The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 16, 1871
    [Dr. Von Holst to Lecture]

    Announcement of forthcoming lectures by Dr. Von Holst. Year before he spoke about American History and found enthusiastic applause.

    After six lectures on "Pictures out of the History of French Depotism," he will go on to Milwaukee where he is to lecture three times.

    Announcement of forthcoming lectures by Dr. Von Holst. Year before he spoke about American History and found enthusiastic applause. After six lectures on "Pictures out of the History of French ...

    German
    IV, II B 2 g, I E
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 26, 1871
    [The Grand Jury and the Uprising]

    The Grand Jury which yesterday ended its activity has not made itself the tool of the malicious venom of the wretched slanderers of the Tribune, Times and Evening Journal, as these had confidently expected. But neither has it had the courage to boldly state of what no doubt all its members must be convinced. It has heard numerous witnesses about the "uprising" of January 15, and cannot have gained any other conviction that the three papers are guilty, if not before the law, at least before the moral consciousness of every honorable man, of a common crime: of the crime of having invented, with a turpitude and shamelessness unexampled even in America, an uprising that severly affected the credit of the city.

    Under these circumstances the Grand Jury would have done its duty only if it had pilloried before public opinion the perpetrators of the infamous calumiations, that described Chicago as the place of a "Prussian uprising" and of "Communistic violence...."

    The Grand Jury which yesterday ended its activity has not made itself the tool of the malicious venom of the wretched slanderers of the Tribune, Times and Evening Journal, as ...

    German
    I E
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 13, 1871
    [The Paris Commune and the Germans]

    Answer to an editorial of the Chicago Republican that demands the Germans should immediately march back to Paris to put down the "Commune" and reestablish peace and order.

    A number of American papers - like the above quoted Republican - describe it as the duty of the Germans, to make order for the French in their own house, but this is only a new example of the impudent disregard of all German interests of which these same papers have given so many proofs since the day of Sedan.

    Heinrich Heine remarks that consistency is the virtue of those stock-fishes who come year in and year out into the same bays and shallows where they are caught. The American journalists are no stock-fishes in this sense. They don't care the least bit if they say today the exact contrary to what they said eight days - not to speak of eight weeks - ago.

    The ears of the Germans in America still ring with the infamous revilings which bastard papers (Schandblatter) like the New York World and the Chicago Times poured out over them, because they could not generate any enthusiasm for the French republic. But the same Times which could not heap enough curses and shame on the Germans, because they dared to fire on the noble, 2magnificent Paris, the "Seat of Civilization," has been proclaiming for about a week with the most naive self-consciousness, that Paris is a hellish swamp of iniquity; regrets that it has not been leveled to the ground and declares that the French are a completely worthless people.

    We Germans are accustomed to believe that when somebody utters such uncompromising opinions about men and things as these American papers, that he really means what he says and means it because he has thought about it. But this supposition does not fit the average calibre of the American newspaper scribblers with their moods and fancies that take the place of thoughts and convictions and their real knowledge of things European is not more profound than the sediment in their inkwells. So they can hardly be expected to understand the holy ire that they arouse in the Germans with their insulting prattle. What they write does not come out of either their heads or hearts and so they cannot comprehend that it can touch somebody else so deeply.

    Answer to an editorial of the Chicago Republican that demands the Germans should immediately march back to Paris to put down the "Commune" and reestablish peace and order. A number ...

    German
    III H, I G, I E
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 21, 1871
    [The Socialist Idea]

    It would not be surprising, on the contrary, quite understandable, if the horrible events in Paris would lead to a general persecution of demagogues in Germany and Italy. Because to the imagination, not only of the ruling class but of all property owners, the Communists today are just such bogies as the virtuous "Burschenschafter" and the less tame Carbonari were once in Germany and Italy. It is to this generation hardly possible any more to think itself back into the state of mind deliberately nursed by the governments among the "decent citizens" half a century, nay, thirty years, ago by systematic misrepresentation of the activity of the "demagogues." Today the most dreaded demagogues and Carbonaris of them, are celebrated statesmen, professors, privy counsellors, famous writers, etc., enthusiastically cheered whenever they appear at some celebration to tell their amazed listeners of the deprivations and persecutions they had to suffer for working in their own way half a century earlier, for what since, in a different way, has become reality.

    How now, if in another fifty years something similar should happen? How, if in the year 1920, the political, or better, the social ideas (for which in 1871, fifty-thousand or more Communists shed their blood) should in purified form come into their own? Today the mere supposition of such a thing being possible appears utterly fantastic - however, hardly more fantastic than 2the prediction would have appeared fifty years ago, that the nephew of Napoleon would ride over France for two decades, and that the then twenty-five years old second son of the King of Prussia would become Europe's most powerful emperor. It is true German unification as the year 1871, brought it, is very different from what the "Burschenschafter" dreamed it; not a romantic, poetic dream of Hohenstaufen, but the sober, realistic rule of the Hohenzollerns. And so the Socialist idea, too, which appeared in Paris in 1871, in its crudest form, reminiscent of Caliban, by 1920, would appear in a far more decent, thoroughly un-democratic shape. But with this qualification, the gradual growing up of the Socialist ideas to a power transforming the prevailing conditions in Europe is not at all impossible. It would not be surprising at all, if at the end of the 19th century the slogan "Equalification of social differences, elimination of the conflict between capital and labor" would have as much power over the minds of men, as at the middle of the century the cry "Popular representation, freedom of press and speech, national unity," had.

    So much is certain, that in the thickly populated nations of Europe, ideas are germinating (as yet in the most formless shape) that finds no expression in the present political organizations, and that these ideas will provide the motive power for the transformations that are to be expected in the next generations. But to distinguish already, now, between the chaff and the wheat; 3between the dross and the metal; that would require a gift of prophecy which we do not claim to possess.

    It would not be surprising, on the contrary, quite understandable, if the horrible events in Paris would lead to a general persecution of demagogues in Germany and Italy. Because to ...

    German
    I E
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 14, 1871
    American Communists

    "Too bad there were not two zeros more at the end," was the first remark which hundreds of newspaper readers made when they read that about forty of the New York Hibernians had been shot dead. Not since the July days of 1863 has the bitterness towards the more brutish classes of the Irish population reached such amazing intensity. "One should exterminate the whole despicable mob," was an expression one could hear innumerable times. And the regret that only so few of the rioters had been brought down was universal.

    Next in order now will be that Wendell Phillips comes forward with a defense of the Irish cut-throats. He must, if he is consistent. Has he not just recently glorified the Paris Communists as martyrs of true liberty? In both cases it was the Celtic idea of freedom for which the battle was fought - that is to say, the idea that freedom consists in killing everybody with whom one disagrees.

    The only difference was that the Communists were well armed and organized, while in New York there was only a savage disordered mob of blood thirsty predatory animals. Not only New York, but the whole country2breathes freer and easier after the bloody chastisement that the Communists of the American Paris have suffered. One hopes to see in this a promise of the impending end of the Irish strelitzes in New York. Is this hope justified? That is very doubtful. The number of wretches who have dominated all elections in New York has been reduced only slightly. In July 1863, twelve-hundred of them were shot to pieces, and no improvement of conditions in New York ensued. Where is there any assurance against the recurrence of such horrors? Shall the experiment of communal self government based on universal franchise be given up as unsuccessful in big cities with tetrogeneous populations? And if not, how can the problem be solved in harmony with right, order, freedom, and civilization?

    "Too bad there were not two zeros more at the end," was the first remark which hundreds of newspaper readers made when they read that about forty of the New ...

    German
    I C, III G, I E
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 14, 1871
    [The Germania and the Concordia Singing Societies Merge]

    Haase's Park, situated so close to the city that it is almost part of it, but on the other hand contrasting to it so pleasantly by its country air and its landscaping-Haase's Park has yesterday for the last time been used for a festivity.

    The occasion was the merger of the Germania and the Concordia Singing Societies who belong to the biggest associations in the West, if not in all of the United States.

    The high point of the program was the "Hymn to Music". The effect was overwhelming; the public was carried away and applauded tempestuously...Mr. Floto, the President of the Male Choir then made a speech, quoting the old verse:

    "Where you hear a song, you may rest your wing,

    Evil people have no songs to sing!"

    (Wo man singt, da lass dichrnhig nieder

    Bose Menschen habenkeine Lieder!)

    and continuing: "Ladies and Gentlemen! Should our American fellow citizens be able to subscribe to these words? I beliebe not.

    2

    I rather fear they will regard it as an act of impiety that we spend our fine Sunday in the open air, singing and laughing and enjoying ourselves instead of going to church. Blinded by habit and custom they cannot comprehend that we, too, are endeavoring to safe guard public morality, without however submitting to church hypocrisy."

    Finally the Male Choir sang a composition by its director, Mr. Schmelz, called the "Rhein Wine Song." It is a composition of the well-known dithyrambic by Herwegh.

    Haase's Park, situated so close to the city that it is almost part of it, but on the other hand contrasting to it so pleasantly by its country air and ...

    German
    II B 1 c 3, II B 1 a, I B 2, I C, I E
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 16, 1871
    [Immigrant Labor]

    The following strange letter was received at our offices: Replying to your article in the Staats Zeitung of today, regarding my reports to the Volkstaat, I should like to ask you next time not to mix in my person, as you will have seen very well that I acted only on the order of the Association. For the rest, the memory of the gentlemen of the Staats Zeitung seem to suffer from extraordinary shortness, for it is hardly five months since it brought daily reports from New York and other big cities that so many had died from hunger. Do the workers contract this fever perhaps from over-eating, or from what? Otherwise, yours truly, H. R. Zimpel.

    So. Mr. H. R. Zimpel is not a myth, but a real person, even though he is angry that we have drawn him out of the shadows, while he would rather have remained hidden behind the chimney screen of the "Social Democratic Association." In any case Mr. Zimpel is unique. Because - revolting as it is - a few persons in the City of New York died of hunger, he warns the workers not to come to America, because in America, every year thousands starve to death! He deserves a medal - and so does the Social Democratic Association, if it read and qpproved this report before hand. If the Association still exists it would oblige us by sending us information regarding its next meeting. "Mochte selbst solcheinen Herren Kennen, Wursde ihn Herrn Mikroksmus nennen." (I would like to press him to my boson, I would call him Mr. Mikrokosm.)

    The following strange letter was received at our offices: Replying to your article in the Staats Zeitung of today, regarding my reports to the Volkstaat, I should like to ask ...

    German
    III G, II B 2 d 1, I D 2 c, I E
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 19, 1871
    [Immigrant Labor]

    We publish below a letter from the Social Democratic Association here and one from the Chicago correspondent of Bebel's Volksstaat, Mr. H. R. Zimpel. The latter quotes in toto the lines that we took exception to; it appears that he has not really maintained that "at present already several thousand workers annually starve in the United States," but only that several thousands would starve if a very strong influx from Europe did take place. But even in this hypothetical form we could not admit the validity of the statement. Immigration is still necessary for the United States, and the immigrants are doing well for themselves. Or isn't it true that even in a city like Chicago the immigrant laborer acquires, after a few years, a house and lot, and with that the essentials of independence? The fact that up to now the various attempts to found a special workers' party have come to nought through lack of interest on the side of the workers, that the various labor papers usually died after a short existence proves that the need for it is not yet being felt among the laborers.

    The invitation of the Association we will follow with pleasure, and will report the discussions to our readers.

    2

    Chicago, August 16, 1871

    Editor of the Staats Zeitung:

    The Socio-Political Workers' Association decided in its last meeting to invite the gentlemen of the Staats Zeitung to its next meeting at the place of Mr. Reiser at Halsted and 12th Street. Also to give for our friend Zimpel the declaration that he acted completely in our sense and worthy of a Social Democrat, and that no real Social Democrat is afraid of a single paper of their (?) present day worm-eaten society, but gladly picks up the glove that is thrown to him in this curious way. In that, indeed, consists the difference between the Social Democracy and present day society, that the Social Democracy is pledged to mutual solidarity, to stand one for all and all for one, and that the latter did not need in the least to hide behind the chimney screen of the Socio-Political Labor Association.

    The Socio-Political Labor Association

    H. Herminghaus, Secretary.

    Post Scriptum:

    I would rather have concluded this matter with you personally but had to abide by the decision of the Association.

    3

    However, one thing I would beg of you; they were then no lies, but facts, that I reported; for you, small matters, but not for us, when workers die of hunger; where now is the liar? Is it the Cincinnatti Volksblatt, the Staats Zeitung, or the Internationals?

    Besides the paragraph in question in the Volksstaat reads verbally as follows: People in Germany still believe fairy tales about America, and many come over in the sure expectation to here find an Eldorado, only to find themselves bitterly disappointed. That only is due to the fact that the present corrupt press never cares about truth, but only writes what is of the greatest advantage of its own interest, and that is here in America the strongest possible influx of labor. Therefore, lies are gladly heaped on lies, because what harm does it do, even if here every year a few thousand workers starve todeath, who might have managed to survive quite nicely over in Europe. Not by any means, do we want to stop our party comrades who want to come over. On the contrary, he who has made up his mind should come and some way or other he will, no doubt, muddle through; and he who has only some luck in finding employment here, is still a bit better off than in Germany.

    Now, gentlemen, my party comrades and I, find in this not a warning, but on 4the contrary, a direct invitation to immigrate into America. Where now is the liar?

    H. R. Zimpel.

    (Footnote of the translator: "It seems that the Staats Zeitung, after cruelly joking about"Mr. Mikrokosm," now shows extraordinary patience with the honest, but awkward Socialist. Actually, Mr. Zimpel had said exactly what the Staats Zeitung quoted him as saying - however, from his next lines it appears clearly that he did not mean what he was saying. The struggle of the new mass parties emerging in the late nineteenth century was one for articulateness as much as for social standing.)

    We publish below a letter from the Social Democratic Association here and one from the Chicago correspondent of Bebel's Volksstaat, Mr. H. R. Zimpel. The latter quotes in toto the ...

    German
    III G, II B 2 d 1, III B 2, III H, I E
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 06, 1871
    [A Singing Festival]

    (Otto Lob, in an article about Singing Festivals, quotes from the "Festival Paper" (Fest Zeitung) of the last Singing Festival in Cincinnati, May 1870).

    "These great national festivals, as the Constitution expressly states, shall serve to raise and ennoble German life in the United States. Only in a second, anyway, do they have musical importance, their main function is that the German nation in them shows itself to the other nationalities as a united, impressive entity, worthy of respect."

    This was their function, we would rather say, because the necessity which years ago forced the Germans to unite against the Americans (as a collective name), no longer exists. The Germans have gained through their intelligence, and, still more, through the political events of last year, a high social position...

    Unfortunately, the Singing Festivals of past years have been little more than mass meetings, where the Singers' Banner played the role of the tavern sign. The 2boastful name of "Singing Festival" became an ironical designation, because most of the participants could not sing...The recitals of the last years have shown clearly enough, that the German choir singing in America stands on a surprisingly low level, and that the Singing Societies are anything but places dedicated to the cult of singing.

    It is a sad duty to have to say this, but we do not stand alone with our viewpoint, the men with the greatest insight in the East and West agree...In the better Societies of almost all the big cities, new talents have been recently sought, directors have been changed, better order has been insisted upon - in short it is instinctively felt that things can't continue as heretofore. The teachers see, that the Societies must be something quite different from what they have been, only singers can become members of a Singing Society (we mean, of course, the choir) then the transformation should be easy enough. May the Federal Board in St. Louis better understand its task and better execute it, than has been the case in past years, so that Germandom may win honor with the next Singing Festival, and not shame!...

    (Otto Lob, in an article about Singing Festivals, quotes from the "Festival Paper" (Fest Zeitung) of the last Singing Festival in Cincinnati, May 1870). "These great national festivals, as the ...

    German
    II B 1 c 3, II B 1 a, III B 2, III A, I E, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 08, 1871
    [Dr. Karl Marx]

    New York, September 7

    Dr. Karl Marx

    The friends of Dr. Karl Marx, leader of the International Association, suspect that he has committed suicide, despairing of the success of his cause. They prophecy that his organization in the case of his death will collapse, because he has been practically alone in holding it together. (False report of death).

    Editorial: Karl Marx

    The death of the most important leader of the International Workers' Brotherhood is reported. Karl Marx died in London in his fifty-third year, it is said, by his own hand. The hopes he had put on the uprising of the commune had been disappointed, and he saw his aim, to lead, as labor dictator, the social transformation of Europe in the Communistic sense, postponed for many years. His whole life had been directed toward revolutionary overthrow. His rare gifts he used with 2unflagging consistency for the undermining of the social structure. His whole being was thoroughly critical, negative and decomposing; a positive program, how the new world which he wished to create out of the debris of the old one, should be constructed, he has never formulated; the general communistic principles cannot be regarded as such.

    Marx was born at Trier 1818. He studied law in Bonn and Berlin, and especially in Berlin dedicated himself to the study of Hegelian Philosophy. In 1841 he settled at Bonn as Privat - Dozent. In 1842 his took over the editorship of the Rheinische Zeitung in Cologne, and had the honor to see the paper suppressed. Marx fled to Paris and with Ruge, he edited the German-French Annuals.

    The revolution of 1848 brought him back to Cologne...1849 he fled again to Paris, later to London. From there he corresponded for a while with the New York Tribune. Of his literary works the critique of Proudhon's "The Philosophy of Misery" (published in French in Brussels) created a sensation in 1848. His 3most important work "Das Kapital, Kritik der Politischen Oekonomic" appeared in Hamburg - that is to say only the first volume and without much success. For the mass of the workers it was both too expensive and too erudite.

    Marx was for the workers of Europe what LaSalle (sic!) has been for those of Germany: the spiritual head, the organizers, the brains of the whole. His place in London will be filled as little as that of LaSalle in Germany. Criticism was his strong suit. He understood like no one else how to find the weak point of his opponent and to reveal the contradictions in his reasoning. He pleased himself in this work almost beyond discretion, and as justified as his censures of the economists frequently were, his critique not rarely bordered on the realm of merely hair-splitting subtleties and sophisms.

    New York, September 7 Dr. Karl Marx The friends of Dr. Karl Marx, leader of the International Association, suspect that he has committed suicide, despairing of the success of his ...

    German
    I E