The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 25, 1866
    Cornerstone of Saint Franziskus Church Is Laid

    Yesterday afternoon, the cornerstone of Saint Franziskus(Francis) Church, which is being erected on the corner of Newberry and Twelfth Streets, was laid. An immense crowd assembled at the scene, and when the time appointed for the ceremony arrived, one could see nothing but people on and about the platform.

    As we have stated in a previous article, the building will be 66 feet wide and 160 feet long, the steeple will be 150 feet high, and the edifice as a whole will be a credit to our city.

    For the convenience of the clergymen, a temporary platform had been built immediately next to the place where the cornerstone was to be laid. At about half-past three, the procession made its appearance. It consisted of several 2Catholic societies carrying their banners and other insignia, and was led by several bands; it took up its position within the foundation of the structure and around the platform. Several Irish-Catholic societies were also represented, and a great many more of their members would have appeared if they had not been misled by statements published in a certain newspaper to believe that their presence was not desired. A large company of school children, boys and girls, the latter wearing white and blue dresses, also marched in the procession under the leadership of their teachers.

    It was four o'clock by the time the societies and the school children had taken their positions about the platform. Then Bishop Luehr, who, as we know, came from Fort Wayne, Indiana, made his appearance; he was attended by two assisting clergymen, and made a lengthy address in the English language. He informed the assembly of the purpose and significance of the act which he was about to perform, by comparing the ceremonies of the church with military ceremonies. He pointed out that just as the flag is considered to be a sacred necessity by the soldiers who gather about it, so do the faithful 3gather about the cross, the symbol of the Redeemer. [Translator's note: This badly constructed sentence is a faithful translation of the original.] The Bishop declared that the erection of a church also required certain ceremonies, especially the laying of the cornerstone. He expressed his satisfaction at seeing such a large attendance and invoked divine blessings upon the rites he was about to perform and upon the edifice and the congregation.

    Then the stone was lifted to a height of about fifteen feet, lowered, and placed in the correct position; and while the congregation sang hymns, the Bishop placed a tin box which contained various documents, newspapers, etc., into the opening provided for that purpose, sprinkled holy water upon the stone, and dropped the cornerstone into place. The Bishop then addressed the assembly in the German language, thus concluding the festivities.

    Yesterday afternoon, the cornerstone of Saint Franziskus(Francis) Church, which is being erected on the corner of Newberry and Twelfth Streets, was laid. An immense crowd assembled at the scene, and ...

    German
    III C, I B 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 03, 1867
    Anent the Sunday Question (Editorial)

    In a recent editorial entitled "Reasonable Opinions" we said that our English- speaking citizens are becoming more enlightened and more liberal in their views on religious matters. The local Post (issue of August 1) is a pertinent example. Christian Times and Witness, a local religious periodical, published a fulminating article, sustaining the statement made by Dr. Schaff and his henchmen in the meeting held at Crosby Opera House, "that a widespread and well organized conspiracy exists for the purpose of desecrating the Sabbath, breaking down public morals, fostering crime and vice, and undermining the very principles which all Americans esteem very highly", denouncing the Germans as the chief tools of this conspiracy, and accusing the liberal press of setting the value of the German vote above that of religion and morality. In answer to this article the Post writes, August 1:

    2

    "It is not difficult to enact a good law and to place it on the statute book, but it is impossible to enforce a law that is not in agreement with the opinions and desires of the majority of the people of a community.

    "Who is to blame if honest German workers prefer spending a part of the Sabbath in a beer garden to visiting the stylish temple of the Reverend 'Creamcheese,' there to endure the suspicious glances of elegantly attired 'Christians,' or attending services in the house of worship presided over by Reverend 'Zealot' where thunderous anathemas are cast upon him from the Old and New Testaments?"

    If modern Christianity has nothing to attract the great class of citizens, the workers, to its houses of worship on Sunday, why should Christians be surprised to find that workers look elsewhere for recuperations from the effects of daily toil?

    To accuse all who do not go to church on Sunday, and who drink beer on the Lord's Day, of "intending to undermine the civil and religious institutions of our 3country," is foolish and unjust.

