The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Onze Toekomst -- April 06, 1906
    [Roseland General Dutch League Entertains]

    The division Roseland of the "General Dutch League" gave an entertainment Thursday, March 29, in the "Leandia Hall" with great success. More than two hundred persons were present and the program was liked by everyone. Every time the opportunity presents itself the Dutch American again feels that he has not forgotten the land and people and especially the language which he formerly called his own.

    And why should he forget them? He cannot know the history, the quality of the people, and the Dutch national institutions unless he is proud of them. The division expects to raise its membership to two hundred names.

    The division Roseland of the "General Dutch League" gave an entertainment Thursday, March 29, in the "Leandia Hall" with great success. More than two hundred persons were present and the ...

    Dutch
    III B 2, III H
  • Onze Toekomst -- April 13, 1906
    Chicago Division of the General Dutch League

    At the last held executive meeting,of the Chicago division of the General Dutch League, the program was decided upon for the coming meeting Tuesday evening, in the Church of the First Christian Reformed Congregation on 14th Street. Of this meeting you will find an announcement in this number of Onze Toekomst. We can add nothing to this except to state, that everyone who is interested in the well-being of our people, here and in the Netherlands and in all corners of the world, is energetically invited, not to let this opportunity pass by. Let us as Dutchmen support the well-being and prosperity of our people, especially where this is so closely connected with the wellbeing of this land, our newly accepted Fatherland. At this executive meeting it was also decided to establish a respectable Dutch library, the details to be worked out later. This work was started by a gift of $50.00, which was our division's share of a donation to the General Dutch League of $500.00, by H. M. Queen Wilhelmina, for the purpose to spend among the Netherlanders who live abroad, in this case those who live in Chicago. The library will be named "The Queen Wilhelmina Library", in her honor. The adminstration hesitated somewhat to make the above mentioned decision, not knowing whether the attendance would be sufficient to justify the establishment of such a library. We are happy nevertheless that this decision was made, because nothing else could serve better to teach our people Dutch grammar, knowledge and wisdom of all descriptions, as a respectable gathering of Dutch literature.

    At the last held executive meeting,of the Chicago division of the General Dutch League, the program was decided upon for the coming meeting Tuesday evening, in the Church of the ...

    Dutch
    III B 2, II B 2 a, III H
  • Onze Toekomst -- June 08, 1906
    [Christian Schools Get Picture of Queen Wilhelmina]

    The administration of the Chicago Division of the General Dutch League, decided on their last meeting to present to the different Dutch Christian Schools in Chicago and to the Theological Schools at Holland and Grand Rapids, Michigan, a beautifully colored picture of Her Majesty, Queen Wilhelmina.

    The administration of the Chicago Division of the General Dutch League, decided on their last meeting to present to the different Dutch Christian Schools in Chicago and to the Theological ...

    Dutch
    III B 2, I A 2 a, III H
  • Onze Toekomst -- January 25, 1907
    Report of the Chicago Division of the General Dutch League for the Year 1906-7

    Mr. President, Ladies and Gentlemen:

    To appear before you this evening to offer you the second annual report of our division, affords me much pleasure and I trust, it will be the same to you. If many had expected, that our division would have ceased to exist, that thought, luckily was not confirmed; just the opposite, according to all indications, it has come to stay. Compared to human life, our division has reached the age, in which one learns to walk. But you know, how the child at that time needs the aid of other.... Taken as a whole, the year 1906, for us, can be successful. The board has been able to convene regularly each month, and the minutes can prove to you, that not alone through faithful, attendance, but also through earnest consideration, it has indicated that it has the welfare of our division at heart. Two open, and two ordinary meetings were held in the past year. The first open meeting took place on April 17, in the First Christian Reformed Church 14th Street. The speaker for that evening was Rev. Broekstra of Englewood. He made a beautiful speech on the subject: "lasting relationship with the Dutch race is necessary for those of Dutch descent in this country to be a blessing for the American people".... The second open meeting was held on August 31 (Queens day) in the First Reformed Church on Hastings street. The President, then, gave us an 2historic resume of the house of Orange, and sketched for us the meaning of that day for the Dutch people and for us. The main speaker, Rev. Breen, after that, spoke on the topic: "The influence of the Republic of the Netherlands on that of the United States of North America," The speaker said, in a way all his own, that, although language and grammar, make it look as though every thing here is inherited from England, this in truth is not the case, which is plainly shown by the following oppositions: in England, rule by the Aristocracy, here equality; in England, church ruled by the state, here division of Church and State; in England a difference in election, etc. etc. After that he pointed out, what an influence had gone out from the Netherlands, and reminded us of the Union of Utrecht, the stay of the Puritans in the Netherlands, etc, and ended with the assertion; that the union of the different peoples here, is fulfillment of the prophescy of the union of the people on earth.

    On the regular meeting, held on June 12, an interesting debate was delivered by Messrs. De Boer and Dr. Birkhof, the subject: "We must maintain our distinctive nationality here, as long as possible;" and on the regular meeting of October 30, a debate was also held between the Messrs. Holstein and Emmering on the Topic: "A seat of learning for the Dutch language in our universities is necessary, so that we may know our American institutions." Added to this, there were held on the above mentioned meeting some recitations by the Messrs. Ottenhof. Holstein 3historic resume of the house of Orange, and sketched for us the meaning of that day for the Dutch people and for us. The main speaker, Rev. Breen, after that, spoke on the topic: "The influence of the Republic of the Netherlands on that of the United States of North America," The speaker said, in a way all his own, that, although language and grammar, make it look as though every thing here is inherited from England, this in truth is not the case, which is plainly shown by the following oppositions: in England, rule by the Aristocracy, here equality; in England, church ruled by the state, here division of Church and State; in England a difference in election, etc. etc. After that he pointed out, what an influence had gone out from the Netherlands, and reminded us of the Union of Utrecht, the stay of the Puritans in the Netherlands, etc, and ended with the assertion; that the union of the different peoples here, is fulfillment of the prophescy of the union of the people on earth.

    On the regular meeting, held on June 12, an interesting debate was delivered by Messrs. De Boer and Dr. Birkhof, the subject: "We must maintain our distinctive nationality here, as long as possible;" and on the regular meeting of October 30, a debate was also held between the Messrs. Holstein and Emmering on the Topic: "A seat of learning for the Dutch language in our universities is necessary, so that we may know our American institutions." Added to this, there were held on the above mentioned meeting, some recitations by the Messrs. Ottenhof, Holstein 4and Koelikamp. Through the medium of the executive board, we received a gift from Queen Wilhelmina of fifty Florins, which gave momentum to the establishment of a Wilhelmina - Library, for which the first shipment of books can be expected soon. Correspondence with the Dutch Chamber of Commerce at New York was had, with the view of organizing such a Chamber of Commerce in Chicago, but the Board considered it necessary not to go into such an undertaking for the present, on account of the many hardships connected with it. The correspondence with the executive Board has been regularly kept up and was always of a friendly nature. Lately there has also been correspondence with the Book committee. From the West - Indies we received an inquirey about conditions in the United States for the benefit of a very promising and brilliant young man. We also received a letter from Denver - Colorado, for information concerning a certain branch of trade, and from Asia fro information and help for the building of a factory for the manufacture of Cotton - seed oil. A report of the Chamber of Commerce of Smyrna was sent to us, and one from Haarlem of the Colonial Museum, which is located there. From the executive Board we receive monthly, propaganda numbers of Neerlandia. (Official publication of the General Dutch League). They also mailed us 25 pictures of H. M. Wilhelmina, which were gratis and 25 at our request, for the low price of 30 Dutch cents, a piece. Besides every member having received one, the picture also decorates the walls of the Theological School in Grand Rapids, the Theological Seminary at Holland, Mich., and the Christian 5and the Christian Schools 104th Street and Englewood. From this you will get an idea of some of the work we seek to accomplish. Our membership, which last year had mounted to 30, is now increased by 8, that would be a membership of 38, but during the past year 4 resigned and 2 were scratched by the Board. Thus the members in good standing actually count 32. The By - laws were amended so that the Board has control over the acceptance of all new members. In 1905 we were exempt from contributing to the general fund, but this year we did not take advantage of that privilege and sent our share to the executive Board. Even then the Treasurer's book closed with a net balance. From the outside we were treated royally. The use of the Churches was gratis and the singing school and men's choir served us gratis. Looking back on the year just passed, we have reasons to be thankful and that gives us courage to face the future hopefully. Naturally we have not yet reached our goal, but in the Division itself, signs of life are beginning to show, and if I am not mistaken, these signs are an assurance for the acquisition perfection.

    H. Jacobsma, Secretary.

    Mr. President, Ladies and Gentlemen: To appear before you this evening to offer you the second annual report of our division, affords me much pleasure and I trust, it will ...

    Dutch
    III B 4, II B 2 d 2, II B 2 a, III B 1, III H
  • Onze Toekomst -- August 09, 1907
    Consul Birkhoff Returns

    Our Consul-General, Honorable George Birkhoff Jr., who with his wife and son made a trip to Holland, returned Monday via S. S. New Amsterdam of the Holland-America Line, and arrived in Chicago on Tuesday morning.

    During his sojourn over there Mr. Birkhoff was received in audience by Queen Wilhelmina at the Royal Palace at"Het Loo".

    "The Queen showed great interest in the prosperity of the Dutch in America", Mr. Birkhoff said.

    She inquired especially about Dutch living conditions in America, and showed particular interest in the Dutch who settled in Chicago and in Michigan. Her Majesty has requested me to give her regards and best wishes to her country people in America.

    Our Consul-General, Honorable George Birkhoff Jr., who with his wife and son made a trip to Holland, returned Monday via S. S. New Amsterdam of the Holland-America Line, and arrived ...

    Dutch
    III H
  • Onze Toekomst -- December 13, 1907
    A Chair for the Dutch Language, Literature and History at Our University

    It is well known that the Chicago Section of the General Netherlands' League is trying to obtain a Chair in the Dutch Language, History, and Literature at the University of Chicago, and a prediction has been made in reference to it. The Chicago Section received from the Board of Directors at Dordrecht, Netherlands, the following letter:

    To The Board of Directors of the Chicago Section!

    Gentlemen;

    In answer to your letter of September 14, at our Board of Directors meeting of October 23, we decided to inform you, that it is with the greatest of pleasure, we have taken cognizance of your efforts, to establish a Chair for the Dutch Language, Literature and History in the University of Chicago. We hope you succeed.

    2

    The first movement shall be of very great importance. If a Dutch teacher is appointed at one of the American Universities, then, through the great competition among the Universities, the others will follow. And as one nation has the right to show its civilization and principles in your country, then, it is by all means "The Netherlands".

    With interest we are following your activities in this affair, and at all times we will be glad to hear the progress made in this matter.

    Very truly yours.

    By The Board of Directors,

    H. Kiewiet de Tonge, President;

    W. Dicke, Secretary.

    3

    A short contents of the petition which the Section of Chicago has brought into circulation to be signed is of the following effect:

    To The Trustees of the University-Senate of Chicago;

    Chicago, Illinois.,

    Gentlemen;

    We, the undersigned, of Dutch origin, and who are in sympathy with the purpose of making the people of America acquainted with the Dutch history, literature and language, humbly request, the eraction of a Chair for the study of Dutch history, literature and language, at the University of Chicago, this Chair also comprising the now existing sub-division of Netherlands' Art, in the Division of Art, at the University.

    We are requesting this of you, in earnest, for the sake of the great value of Dutch history itself.

    4

    The peculiar and intimate relations "The Netherlands" have had and still have with the United States, in the colonizing of the Dutch, in several Eastern States, and immigration of a later date, encouraged public interest in the Dutch art and literature, by every nationality.

    Furthermore we point out such need of a Chair, because Chicago, and its celebrated Universities are situated in the center of three quarters of the present Dutch immigrants, of the United States, and also because the University of Chicago has several individuals of Dutch origin as students. Already a division of Netherlands' art is established. This fact shows undisputably, this University to be, the center of Dutch civilization and influence in the United States.

    Hereby we assure the University of Chicago with all our hearts, moral support and if possible financial help in case a Chair as above described, should be erected at the University.

    It is well known that the Chicago Section of the General Netherlands' League is trying to obtain a Chair in the Dutch Language, History, and Literature at the University of ...

    Dutch
    I A 1 b, III B 2, III H, I C, I J
  • Onze Toekomst -- April 03, 1908
    Queen Wilhelmina

    This is our premium!

    For this opportunity we have waited a long time. Listen!

    Through a special arrangement with the celebrated Verbeck Studios we are able to offer to the readers of our paper, as a special premium absolutely free of charge, a beautiful picture of Her Majesty Queen Wilhelmina, the beloved ruler of the Netherlands, our Queen.

    It is an exact copy of the celebrated steel engraving by Verbeck. This beautiful engraving was executed by special permission of the Queen, and the original is in possession of Her Majesty.

    It is the same picture, only a little different in color, of which the Chicago Section of the General Netherland's League presented copies to the Dutch 2schools in Chicago, to Hope College at Holland, Michigan, and to the Theological School at Grand Rapids.

    This is our premium! For this opportunity we have waited a long time. Listen! Through a special arrangement with the celebrated Verbeck Studios we are able to offer to the ...

    Dutch
    III H, II B 2 d 1
  • Onze Toekomst -- September 04, 1908
    General Netherlands League, Chicago Section

    The meeting of the General Netherlands League, which was held Monday night at the First Christian Reformed Church of Englewood, was a great success. In spite of the warm weather the meeting was well attended, and the people present listened to the speakers with undeviating attention. One could see that the matter aroused great interest.

    The president, Dr. E. Breen, announced that the board of directors, in the name of the Section, had sent a telegram with best wishes to Her Majesty the Queen of Holland in remembrance of her birthday anniversary.

    The meeting of the General Netherlands League, which was held Monday night at the First Christian Reformed Church of Englewood, was a great success. In spite of the warm weather ...

    Dutch
    III B 2, III H
  • Onze Toekomst -- October 09, 1908
    Dr. H Bavinck, Professor at the University, Amsterdam

    Dr. Bavinck and wife are this week the guests of our Dutch folks in Chicago. Both will have a busy time during their stay in this city. The nominating committee has planned the following program:

    Wednesday afternoon arrival by train at Englewood, whereupon the married couple will reside in the residence of Mrs. Broekstra of the First Reformed Congregation, and in the evening a reception will take place there.

    Thursday, accompanied by the members of the Englewood Committee, and their ladies, an automobile ride through the City, visiting the principal sights, In the evening, a sermon in the First Baptist Church, 63rd Street and Englewood Avenue.

    2

    Friday to the West-Side as guests of Dr. and Mrs. Breen of the First Christian Reformed Church; in the evening a lecture in the New American Hall, at 18th Street.

    Saturday to Roseland, where Dr. H. Bavinck will preach three sermons, and the following Monday night a lecture at the First Reformed Church at 107th Street.

    Dr. Bavinck and wife are this week the guests of our Dutch folks in Chicago. Both will have a busy time during their stay in this city. The nominating committee ...

    Dutch
    III H, II B 2 g, III C
  • Onze Toekomst -- January 08, 1909
    Mr. H. Vander Ploeg's St. Nicholas Speech (Editorial)

    In the Record Herald of December 9, 1908, there appears a reprint of the speech, delivered by Mr. H. Van der Ploeg, at the dinner of St. Nicholas Society, in which the Hollanders in America, especially if they are supporters of Christian education, are being put on trial in such a way, that cannot pass unnoticed.

    To my great pleasure, I noticed that Onzetoekomst already reflected on it, in its issue of December 25, in which unreservedly takes up the challenge for Christian education, concerning the reprint of the speech, which appeared in the Record Herald, cited in a broad sense in the above mentioned number of Onzetoekomst.

    The speech of Mr. Van der Ploeg brings out the following points: 1. That the Dutch in America are of a very poor origin. 2. That as a result of this they are backward and even unable to grasp the meaning of education. 3. That the establishment of Christian schools is the ultimate consequence of this.

    2

    4. That the Christian schools are entirely misplaced and unfit to make Citizens, fit for our American Nation. First we draw your attention to the fact that we champion the name Christian schools against, (as they were referred to by the speaker): Parochial and Private schools. Our Christian schools are not parochial nor private, they are rather the only institutions for elementary education, which can claim the title, Free Schools.

