The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Onze Toekomst -- January 26, 1906
    The Chicago Division of the "A. N. V."("General Dutch League")

    The Chicago Division of the "General Dutch League," held its annual general meeting, last Wednesday, as advertised. The attendance was fairly good, although it could have been better. Even though the number of those attending was not large, their spirit for the worthy purpose of the League was much greater and each of those present showed by word and deed that they had resolved to work continuously to achieve that purpose. Two officers had to be chosen, a President and a Vice-President. For President H. Berends was re-elected and for Vice-President, the Rev. E. Breen, in place of H. U. Masman, the retiring member. The report of the Treasurer showed a net balance of $8 for the year. The report of the Secretary was very encouraging. From that we report the following: It is nearly two years since your reporter came from Michigan to Chicago. In Michigan he was a member of the Grand Rapids division, which formed a part of the "Western Branch D", of the "General Dutch League". When he arrived here, he found no division, and he felt as though he were missing something. Through correspondence with the Board of Directors he saw the possibility of organizing a independent division for Chicago. He spoke about that with some of his friends, with the result that on May 29th, a meeting was held for that purpose in Ruehl's Hall. On this first meeting, nineteen persons showed their readiness to become members of the new division. Although the necessary twenty members to form an independent 2division was not reached, there was no doubt that on a following meeting there would be more than enough. For this reason it was resolved to meet again in the near future. On June 8th we met again, this time in the hall at 535 Blue Island Ave. Three new members joined and so our membership rose to twenty-two, and our infant was born on June 8th, 1905. A Constitution and by-laws were made up, and the name, "Division Chicago of the General Dutch League" accepted. It was decided to hold another meeting as soon as possible and this took place on June 21st. On the occasion of this meeting we gained another new member, and a permanent Board was chosen consisting of the following gentlemen: Berends, Masman, Jacobsma, De - Boer and Holstein. Since that time, proceedings have gone on in the regular way. The Board has met seven times. On August 31st, (Queens Day), a general meeting was held in which all could participate. This meeting was well attended and could be called very successful. In the press, the Board defended the language and the honor of our Nation, as, among others, in a Dutch paper, that had the temerity to say that "the Dutch language was a luxury," in the Chicago Daily News, which declared that The Hague was the capitol of the Netherlands. Regular correspondence was had with the central Board of Directors. It recognized us as an independent self-supporting division and served us by giving help and advice. so for my report. Let us prepare, with the greatest of effort, to carry on as good citizens of the United States, those ideals, the American life by which our nation is known. And this we cannot do except by working in unison, strong efforts, 3and true perseverence. When we do this, we can extort respect from our fellow -citizens, and they will also recognize us as a nation, and why not? Our past is glorious, but our present, also is not to be overlooked. To mention only a few things for instance: Our artists Mesdag, Bosman, Israels. Are they not famous? And are not our Dutch engineers being given preference in foreign countries? For example: De Ryke, in China. and what is the reason that we should not be able to do something here? Why is there no course at the Chicago University in Dutch history and literature? Why could not a Dutch Chamber of Commerce flourish here as well as elsewhere? Why... but I end with the wish that we all have the feeling that we can amount to something here, if we insist. The "Division" now has a total membership of thirty. The number should be three hundred. Apply for membership to the Secretary, H. Jacobsma, 620 W. 14th Place - Chicago.

    The Chicago Division of the "General Dutch League," held its annual general meeting, last Wednesday, as advertised. The attendance was fairly good, although it could have been better. Even though ...

    Dutch
    III B 4, I C
  • Onze Toekomst -- September 21, 1906
    A New Sick Benefit for Belgians and Hollanders.

    On the 25th of August, a new sick-benefit fund was established in Chicago, to which belong mostly Belgians, but to which all who speak Dutch or Flemish are being invited. This fund has for its purpose, not only that of supporting its members in case of sickness, but also in cases of unemployment and especially to lend a helping hand to new immigrants who have just recently arrived here. The president is Albert van den Driessche.

    The next open meeting will be held on Sunday October 14, in the hall of Jan Bogers, 116 Hastings Street.

    On the 25th of August, a new sick-benefit fund was established in Chicago, to which belong mostly Belgians, but to which all who speak Dutch or Flemish are being invited. ...

    Dutch
    II D 1, I C, III G
  • Onze Toekomst -- August 16, 1907
    Remarks

    Cora L. V. Richmond, who visited the Peace Conference in the Hague, says in the Progressive Thinker, that the Dutch language is a mixture of German, Norwegian, and Swedish.

    Cora is very progressive in her knowledge of languages. It surprises us that she does not sympathize with the Germans, Norwegians, and the Swedish for the manner in which the Hollanders mutilate their language.

    Cora L. V. Richmond, who visited the Peace Conference in the Hague, says in the Progressive Thinker, that the Dutch language is a mixture of German, