The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 26, 1862
    Quarterly Report of the President of the Chicago Arbeiter-Verein (Published at the request of the Verein)

    Despite the fact that the entrance fee was raised last winter, the membership of the Chicago Arbeiter-Verein has steadily increased. The new constitution has been printed and every member has received a copy. As far as we can judge at this time, the Verein will do well under it. The finances of the Verein are in good condition. The library of the Verein has been enlarged considerably, and the members have contributed their share to charity. It is hardly necessary to remind the members that the Verein is obligated to participate in every good work. Thus far, the organization has a good record in this respect.

    The following contributions were made for benevolent purposes during the past six months:

    2

    For Hecker's Regiment.....................$ 50.00

    For the wives of Union soldiers.......... 205.00

    For sick and wounded soldiers............ 50.00

    Total.........................................$305.00

    I thank the members and friends of the Verein who have assisted in obtaining these contributions.

    Disbursements for Library

    For periodicals:

    From November, 1861 to February, 1862...........$ 35.00

    From February, 1862 to May, 1862................... 37.00

    Total.....................................................$ 72.00

    3

    For books and binding:

    From November, 1861 to February, 1862...$135.00

    From February, 1862 to May, 1862............. 88.00

    Total.............................................$223.00

    If the library of a society may be considered a barometer of the educational standing of the members, we can view our shelves and cases with great satisfaction, since we have purchased the works of Dickens, Sir Walter Scott, Feuerbach, Hacklaender, Freiligrath, Cooper, Auerbach, Spindler, etc. The report of the librarian shows that our members are making good use of this source of education.

    The English night school which our Verein maintains for the benefit of the members has been in session regularly throughout the winter, which shows that our members also appreciate this opportunity to acquire knowledge. And the attendance would certainly have been much larger if the school were more 4centrally located, and if many had not been prevented by business, work, etc. from attending the school.

    The Verein also provided for the choral section. The entertainment given for the benefit of our singers netted $47.72, and this sum was turned over to the treasurer with the express understanding that he use the money to purchase music, etc.

    Fortunately, there were not many cases of sickness among the members; we seldom had more than three cases at a time, and there were no deaths.

    Our affiliation with the Peoria Arbeiter-Verein, should it materialize, will be the first step in our endeavor to spread the principles laid down in our constitution. It is desirable that our members who make their homes in other cities try to organize an Arbeiterverein there, using our constitution as a model, so that eventually anyone who leaves Chicago and settles in some other city will find an affiliated society in which he may become a member, and thus continue to 5receive the benefits which he now enjoys as a member of the Chicago Arbeiter-Verein.

    Our Sunday evening entertainments have always been very well attended. It would be a great advantage to the members if the committee on lectures could provide for a lecture every two weeks. Besides stimulating the mind and increasing the knowledge of ambitious members and their friends, such lectures would, in my opinion, be the best means of getting rid of the class of people that thinks only of itself and its amusement and gives no thought to the responsibility which the Verein assumes when it arranges for this kind of entertainment. Let no one say that these people are afflicted with boredom only at certain lectures. The fact is that they are bored at every serious lecture. That was proved at the lecture on the death of Lovejoy, a martyr to the cause of liberty. Fortunately, there are only a few who place little value on education, and the sooner these people cease coming to our hall when serious topics are discussed, the better it will be for all concerned. And even if the subject matter is above the mental capacity of some of those who come to the meeting place of the Verein, they ought 6to have manners enough not to disturb those who want to listen, and should show enough respect for the lecturer to be quiet at least while he is speaking.....

    At the last meeting, the members elected a committee which has the duty of obtaining fuel at less than retail cost. I have a recommendation to make in regard to this matter. The Verein has some money in a bank. How about using it to buy fuel at wholesale for the benefit of members, and the treasury of the Verein? If each member should save only fifty cents by buying a ton of coal from the Verein, and the Verein should realize seventy-five cents on the transaction, the member would have a substantial saving, and, with coal at four dollars per ton, the Verein's money would have an earning capacity as follows:

    Net profit on investment $100 $18.75
    " " " " 400 75.00
    " " " " 533 100.00
    7

    That certainly is more than a bank pays, or can pay. And that is but three fifths of the entire profit, since the fifty cents saved by the purchaser must be considered also. Thus, if we would invest the whole of our bank balance ($533), the entire profit would be $100 for the Verein and $66.66 for the members. That would be a gain of 311/4 per cent, and the danger of loss would be eliminated because all transactions would be for cash only. I recommend that the Verein give this matter serious consideration.

    At the end of the last quarter the membership of the Verein was 389, a gain of 49.

