The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Abendpost -- October 01, 1890
    Emily Rossi

    The suicide of the noted German-American actress, Emily Rossi, together with her sweetheart, Gustav Koch, is not as yet cleared up. The actress had a falling out with her mother sometime ago concerning a love affair in Germany with Felix X. His last name never could be discovered.

    Pressed by her new fiancee, Gustav Koch, to marry him, she admitted she is not able to forget her former lover, and would rather die before marrying him with the love for some one else in her heart. Both became apparently despondent over this dispute and finally decided to die together.

    The authoress Emily Rossi in Berlin, who is the mother of the dead actress, always cherished the wish, according to information on hand, that her daughter should marry a wealthy man.

    The suicide of the noted German-American actress, Emily Rossi, together with her sweetheart, Gustav Koch, is not as yet cleared up. The actress had a falling out with her mother ...

    German
    I B 3 b, I B 3 a
  • Abendpost -- November 09, 1890
    School Instruction and Home-Lessons.

    Our teachers, particularly the teachers of primary schools, are inclined to believe, that a child is the property of the School. This is an error. We have of course a law, which compels the child to go to School. As a rule, all parents are glad and willing to send the child to school for its own benefit and future. But the child belongs first and last to the family, which has the right to dispose of all free time, left for the child after leaving the school-house for home. No child should learn and study without the actual assistance of the teacher. Therefore, during the school hours the child should be completely under the guiding authority of the teacher. Home work should be avoided, as they will always interfere with the recreation and time of the child and the Home-Authority of the parents.

    Our teachers, particularly the teachers of primary schools, are inclined to believe, that a child is the property of the School. This is an error. We have of course a ...

    German
    I A 1 a, I B 3 b
  • Abendpost -- September 08, 1891
    German versus American Child Training.

    In the "Chicago Herald" we find the confession of a woman saying that the American children are often presumptive and precocious. She compares the American methods of training with the English and German and admits freely, that the children in Germany and England are better trained than in the United States, but she also finds excuses for this fact.--

    She claims that the militaristic spirit in Germany makes its influence felt in family life and that England clings to very conservative training methods. "The United States, however, is applying the principles of democracy in the treatment and raising of children. Children can think and therefore must be persuaded to obey and not forced to do so. American children must by all means be more independent than the European and therefore their self-consciousness, their ego, must be aroused early."

    This vindication is extremely weak. Sensible parents think very little of 2disciplining children by beating and forcing them into subserviency, no matter where they live. But if a child is obstinate, fresh and forward, it is evident that the parents failed to understand how to influence and mold his mind and character through wise counsel and sensible instructions. Children, who do not respect their parents and teachers, obstinately refuse to obey rules and regulations, behave unruly and shameless in the presence of guests, are not any more the product of our free institutions as, for instance, the Ward-Politicians or the tobacco-spitters. If democracy is made responsible for these phenomena, then injuctice is committed in doing so. why not expose the real cause instead of hiding behind excuses?

    In reality the lack of the democratic spirit in many families to be considered as the basic factor for the laxity in child-training. Parents fail to meet their responsibility towards society. They expect too much from the school and the government and do very little themselves. They desire that their own children as well as all the others should be trained by the paid teachers and guided in the path of virtue and moderation by the policemen's club. This is undermining their own influence in home training and they are surprised if they fail in this.

    Concerning the "American" husband it must be said, that they are too eager to leave the care of the children, the management of home and kitchen in the hands of the wife. By earning money they think they have justly met all reasonable demands. It is true that they are very tender often too tender and have

    In the "Chicago Herald" we find the confession of a woman saying that the American children are often presumptive and precocious. She compares the American methods of training with the ...

    German
    I B 3 b, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 30, 1892
    The Missouri Synod

    At the conference yesterday of the Missouri Synod the following topic came up for discussion and consultation: "The duties of the family and the Church towards our youth and their Christian training." The discussions were based on the following theses, which had been worked out by the Rev. Hoelten of the local Imamuel Church.