    It has never occurred to these peace-loving and law-abiding citizens to encroach upon the religious freedom of others, nor do they have the least thought of conspiring against liberty, when they drink beer on Sunday; and though they were in the wrong, they certainly cannot be persuaded to do right by the ridicule and lies which are hurled at them by some so-called ministers.

    We often thank God that time of religious persecutions has passed; but we forget, at the same time, that in some of our churches today there prevails an attitude of intolerance which would condemn to death at the stake a man who commits the awful crime of drinking a glass of beer on Sunday, and would execute all "evil-doers," were it not for the fact that such drastic measures are forbidden by law.

    In a recent editorial entitled "Reasonable Opinions" we said that our English- speaking citizens are becoming more enlightened and more liberal in their views on religious matters. The local Post ...

    German
    I B 2, I B 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 02, 1867
    The Sunday Question (Editorial)

    Liberal statements concerning the Sunday question or similar issues have a twofold value when made by pastors, who, by the way, have great influence in this country. And it is exceedingly gratifying to find that such statements are increasing, both in number and in emphasis. Recently, Reverend Stebbins, one of the most prominent and influential pastors from the Pacific coast district, used as the text of a lecture: "The Son of man is Lord even of the Sabbath." He said in part:

    "The Jewish Sabbath, which according to Old Testament tradition fell on the seventh day of the week, was adopted by the Christian Church and transferred to the first day of the week. However, in taking this action the Christians were actuated neither by command nor recommendation from the Founder of the 2Christian Church. He did not set aside a special day, nor is there any authorization in the New Testament to observe a special day for worship. It was a matter of tradition,' of free choice. To enact a law to enforce the observance of Sunday as a religious holiday savors of a spirit of intolerance and a desire for persecution; and such a procedure is anything but Christlike. And laws which prohibit a citizen's doing as he pleases, though he in no way encroaches upon the rights of others, are null and void. There is still too much pharisaism among individuals as well as among religious denominations; for example; The City of Brotherly Love, the city of fashionable piety and gilt prayer books, enjoins the poor to pay five cents for a streetcar ride (on Sunday)--or, they may hire an equipage for ten dollars--while the rich ride in their won carriages drawn by fine horses. That is a shame! The idea that Sunday is an especially sacred day is erroneous. It is just as much a sin to steal or lie on Monday or Thursday as it is in Sunday, and it is no more a sin, and just as honorable and decent to enjoy fresh air and harmless amusements on Sunday as it is on, Tuesday or Wednesday. Morality cannot be forced by legislation; it can be engendered and fostered only by good example 3and encouragement."

    Well spoken, Reverend Stebbins!

    Liberal statements concerning the Sunday question or similar issues have a twofold value when made by pastors, who, by the way, have great influence in this country. And it is ...

    German
    I B 4, I B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 25, 1871
    [A Corner Stone Laid]

    Laying of the corner stone of the Evangelical St. Stephen's Church, corner of 25th and Wentworth Avenue. The procession was led by Pastor Guntram, the minister and by Mrs. G. Ehrhorn and H. Wolff, the teachers of the community.

    The laying of the corner stone itself(after a long sermon and several songs) was accomplished with the assistance of architect (Baumeister) Gottig, bricklayers Andreas and Fachslanger, Cabinet-makers, H. Erbe, and building foreman,Christian Wiche. Into the tin box in the cornerstone Pastor Guntram inclosed three ears of wheat, a bottle of wine, a new testament, a list of the 68 members of the community, a copy of the April 22nd issue of the Illinois Staats Zeitung, some American coins and the founding charter of the community. Pastor Guntram did the first three strokes with the hammer. He was followed by the trustees of the community: George Scheidig, President; Ch. Mertens, H. Wagner, Wilhelm Luckow.

    Laying of the corner stone of the Evangelical St. Stephen's Church, corner of 25th and Wentworth Avenue. The procession was led by Pastor Guntram, the minister and by Mrs. G. ...

    German
    II B 1 c 3, III C, I B 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 14, 1875
    Church and School (Editorial)

    "If the Illinois Staats-Zeitung can see no practical value for America in our article entitled 'State and Church,' it need only read our today's article about Catholic public schools in Saint Louis. [Translator's note: Verbatim. No doubt, the author uses the word public in the sense of free, meaning to say that no tuition was charged.]

    "Thus the editor of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung can convince himself that it is the firm intention of the Catholic Church to destroy the American system of nonreligious schools, for the purpose of placing the education of our youth in the hands of religious institutions. This movement has made only modest progress to attain that goal in America; but in New Brunswick, which is not far from our country, Bishop Sweeny, of Saint John, has already shown the way to rebellion against the school tax. He even went so far, in his resistence, as to expose the property under his 2jurisdiction to forced sale for nonpayment of taxes. He said: 'Every Catholic citizen is conscience-bound to refuse to contribute to the support of schools in which his religion is attacked or offended.'

    "The offense referred to evidently consists therein, that no religion is taught in the public schools of Saint John."

    Anzeiger Des Westens

    The "firm intention of the Catholic Church"? Well, if it exists, we in Chicago should see it, or hear of it, for Missouri is not America, by any means, nor is a Saint John bishop the Catholic Church. And as far as the American system of nonreligious (public) schools is concerned it could be destroyed only if it really existed.

    It does not exist. The public school has a Protestant tinge; and that, very likely, is true, not only of our local schools, but also of those of Saint Louis.

    3

    When we speak of a Protestant tinge we refer not only to the reading of the Bible, praying, and the singing of religious hymns, but also to the contents of textbooks. Surely, the books used in Saint Louis are no better in this respect than those which serve as textbooks in Chicago. In the latter we find numerous touching references to "Jesus" and the "Lamb of God," references which must be, and are, extremely offensive to the children of Jewish parents. If the Anzeiger Des Westens will kindly examine the textbooks of the public schools of Saint Louis, he will certainly find ample proof for our statement that our public schools are not nonreligious.

    Anglo-Americans are so naive in their religious narrow-mindedness that they do not even notice it when they offend people of a different religious belief. The average Anglo-American says: "I am certainly not prejudiced; I do not wish to disturb anyone in his religious views; but anybody can read the New Testament, and, surely, it can harm no one to hear about our Saviour." However, they never consider that there are people who do not wish to read the New Testament, and to whom Jesus is not "our Saviour"; but there are such people, and they are 4forced to pay taxes to support our public schools. By what right? We do not know whether or not, or how, a certain religion is being attacked in the public schools of New Brunswick; but we do consider it probable, in view of the fact that Anglo-American Protestants are naively impudent, that the adherents to the offended religious denomination have just cause to complain about being forced to contribute to the maintenance of such schools. An atheist, who pays taxes, also has a good reason to remonstrate if the opinion that a person who does not believe in a personal God is dishonest, unmoral, and unreliable, is drummed into the head of his child. No religion should be taught in public schools, nor should the pupils be forced to listen to the damnable lie that a man is depraved and unmoral, just because he does not profess a religion.

    Not until our schools have been made nonreligious in this respect will the state have a right to compel every citizen, irrespective of his religious belief, to contribute to the maintenance of our public schools. Then, and then only, can the state demand that children whose parents do not provide for other means of educating them, be sent to public school. And when our institutions of learning have been rendered completely nonreligious, we will 5gladly support the enforcement of the compulsory school attendance law. However, we certainly are not in favor of forcing the narrow-minded doctrines of the Protestant Church upon Catholics, Jews, or Gentiles.

    "If the Illinois Staats-Zeitung can see no practical value for America in our article entitled 'State and Church,' it need only read our today's article about Catholic public schools in ...

    German
    I A 1 a, I B 4, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 23, 1876
    Colvin against Calvin

    In yesterday's issue of the Chicago Times we read that until a few years ago, Chicago in its observation of the Sabbath was strongly under the spell of Calvinism. It was not Christianity but Calvinism which dominated here. All the wordly entertainments were under the ban of public opinion as well as of the law. All of this underwent a change. Real christianity conquered over the dark spirit of the religious ardour of Calvinism; - the Sabbath is now supposed to be here for man, not man for the Sabbath. Lectures dealing with scientific questions are given on Sundays now, with a much better attendance than that of the churches. There are concerts, theatres, etc.

    It would have been easy for the "Times" to say, that Colvin was the victor over Calvin! - But every child knows that the crumbling of the repulsive Calvinistic Sunday bigotry never could have been accomplished out for the victory of the popular party in the year of 1873. - At that time Colvin was against Calvin. - Had he been defeated, yesterday's article could not have been published by the Times; The detestable, hateful and malicious Sunday 2tyranny would have become "trump". - The election of Colvin by a majority of 11,000 votes was evidence enough for believers of Calvinism, that they cannot succeed against the fresh and happy outlook on life as Luther did, with lamentations, scoldings and ragings from the speakers pulpit as their only consolation.

    This of course the "Times" could not admit, it would not be in accord with their insane and infamous language used in 1873 against the popular party. Newertheless the fact remains, that the welcome change of Sunday worship in Chicago, occurred not with the aid but against the raging opposition of the "Times".

    In yesterday's issue of the Chicago Times we read that until a few years ago, Chicago in its observation of the Sabbath was strongly under the spell of Calvinism. It ...

    German
    I B 2, I B 4, III C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 21, 1877
    The Speech by Mr. Rapp ( at the Opening of the Sharpshootes Park)

    There is hardly any German whose heart action would not speed up somewhat by the mere mention of the word - Pentecost! Out there in the old fatherland this time of the spring gladdens the hearts of old and young. For upholding this lovely custom of Pentecostal festivities even in America, is largely due to our brave Sharpshooters, Turners, Singers, the Platt-Germans and Warriors of Chicago, who have to be praised for their efforts to keep up this custom. Indeed we are close to the time when the German Pentecostal celebration will be just as such established in Americans is the German Christmas Tree. The Germans delight to go into open sources, especially at this time of the spring, and they do gratify their desire to do so, but with one possible exception, the Sunday forenoon religious services. To make speeches on such occasions as this is an unknown thing to the Germans. This is a bad habit of the Americans.

    ...Today's celebration of Pentecost in the old fatherland is saddened by war clouds......

    2

    We, in this country are so much better off. True, the political and business conditions are by far not what they ought to be, but a change for the better is seen, and what is more important, this country is assured peace and unity for a long time. This prairie to which we came today to celebrate the lovely Feast of Pentecost is not that Picturesque, paradise-like valley of the beautiful Rhein, or that of the Neckars; but this prairie is beautified by the sunshine of peace and freedom....

    This friendly park, its trees and flowers, seen to have heightened their beauty for today, because alongside of their beds are walking German men and women inspired by that innermost feeling: We are Americans, as proud as anybody of the greatness and freedom of our adopted fatherland, but we are Germans also and will never depart from our German customs. we don't given up the serious and conscientious German habits, nothing of the cordiality and genuine feelings nothing of the German untiring willingness for work and nothing of the happy German spirit prevalent on work days as well as on Sundays, and certainly nothing of the German Pentecost....

    There is hardly any German whose heart action would not speed up somewhat by the mere mention of the word - Pentecost! Out there in the old fatherland this time ...

    German
    I B 4, III B 2, III H, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- December 27, 1879
    Christmas Presents at Uhlich's Orphanage

    Christmas presents were distributed yesterday afternoon at Uhlich's Orphanage, located at the corner of Burlington and Center Streets. Many members of Chicago's Lutheran parishes were present. In connection therewith let it be said, that the appeal of the asylum's executive board brought generous response from the Germans. Donors were very liberal, and so many presents were received that many were saved for another occasion.

    Members of the board, and several ladies, decorated the Christmas tree, which was mounted in the sewing room. The tree was provided by Miss Bauer, the Kindergarten teacher.

    The festivities started at 4 P. M. and several hundred people were present. The orphans, twenty-one girls and forty boys, marched from the schoolroom into the festival room, surrounded the tree and sang, "Vom Himmel Hoch Da Komm Ich Her". Pastor Hartmann preached an inspiring sermon and ended with a prayer.

    2

    Then the children sang "Ein Koenig Kommt Aus Zion," at the conclusion of which Reverend Gottlieb Blankenhahn, in charge of the Orphanage, had the children recite the prophesies of the Bible up to the time of Christ's birth.