    The speaker stated that the Netherlanders who emigrated to America are of poor origin, that is largely true. It was not often that luxury brought them to America, that is certain, but nearly always betterment of their position, which made them take this long journey, for the rumors that came from here were always encouraging and continually tempted others to come to America. Wonderful opportunities were to be found in America,it would be foolish for any person to pass them up. Therefore it is improbable that their poor origin was the cause of being backward and unable to grasp the idea of higher education.

    3

    It is a known fact, that once established in this country, seeing that the manacles of poverty had fallen off their hands, they advanced far beyond those of other nationalities. Or do you think this is an exaggeration? Let us then turn to the facts.

    If it is reasonably correct that Chicago has a population of 2,000,000 people of which 20,000 are Hollanders, this would constitute 1% of Chicago's population. Now study the telephone directory, take carefully from it all the Dutch names, multiply them by 100, and you will find there would be need for a much larger directory than we have at present. Go still another step down the National ladder and compare their love for freedom. This battle for freedom was fought by the Dutch people as a whole, as well as by the individuals and this battle goes on unabated.

    Back in the sixteenth and seventeenth centurys, they fought for religious and political freedom, and from the Netherlands, the Reformation spreaded over Western Europe, its influence was felt far beyond.

    4

    It is that love of freedom, which has grown indestructible in the Dutch people. When through the French revolution, unnatural and unbearable bonds were made, then the freedom-loving people could not be held in check, and in 1834, at the separation of church and state, freedom of the church was anew acclaimed. Meanwhile something happened that can be called something new in history. Until now the battle was waged in spiritual, political and national terrain, but the task of making education free had just begun. Our youth was being considered. Elementary education had until now been more or less checked. At first it was Rome, and after the Reformation the Reformed church also took possession of education, and tried to use it to its own advantage. Then came the reaction, and the schools became state-property, and education was not free, except where the free school was established.

    In the Netherlands they are becoming increasingly popular and the public or state schools are gradually becoming the exception whether the free schools are Christian schools, makes no difference.

    5

    The other parties have the same opportunity, but on this point they seem more lax, for when it came to a fight for freedom. The free school is yet in its infancy, and if it is true, as is being claimed that this century is for the child, then you will realize that the child can no longer be tied by unnatural bonds, and they will give to him the freedom to which he can legally lay claim. This can only be accomplished in a free school, which is under the control of the parents. The child belongs to the parents. When a child is born it becomes a member of the family, and the parents have the right, and are responsible for the entire upbringing, and it is an abuse, when the state says to the parents: You are responsible for the entire bringing up of the child, except his education for which I am responsible because it can not be entrusted to you. But the parents who understand their full responsibility, will not turn them over to the state, but will undertake to educate their own children.

    This proves that Mr. Van der Ploeg was wrong when he declared that the champions of the free school, stood in the way of freedom and progress.

    6

    It is just against the enemies of the free school which we are protesting, they are too conservative, too backward on the problem of education to realize, (as the speaker said), the new order of things. I deem it improper to reply to the last point of the speaker, namely that the above mentioned schools are unfit to make good citizens for our American nation, for two reasons. The first because this case was made plain in Onzetoekomst of December 25, 1908. Second because, as Onzetoekomst rightfully pointed out that this teasing is too low, and the honor of the free school demands that we remain silent on that score. I wish to make only one more remark, namely, the entire of Mr. Vander Ploeg speaks of thoughtlessness and carelessness.

    The speaker is well known as a famous lawyer, and has the undivided trust of the entire Dutch element and his influence reaches to far beyond that. Correctness and completeness always earmark his work and it is continually to his honor to do everything complete. It remains a puzzle to the undersigned, how a man like Mr. Vander Ploeg, without studying the case in the least, could make a vicious attack on the Hollanders pet Jewel, as though it were only trash.

    7

    I also appreciate the value of the public schools but that is no reason why we should throw our ideals overboard. We trust that Mr. H. Vander Ploeg will confess that he missed the ball, and if such is not the case then he will reply to the above article.

    L. De Boer.

    In the Record Herald of December 9, 1908, there appears a reprint of the speech, delivered by Mr. H. Van der Ploeg, at the dinner of St. Nicholas Society, in ...

    Dutch
    I A 2 a, I A 1 a, I B 3 b, III B 2, II A 1, III A, III C, III G, III H, I C, IV