    1. It is an old fact and now an almost universal experience that the majority of young people are estranged from God.

    2. We can not blame God for it, but must look elsewhere for the cause.

    3. God ordained or appointed the parents to be his co-workers in the training of youth, and then the church.

    4. Whoever wants to give his children a Christian training, must be a Christian himself.

    At the conference yesterday of the Missouri Synod the following topic came up for discussion and consultation: "The duties of the family and the Church towards our youth and their ...

    German
    III C, I B 3 b, II B 2 g
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 10, 1892
    Majestic.

    According to its origin, the title Majesty does not belong to kings and emperors, but to the people. Originally it designated the highest power and dignity of the state and was attributed to the people of the Roman Republic. Majestas populi Romani - (Majesty of the Romans), that was the title originally. Kings and emperors have stolen it from the people, yielding to the precedence set by the Roman emperors.

    In the United States of America, however, one may still say, "Populi Americani Majestas" - (The majesty of the American people). Never before did the majesty of the American people appear so majestic as on November 8, 1892. Never before in the history of the world did it happen that thirteen to fourteen millions of voters made a decision in regard to their future government within a few hours, at the ballot-box, after a few months of quiet investigation and deliberation, and without shedding a drop of blood...

    Is there any comparison between a change of government executed by a great people, and the succession to a throne due to the death of the predecessor? The people of a monarchy simply have to accept a ruler, whether he is 2intellectually or morally completely unfit or not, to govern a well educated and cultured people.

    On the other hand, the American people have just elected as their president one of the two capable, trustworthy men, whom they themselves had nominated. They have chosen the one whose principles more fully correspond to their own conception of general liberty and equality.

    The American people made the decision on November 8th that there should be no second rate citizens in this country, but that all of them should enjoy equal rights, irrespective of their nationality and their mother-tongue. This is indeed a great and majestic gesture, exceedingly fitting and worthy of a gigantic nation of free citizens!

    The American people manifested on this memorable day its clear foresight and its penetrating understanding, by its decision for a moderate tariff reform, for honest money, for an administration as free as possible from party politics, for the continuation of sensible immigration, for the 3protection of the right of parents in matters of education, and against compulsory prohibition.

    Cleveland, in his enjoyment of victory will undoubtedly remember the good advice given to him personally about three months ago by a representative of this paper, our friend, W. Hesing, Four years ago he lost New York, and, as a consequence, the presidency, because he permitted himself to follow bad advice, namely, to be silent on the question of personal liberty.

    This time, however, listening to practical advice, he did express his opposition to the despotism of the prohibitionists, the suppression of foreign languages, and interference with parental rights. As a result of this, be won New York, as well as the presidency, and, in addition, he captured the states of Illinois and Wisconsin, just as the practical adviser had predicted he would do, provided he followed his advice.

    According to its origin, the title Majesty does not belong to kings and emperors, but to the people. Originally it designated the highest power and dignity of the state and ...

    German
    I A 1 b, I B 3 b, I B 2, III G, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 05, 1893
    To Fight for the Mother Tongue.

    There is a motion pending and if it is carried, the school board will be authorized to discontinue German language instruction, as well as the subjects of gymnastics, vocal music, and drawing. This is a serious below to German-Americanism and is a challenge to every one. The Germans should be victorious in this battle, due to their numerical strength, provided that they are aware of the cultural importance of these branches, and make the necessary efforts.

    The German and German-American population of Chicago is much larger than the Anglo-American one. The German language is spoken by about a half million people, and it is just as indispensable in every day social and business affairs as English. If a child masters both languages, and is well instructed in those special branches, it certainly has a better foundation, and is far better equipped for a future career, than a child without these advantages.

    Have not the Germans, in view of their numerical strength, a right to German-instruction in the public schools? Besides, there is every where an increasing demand for German; and it enables parents to train their children better, 2since they can instruct them in their mother tongue. Therefore, irrespective of the practical value of German, its moral and intellectual influence is important. The fight for the maintenance of these branches is a far reaching battle for culture, particularly in this cosmopolitan city. Every true friend of progress, irrespective of nationality, ought to be interested in this struggle.

