrettable that the Association's attorney spoke against the nomination of Judge Kaufmann as justice of the peace.

    P. Mueller: "Judge Kaufmann always proved a supporter of our interests and therefore it appears incredible that Mr. Rubens should have expressed himself so thoughtlessly and in a manner contrary to the intentions of the 4Association!"

    Mr. Langenhagen moved that the committee on legal matters be instructed to look into the affair. The motion was accepted and the president requested the committee to take prompt action.

    The Report of the Election Committee

    The first session of the committee was held at 247 West Randolph Street. A delegation of three gentlemen, Messrs. B. Baum, L. Schwuchow, and John Feldkamp, was nominated to interview the three mayoral candidates and ask the following questions:

    1) If you are elected mayor of Chicago, would you revoke a saloonkeeper's license, if the latter is accused of having transgressed the law in regard 5to the sale of intoxicants to minors and it is disclosed subsequently that such a defendant has not intentionally disregarded the legal provisions?

    2) Would you allow the Sunday ordinance to pass?

    3) Would you favor the twelve o'clock closing provision?

    Besides, it was decided to nominate three committees to interview all the aldermen.

    Messrs. Baum and Joe Miehle were selected for the First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth wards.

    Messrs. Feldkamp and Schwuchow will see the aldermen of the Seventh, Eighth, 6Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, and Twelfth wards.

    For the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, Sixteenth, Seventeenth, and Eighteenth wards Messrs. A. Mueller and A. Engelhardt were chosen.

    The report further stated that the respective committees had performed their labors properly, obtained statements from Wright and Harrison, as well as the various aldermanic candidates, and the Association may now decide whether a complete report of the various candidates' answers is now in order. The question was asked why the committee did not seek to ascertain the views of Dr. Ernst Schmidt, the Socialist candidate for mayor. The committee replied that it considered such an interview superfluous, as Dr. Schmidt, is "all right" in so far as the aforesaid problems and human values are concerned.

    The next step was to decide whom the Association should recommend as 7mayoral candidate.

    Peter Mueller declared himself in favor of Dr. E. Schmidt, even before it was decided whether the replies of the various candidates should be given to the assembly.

    Mr. Bruder, the secretary, declared previously, however, that a complete report of the interviews should not be expected, because the meetings proved to be very voluble affairs and he was not able to record all that was said, but Harrison gave ample answers, and while Wright gave candid, satisfying replies, he refused to commit himself in writing.

    Mr. Wassermann's motion, supported by Schwuchow, advocated that the report of the mayoral candidates should be accepted without being read, and that every member should vote according to his own discretion. Mr. Cortes 8objected; he wanted to know what the candidates had to say.

    Mr. Wassermann's motion was voted on and was accepted by a large majority, chiefly because it justified the assertion that it would be an endless affair if the various members were to give their personal views about each candidate.

    The chairman, however, did not refrain from expressing his regrets, as it appeared to him that the Association does not care to have a lucid under-standing in such an important matter.

    A rather lively scene ensued when Mr. Schwuchow raised a point of order and told the president that no debate can be tolerated after a motion is accepted, and that the Association, not the chairman, decides the issues.

    9

    Mr. Engelhardt moved that the report about the aldermen [aldermanic opinions] should also be accepted without discussion.

    Mr. Wassermann objected strenuously and declared that everything possible should be done to eliminate all aldermanic candidates who are inimical to the interests of the Wirthsverein. It is the duty of the Association to preserve its interests, he said, and therefore he offered an amendment to the motion, that "we shall declare our opposition unequivocally" to all candidates who are shown by the committee's report to be unsatisfactory.

    Dixon's candidacy--for alderman of the First Ward-met with serious opposition, and P. Mueller's suggestion to put the name on the black list was approved.

    Mr. Baum spoke against Ballard, candidate in the Second Ward, and the name 10was stricken.

    No objections were raised against the aldermanic candidates in the Third and Fourth wards.

    In the Fifth and Sixth wards all candidates seem satisfactory, while Gardner is objected to by the Wirthsverein. (Mr. Gardner withdrew, and Mr. Schmelz was nominated instead.)

    The Eighth and Ninth wards gave no cause for disapproval.

    The Temperance advocate, Lorenz of the Tenth Ward, is not to be given aid.

    The candidates in the Eleventh and Twelfth wards deserve the support of the Association.

    Thompson of the Thirteenth Ward was relegated to the black list, while the 11candidates of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth wards met with the approval of the Wirthsverein.

    Schweisthal of the Sixteenth Ward and Barrett of the Seventeenth Ward must be fought. The Eighteenth Ward nominated good candidates.

    Mr. Wassermann moved that the saloonkeepers hold a meeting, prior to the election, in all wards having undesirable candidates, to determine ways and means of combating them.

    Mr. Philipp Maas suggested that an appeal incorporating the aforesaid idea be published in the newspapers.

    A. Mueller in a fervent speech elaborated on the scheme and advocated the printing of posters, circulars and so forth; that the money earmarked for 12election purposes should be used to defray the expense.

    Mr. Wassermann's motion did not pass.

    A. Mueller's motion to publicize in the Tribune, Times, and the German papers the names of all candidates on the black list, was accepted.

    A. Mueller made a motion, which was accepted, that a publicity committee of seven members be appointed. The old election committee was chosen for the purpose.

    Another motion specified that the money ($200) still in the possession of Mr. Baum, be transferred to the publicity committee. A prolonged argument ensued, but finally the measure was adopted.

    13

    The newspaper question became an issue once more and it was definitely decided that the committee was to proceed according to its own discretion, and write the announcements, including the black list.

    Peter Mueller made a short address favoring the Socialist candidate for corporation counsel, Harry Rubens, and declared that the gentleman deserved the support of the Association.

    After it had considered several other matters, of minor importance, the meeting was adjourned.

    The Wirthsverein (Tavern Keepers' Association) met yesterday afternoon and was finally called to order at 2:45 P. M. by Mr. Feldkamp, the chairman. The minutes of the last session were ...

    German
    II A 2, I F 2, IV
  • Der Westen -- March 30, 1879
    A. M. Wright and the Tavernkeepers (Submitted)

    We expect the mayoral candidate, Mr. Wright will condescend to answer the following questions: Were you ever a member of the Board of Trade? Were you expelled, and why? Were you ever a consistorial member of a Presbyterian congregation, or president of a temperance club? Or, are you still holding such an office which induces you to oppose all liberal views? Be honest! What would you think of a man, Mr.Wright, who is so unprincipled that he denies his convictions; who, although an ardent temperance advocate, desires to appear before voting time as a broad-minded person in order to satisfy his political ambitions, only later to fetter the populace under the yoke of prohibition?

    Do you believe that a man who advocates temperance will be capable of acting liberally, without violating his oath or even committing perjury?

    2

    Have you insisted that your employees shall disregard a "booze bill" which they owe a German saloonkeeper, after these workers became indebted with your consent? Were not these men threatened with dismissal if they paid the seventy dollars?

    Much depends upon your answers; it will be shown thereby whether you deserve the vote of liberally inclined people and, especially, the tavernkeepers. Mere excuses, such as a statement that your name was used by the prohibitionists without your consent, cannot be regarded as tangible evidence. Indefinite answers, or an entire disregard of these questions, will be regarded by us as an admission that the accusations herein enumerated represent the truth, and we intend to act accordingly.

    The undersigned represent the many tavernkeepers who are disgusted with the temperance humbug:

    T. Mueller, L. Schwuchow, Ch. Bruder.

    We expect the mayoral candidate, Mr. Wright will condescend to answer the following questions: Were you ever a member of the Board of Trade? Were you expelled, and why? Were ...

    German
    I B 2, II A 2, I F 2