    I have the great pleasure of informing you that a much friendlier spirit now prevails in our business meetings. When there is debating, it is done with less bitterness, and without sarcastic references to individuals. Thus the spirit of brotherhood is growing stronger, and as long as it asserts its power, the Verein will flourish.

    Theodor Hielscher,

    President of Chicago Arbeiter-Verein

    Despite the fact that the entrance fee was raised last winter, the membership of the Chicago Arbeiter-Verein has steadily increased. The new constitution has been printed and every member has ...

    German
    II D 1, II B 2 a, II B 2 f, II B 2 g, II B 1 a, II D 10, I A 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 09, 1875
    The Chicago Athenaeum

    The Chicago Athenaeum's evening school will commence the fall semester in about two weeks. A class is contemplated for Germans who desire to obtain a thorough knowledge of English. If the class is organized, Professor Groh will be the instructor. He has taught German at the Athenaeum for two years.

    All who desire to be enrolled in the class are asked to apply promptly so that their names may be recorded.

    The directorate of the Athenaeum intends to increase the scope of the institution. Anyone will be accepted, regardless of creed, sex or nationality, provided that he is of irreproachable character.

    A gymnasium connected with the institution; gives ample opportunity for bodily development.

    2

    Further particulars may be learned at the headquarters, at 63--65 Washington Street.

    The Chicago Athenaeum's evening school will commence the fall semester in about two weeks. A class is contemplated for Germans who desire to obtain a thorough knowledge of English. If ...

    German
    II B 2 f, I A 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 11, 1879
    Athenaeum

    English instruction will be given at the Athenaeum, 50 Dearborn Street, next Monday. The course is available to all Germans who wish to study English--reading, writing, and speaking are taught quickly. The aim is to provide an elementary knowledge of English, so that recent arrivals [from Europe] will find it easier to get a job.

    Men and women of any age are eligible.

    English instruction will be given at the Athenaeum, 50 Dearborn Street, next Monday. The course is available to all Germans who wish to study English--reading, writing, and speaking are taught ...

    German
    I A 3
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- April 11, 1880
    Education

    All the readers of the Arbeiter Zeitung will be very happy to learn that we are going to erect a school for the purpose of educating immigrant Germans in the ways of U. S. A. The name for the school is "Chicago Athenaum, 48-54 S. Dearborn Street. The students will learn the English language, algebra, writing and bookkeeping, and the tuition will be very low so that everybody can benefit by the school.- Professor A. Grath will be the leader.

    The Comrades will recommend the school, and it will mean so much for the newcomer to learn the English language correctly. The next term of school will start April 12th. The classes are held in the evening so that everybody may attend.

    All the readers of the Arbeiter Zeitung will be very happy to learn that we are going to erect a school for the purpose of educating immigrant Germans in the ...

    German
    II B 2 f, I A 3, III A, III G
  • Abendpost -- September 26, 1891
    Evening School at St. Jacoby Church

    The Evangelic-Lutheran St. Jacob's Church is reopening their evening school and will continue for five months.

    This school gives courses in bookkeeping, arithmetic, correspondence, drawing, reading, spelling, history, etc. Able teachers have been engaged for the season.

    Since the fees are very low, even poorer classes will have an opportunity for intellectual development.

    From 50-75 students attended the school last season and the results were very satisfactory.

    The Evangelic-Lutheran St. Jacob's Church is reopening their evening school and will continue for five months. This school gives courses in bookkeeping, arithmetic, correspondence, drawing, reading, spelling, history, etc. Able ...

    German
    II B 2 f, I A 3, III C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 26, 1891
    Evening School at the St. Jacobi Church.

    The German Evangelical Lutheran Church. St. Jacobi, located at Fremont street and Garfield Avenue has arranged evening classes, which will start October 5th and continue until March 26, 1892, a period of about six months. A very efficient staff of teachers has been engaged for this school, and instructions will be given in bookkeeping, mathematics, correspondence, drawing, reading, spelling, history, etc. An opportunity is hereby presented to all to advance their education, because the fees are very low. During the past semester the school was attended by fifty to seventy five persons, and the results have been satisfactory in general.

    The German Evangelical Lutheran Church. St. Jacobi, located at Fremont street and Garfield Avenue has arranged evening classes, which will start October 5th and continue until March 26, 1892, a ...

    German
    II B 2 f, I A 3, III C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 03, 1893
    The Rebendorf School of Languages and Painting

    The institution located at No. 205 Cass St. supplies a long felt want, as it gives grown persons an opportunity to resume their neglected linguistic and artistic studies.