    ... This is a battle for progress, and is directed against nativistic insolence. Nativism raises its head whenever it believes that its power is endangered; it is the result of a narrow and limited education, and its department leads to the conclusion that the worth and fitness of a citizen in this country depends entirely upon his command of English and his adaptation to English customs.

    As a convincing counter-evidence it is necessary only to point to the almost exclusively English-speaking rowdies and tramps, who maintain gambling and vice resorts, who make our streets unsafe, and who dominated the scandalous primary election, so that decent citizens turned away in disgust... This party (now fighting against German instruction in our public schools), and these contemptible tramps are indeed worthy associates of the anti-German members of the school board and of the English newspapers.

    3

    What chances for intellectual and cultural progress would there be if this clique should carry out its slogan: "America for Americans only!"

    This republic was not founded only for English speaking people and their descendants, but for the oppressed of all the countries, who through their industry and public virtues, try to make an honest and independent livelihood. The fathers and founders of our country, Washington, Jefferson, Franklin, and others, understood this, as clearly evidenced by the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.

    The same standpoint should be taken by the representatives of our free public schools.... If man is the product of his training and environment, a narrow and restricted education must, therefore, produce a narrow minded and stupid man - a selfish worshipper of money, with no ideals, whose enthusiasm can be aroused for the almighty dollar only. This is the class of people which gives us on one hand, the fast growing, prosperous exploiters of a monopolistic industrial system, and, on the other hand, the presumptuous "Know-Nothings," the intolerant, puritanical bigots...

    Progressive and liberal citizens should, therefore, never tolerate the suppression of those respective branches of instruction, but insist upon 4possible improvements of the same. No citizen should fail to sign the petitions which are now being circulated for this purpose.

    C. H.

    There is a motion pending and if it is carried, the school board will be authorized to discontinue German language instruction, as well as the subjects of gymnastics, vocal music, ...

    German
    I A 1 b, I B 3 b, I F 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 05, 1893
    An Appeal to German Women.

    It is not customary for German women to be active in politics. Their homes are their kingdoms, and their thoughts and efforts are directed towards the welfare of their families. However, unusual circumstances require unusual action. The Germans in Chicago are intensely interested at present, in whether or not German instruction in our public schools is to be continued. This matter affects the German mother and wife so deeply, and is so closely interwoven with her activities and her aims, that her public appearance is not only justified but imperative.

    Every German woman, who merely glances at our daily newspapers, is aware of the fact that instruction in German, drawing, gymnastics, and vocal music is threatened again with discontinuation. These are the subjects which have been introduced into our public schools, chiefly, because they were recommended by intelligent Germans.

    Germans, in this city, have taken up this important matter with zeal and courage. The German newspapers, without exception have defended it, and they have succeeded in having the decision of the school board in this important matter postponed. But this is by no means a favorable decision. The danger still 2exists, and is more threatening than it ever was before. It will require the utmost efforts of all educated people to win the victory in this great cause.

    For this reason the German women of Chicago should get together for consultations on how to meet this threatening danger most effectively. The school board must be convicted that the majority of our educated population recognizes the importance of the afore mentioned subjects, and desires the continuation of the same in our public schools.

    To accomplish this, some German women have come together to arouse the interest of the whole German female population of the city. They urgently appeal to all, to attend a mass meeting March 11, at 3 p. m., at the North Side Turner Hall.

    All Germans and friends of the German language are urgently and cordially invited to attend. German mothers, who have the intellectual and physical welfare of their children at heart, should not fail to come. Likewise all German teachers of private and public schools, all German women's clubs and societies should attend. We also invite German clergymen of all faiths, pedagogues, and liberal minded men, who are interested in the practical education of our youth. They are requested to participate personally in this 3movement and exert their whole influence.

    The purpose of the mass meeting is to discuss this problem from all view points, make resolutions, and secure as many signatures as possible to present to the school board.

    It is not customary for German women to be active in politics. Their homes are their kingdoms, and their thoughts and efforts are directed towards the welfare of their families. ...