    The tree was lit while the children sang "Welche Morgenroethe Wallet Himmelab," and, after a few more words were said about the age-old festival, the children formed into ranks again and marched and sang.

    Then the presents were distributed. At first a bag of candy and nuts, finally a toy commensurate with the child's age. The children played until 9 P. M. and then went to bed. We may well assume that all had pleasant dreams, as all departed in a very happy mood.

    Finally Reverend Mr. Hartmann addressed the visitors. The festival was undoubtedly one of the most outstanding affairs of its kind we have witnessed this year.

    Christmas presents were distributed yesterday afternoon at Uhlich's Orphanage, located at the corner of Burlington and Center Streets. Many members of Chicago's Lutheran parishes were present. In connection therewith let ...

    German
    III B 3 b, II D 4, III C, I B 4
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- October 20, 1882
    (No headline)

    Mr. August Spies spoke next commenting on each phase of the Pastor's speech and causing him much embarrassment by attacking the Church. He contended that private land ownership is a denial of the right for existence for those without any such possessions which means the "Masses" therefore are not in accord with the fundamental teachings of Christianity.

    2. Socialism is a question of economy; politically, modern Socialism is not concerned with the centralization of government power, but is rather endeavoring to decentralize it through municipal autonomy.

    3. With his development the needs, too, of the individual grows. In comparison, the conditions of the working classes are at present much worse than fifty years ago.

    4. Too long have the oppressed people looked to the Christian Church for salvation; they awoke to learn the truth. The people are aware of the fact that the chains of slavery can not be broken by a God or Saviour but, by themselves only. on the ruins of Christianity, humanity will breathe easier. Were the bloody atrocities of the inquisition not far more barbarous than those of Nero? And the burning of a large number of witches in our country only a short time ago, an act supported by your church, was that an exhibition of Christian love and humanity? The Church is the foundation pillar of this horribly barbarous system of robbery,(Capitalism). This explains why Socialism is trying to annihilate it.

    2

    Socialist Blake contended that not every Socialist is in accord with the viewpoint of Mr. Spies. Socialism asks for real Christianity but the Church has always stood on the side of the oppressor. The Catholic Church of Ireland has recently joined the party of the oppressed; the Protestant church should do likewise. Before the audience dispersed the Reverend McGregor declared that he was interested in every speaker with the exception of Mr. Spies, who, in his opinion was a scoundrel and whose loose tongue had insulted the most sacred.

    Mr. August Spies spoke next commenting on each phase of the Pastor's speech and causing him much embarrassment by attacking the Church. He contended that private land ownership is a ...

    German
    I E, I B 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 18, 1888
    Mission Festival.

    The German Evangelical Lutheran Churches of the south and south-west side of Chicago celebrated yesterday at Cheltenham Beach a mission holiday. it is customary with the Lutherans of the Missouri Synod to do so once every year. Usually several congregations celebrate together. The purpose of these meetings and festivals is to encourage the Lutherans, through sermons and personal reports, to assist their fellow-countrymen and believers in this country who are not as yet enjoying the blessings of church and school. This is being done by educating and sending itinerant preachers. The Missouri Synod has already equipped and sent into the South, the West, and the Northwest of the United States a goodly number of these preachers.

    The eight congregations which had assembled to celebrate this holiday, were those of Rev. L. Hoelter, A. Wagner, H. Engelbrecht. J. Rosenwinkel, L. Lochner, W. Uffenbeck, J. Streckfuss, and C. Leeb. There were approximately 3,000 persons present.

    Rev. J. Schuette of Milwaukee delivered an excellent and touching sermon in 2the forenoon, and Pastor Leeb gave a splendid lecture of missions during the afternoon. The audience was highly edified by the recitals of many beautiful songs and hymns.

    As closely as can be estimated now, a total amount of $1,000 will be the financial outcome of this splendid festival. This sum will be of considerable help to the work of the home missions.

    The German Evangelical Lutheran Churches of the south and south-west side of Chicago celebrated yesterday at Cheltenham Beach a mission holiday. it is customary with the Lutherans of the Missouri ...

    German
    I B 4, III C