    The head of this academy has obtained her scholastic degrees in Germany and France. She has also gained considerable experience in the teaching profession as she has been teaching in many colleges.

    Languages are taught through conversation; use promotes proficiency, as it compels the student to think in the new language. Those who wish to study, so as to prepare themselves for the teaching profession, will be thoroughly grounded in history, literature and educational methods.

    Good opportunities are provided for those who wish to develop their artistic 2proclivities. Copies of famous masterworks from the Louvre and the palace of Luxemburg in Paris, such as Claude Lorraine, Millet, Dagnon, Bouveret, Ponot, Billotte etc., are available. The thoughts of the classical masters lend themselves to observation and analysis.

    The Fall course commences next Wednesday, September 6. Applications for enrollment are accepted any day.

    The institution located at No. 205 Cass St. supplies a long felt want, as it gives grown persons an opportunity to resume their neglected linguistic and artistic studies. The head ...

    German
    II B 2 f, I A 3
  • Abendpost -- September 17, 1894
    A German Section of the University Extension

    What is a University Extension? A University is concentrating its system of instruction particularly on students, who have graduated from High Schools and subsequently registered with the University for further education. Since 1887, there has been a strong movement to establish university extensions, which have the purpose of giving the benefit of a university education also to persons, who went only through primary schools but have the ambition to study and enlarge their intellectual horizon. The said university extension is carried out by local or travelling lectures, mail and also by libraries.

    Judge Brentano has taken up the task of cooperating with the Universities of Chicago to establish a German University Extension, which will lend its education service especially to the German elements of one population.

    This German University Extension will be organized and conducted by Professor A.T. Small, Dr. O.T. Thatcher and Dr. A. Wirth.

    What is a University Extension? A University is concentrating its system of instruction particularly on students, who have graduated from High Schools and subsequently registered with the University for further ...

    German
    I A 3
  • Abendpost -- September 07, 1911
    Germanism in Schools

    Interesting disclosures on Germanism were made yesterday at the meeting of the Board of Education when Mrs. Ella Flagg Young, the superintendent of schools, read the annual report. The largest groups attending elementary and high school classes in evening schools are German, according to the report read. During the past school year not less than 2,616 German pupils, Swiss and Austrians not included, have enrolled in the elementary classes, while 1,750 have taken advantage of high school classes in the evening schools. There were also 652 Austrians enrolled in the elementary classes and 73 in the high school classes of the evening schools. Natives of Switzerland attending the evening schools altogether were 44. of the 2,616 German students who attended the elementary classes of the evening schools, 880 were native Americans.

    The German element is leading in high school attendance by a great majority. The next largest group is the Irish, which is 616; followed by the Swedish, 587; The Poles, 397; the Russians, 343; the English, 263; the Bohemians, 261; and the Norwegians, 197. China, Cuba, 2Egypt, Turkey, and the Isle of Manx (noted for its stump-tailed cats), were represented by one member each....

    Statistics reveal that 87 males and 70 females have taken advantage of the German instructions in evening schools during the past school year. In regard to elementary schools, no record of the number of students taking the study of German was available. However, Gertrud E. English, the district superintendent, informed the meeting that the German classes were considerably larger since a modification of rules governing that subject was introduced. According to her, the study of German has been added to the curriculum of a number of other schools as the direct result of the change of rules. "Moreover," said Miss English, "Taking the method of teaching into consideration, I fully share the opinion expressed by teachers in general that the abolition of the instruction of German grammar would prove essential. Fluency of expression could be obtained more easily by devoting more time to the instruction of writing, reading, and conversation. The German language should be taught, but its instruction should be so organized 3that proportionate progress would be the result of every successive lesson, until a reasonable fluency would be obtained....Every school that includes German in its curriculum should employ a special instructor for that subject; in many instances this special instructor could give his services to two schools".....

    Interesting disclosures on Germanism were made yesterday at the meeting of the Board of Education when Mrs. Ella Flagg Young, the superintendent of schools, read the annual report. The largest ...

    German
    I A 1 a, I A 1 b, I A 3, I C
  • Abendpost -- February 24, 1916
    Course for Baker Apprentices [Lane Technical High School Offers It]

    The Lane Technical high School offers a course for baker apprentices and thus far 120 applications have been received. Instruction is not merely confined to general practical suggestions about baking, cake ornaments, etc., but includes a course on the chemical components of flour and yeast.

    Frank Hafner of the Bakers Union, and J. Vieser, who graduated in Zuerich, Switzerland, constitute the teaching staff.

    The Lane Technical high School offers a course for baker apprentices and thus far 120 applications have been received. Instruction is not merely confined to general practical suggestions about baking, ...

    German
    I A 3