    German
    I A 1 b, I B 3 b, III A, I F 3, I F 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 12, 1893
    German Women Defend German Instruction in Impressive Mass-Meeting at North Side Hall. Energetic Protest to the School Board.

    Although the weather was very unfavorable, nearly 600 German women came to a mass meeting in the North Side Turner Hall, held in the interest of retaining German instruction and other special branches in our public schools. The hall was too small to hold so many women, and many had to stand. The endurance of these courageous defenders of German in our public schools was, indeed, admirable. A deep interest and a real enthusiasm could be noticed among them.

    Of course, this great cause is of unusual interest to German mothers, since they are the natural teachers and educators and have the welfare of the growing generation at heart. The German women have furnished most convincing evidence through their demonstration yesterday, that the propaganda for the retention of German instruction and the other special branches can not be entrusted to better hands.

    2

    The courageous and energetic efforts of these German women should serve a spur for the so-called stronger sex, to likewise manifest a great zeal for this cause.

    Mrs. Dorothea Boettcher called the meeting to order. Then Mrs. H. Voss was elected Chairman, Mrs. Boettcher, Secretary, and Mrs. S. Wolf, Treasurer. Mrs. M. Werkmeister, one of the speakers, said:

    "There are many women in this meeting who are more capable than I to give you a clear analysis of the respective branches of study in danger of elimination. However, since the honor of addressing you is conferred upon me irrespective of this fact, 1 can do so only as a wife and a mother. As such only am I concerned about the school question; and to arrive at my conclusions I have not been assisted by anything but my own understanding and good sense.

    "The highest aim of a mother is the physical and spiritual welfare and progress of her children. A mother considers the school as a sacred institution.

    3

    The teachers are her friends and allies, whether or not she is closely acquainted with them. Their calling is her calling likewise, for home and school, and mother and teacher go hand in hand, as it were...

    "Our public schools have several special branches of study. Many of our citizens consider them as very useful for. the children, and the latter take advantage of this opportunity. These special studies include German, gymnastics, drawing, and singing.

    "These branches of study are stigmatized by another part of the population as "fads" or as worthless, and as such they want to banish them from our schools.

    "May I ask, how is it possible that the study of German, a world language, can be considered useless and treated accordingly in a cosmopolitan city like Chicago? Those of us who call two countries their own, who in their childhood studied two or more languages, know what treasures were opened to us. The knowledge of both languages is an advantage for our children, and 4is essential for their success. It is also of benefit to them in their social standing if they can express themselves in two different languages.

    "We have all met Americans who expressed their regret in not being able to speak German. They did not say this to please us, but had their own advantage in mind. As a mother and a wife, I appeal to you to unite your efforts in order to prevent the elimination of German instruction from our schools. Our children must not be deprived of German, because it will be of untold benefit to them later...

    "Today, here, in a city of millions, in a prosperous country, we are fighting for the same branches of study, which have been recognized as valuable factors in education, ever since schools existed!

    "Fight, my ladies, - is an ugly word, because we are German women, and German women shun fighting. We are satisfied with our sphere of activities. We do not push ourselves forward, nor do we demand anything. We live for our children only and their welfare is our aim and pride.

    5

    "These children are children of this country. Chicago is their home. They will become patriotic Americans who will love and respect their forefathers. To preserve their mother-tongue for their children is the duty of all German wives and mothers...

    "It is your immediate task to overcome your aversion to fighting. You must do everything in your power to prevent the curtailment or complete suppression of German in our schools. It is your duty to fight for progress and for companionship between mother and child. You all think as I do, or else you would not be here.

    "Let us remind the gentleman of the school board through our signatures that we consider them trustworthy men, the protectors of our rights, to whom we have entrusted the welfare of our children.

    "let us tell them that we do not believe that a branch of study, such as German, should be banished from our schools, because it is of so much benefit to the children in the future.

    6

    "If complaints are made about these branches of study, or if the results obtained are not satisfactory, then improvements should be made. We do not believe that these studies should be banished from our schools because of complaints. And we, the German women of Chicago, shall be the first ones to support any improvement, provided that it promotes our cause."

    Mrs. Brown, president of the Chicago Women's Alliance requested permission to speak. This woman is well known in American society. She gave a very intelligent and brief speech in English, in which she expressed her joy concerning the interest manifested in these special branches of study by her German-American sisters. She criticized the school board for the absurd assertion that the city can not afford to spend the money for the special studies any longer.

    "For the education of our youth," she continued, "no sacrifice' is too great. Every sensible taxpayer is willing to do his share." She recommended very vigorously, not only the retention but also an addition of suitable special studies. In closing her remarks she expressed the hope that in the future American and German women would cooperate more closely in the field of 7education and similar matters.

    Miss Mary Burt, a member of the school board, was the next speaker. Miss Burt is heartily in favor of German instruction in all the grades of our schools. Not only did she defend it at yesterday's meeting, but she also does so at sessions of the board. Again she emphasized the fact that the best part of the English language is of German origin, and that German is entitled to be studied in American schools.

    The speeches of both American ladies were received with enthusiastic applause. The whole audience arose to give recognition to Miss Burt for her great efforts in behalf of German instruction.

    After the speeches came the reading of the following protest in German and English, written by Mrs. D. Boettcher, which will be presented to the school board:

    8

    The Protest.

    "To the Honorable Members of the School Board of Chicago:

    "The signatures below are those of Chicago women whose children attend public schools. These women held a mass meeting on Saturday, March 11th, and resolved to present a petition requesting the Board to retain in our public schools the so-called special branches, such as German, gymnastics, singing, drawing and sewing for the following reasons:

    "First, the above mentioned subjects are indispensable to a thorough public education in our age. By restricting or banishing the same, many parents would have to take their children out of the public schools, and place them in private or parochial schools.

    "Second, because a school in which the most elementary branches only are taught, is not achieving its primary objective of being the educational 9institution of a people destined to govern itself. One of the cardinal duties of a republic, like ours, is the education of the masses. We would consider it an injustice against the growing generation, if a city like Chicago should reduce its educational institutions to mere pauper schools, notwithstanding the fact that Chicago is rich and prosperous and presumably at the head of progress and civilization. To furnish such a spectacle of retrogression to the civilized world, which is looking to us today more than ever before, would be, indeed, very humiliating and confusing for us, inasmuch as the whole world is progressing in culture very rapidly.

    "Third, we have convinced ourselves that the overwhelming majority of the citizens of Chicago are ready and willing to pay the small extra expense for a better education for their children, because such an investment bears a high rate of interest, not only for the individual, but also for the whole community. The better the growing generation is prepared and equipped for the struggles and duties of the future, the more useful will be their services to their country. There will be also less danger of their going astray, or becoming dependent on public charity. Better schools and 10educational institutions will reduce the number of poor houses and jails. Under no consideration should the school problem become a question of money.

    "Fourth, the study of another language besides the native one is of inestimable benefit to every child. Goethe, the great poet and scholar, asserted, and all the pedagogues have confirmed, that "whoever knows no foreign language, knows nothing of his own.' Likewise, experience in our schools has taught us that those children who participated in German instruction were able to pass the examinations from grade to grade just as well as the others, and, in many instances, even better. Undoubtedly the German language only can come into consideration as a second language next to English, because one-third of Chicago's population speaks and understands German. It is also true that this instruction should begin as early as possible, preferably in the lower grades, in order to obtain results. This would enable many of the poorer children who usually quit school early to get at least a foundation, upon which they can build later in life, if they are ambitious.

    "Fifth, it is said that the time devoted to German is at the expense of the 11study of English, but this reason is just as untenable as the question of space. In regard to the question of space we point out that according to official reports all children, who have been registered until now, have also been placed. The introduction of half-days in the lower grades has not been considered a detriment, because most parents are of the opinion that three hours per day of school is sufficient for small children.

    "Sixth, gymnastics in our schools are an absolute necessity. The development of the body must keep pace with intellectual progress. The former is just as essential and is never underestimated nor neglected by any pedagogue of the civilised world. The health of the children is just as important to the parents and to the state as their intellectual development. The school is to a certain extent responsible for the health of the pupils. Of equal importance is the instruction in drawing. It is a training in skill which is basic in nearly every trade and profession. And what drawing is to the boys, needlework is to the girls. Many of the girls have no opportunity in their homes to learn how to sew, hence the school is an appropriate place for it. Finally, vocal music can be justified from an ethical standpoint. Singing affects the mind of the child in a stimulating, uplifting and ennobling 12manner, and discloses to the child an ideal world in the midst of the crass materialism of our age.

    "All these branches, important and necessary in themselves, add variety to the general instruction. Since the child can grasp only a little at a time a change, and a variety in the branches of study, constitutes an important factor in his education.

    "Being convinced of the above facts, we, the undersigned, feel under obligation not to deprive our children of any of the mentioned subjects in our public schools. On the contrary, we will strive to have them improved and enlarged so that public education may gradually reach the highest peak possible, for the benefit of our children and to the advantage of our country.

    "In this sense, we, the women citizens of Chicago, request the honorable school board to examine our petition. We have the welfare of our children at heart. We trust that the reasons we have stated shall possess sufficient persuasive power to refute all the proposals of any opponents."

    13

    The protest was approved unanimously. Blanks were distributed among the women, and all of them promised to get as many signatures of married women as they possibly could. The assemblage expressed its gratitude to Mrs. Boettcher for the excellent wording of the petition, and for her other efforts.

    A committee was then appointed to present the protest to the school board at its next session. Mrs. Dorothea Boettcher will act as the spokesman of the committee.

    Although the weather was very unfavorable, nearly 600 German women came to a mass meeting in the North Side Turner Hall, held in the interest of retaining German instruction and ...

    German
    I A 1 b, III A, II B 3, I B 3 b, I C, I K, IV
  • Abendpost -- June 15, 1894
    Observance of the Sabbath.

    Regardless of Party lines and religion, this newspaper always has represented the standpoint of the German elements in this city concerning all community-affairs.

    After 6 days of work and toiling, the Germans want to enjoy life freely on Sunday, As they see the Sabbath, some people will go to the Church in the morning. Many more people will go in the afternoon to theaters and afterwards to cafes and Restaurants. Some other people will stay at home or flock to saloons to meet old friends and make new acquaintances. Sunday nights should be reserved for family affairs, dances and other entertainments. That is the way we Germans want to enjoy life on a carefree Sunday.

    The latest adopted Sabbath city ordinance is reflecting the German standpoint and must be rightfully called an achievement of German cultural thought in bitter opposition to the Puritan standpoint, as voiced by the Anglo-American Press, which wants to give to the American people a dead Sunday, with the silence of a graveyard and bare of any joys of life, to which we are all entitled.

    Regardless of Party lines and religion, this newspaper always has represented the standpoint of the German elements in this city concerning all community-affairs. After 6 days of work and toiling, ...

    German
    I B 2, I C, I B 3 b, I B 3 c, III C, I F 4
  • Abendpost -- August 03, 1894
    The Fight against Crime

    The last edition of the "Forum" is bringing an interesting editorial concerning the punishment of crimes and the destruction of dangerous enemies of human society.

    The said editorial is leaving out deliberately the main argument on crime-its causes and reasons.

    Crime always have been, since man existed, and crime probably never will be wiped out entirely. But crime can be decreased to an endurable minimum if the root of crime is eliminated thoroughly.

    As a rule, all children of this world, going through schools and with the same advices of parents, are getting the same chance to forge ahead and become useful members of the community. There is no doubt, that every child, often leaving school, will enter the danger period of life. It is then, when strict supervision from parents should guide the younster along.

    2

    Then also, the community, should add a generous share of free instruction and plenty of working opportunities. All this combined, will make our young generation and keep the dangers of crime down, regardless of surroundings, inheritance haunt and temptation.

    The last edition of the "Forum" is bringing an interesting editorial concerning the punishment of crimes and the destruction of dangerous enemies of human society. The said editorial is leaving ...

    German
    I B 3 b, II E 3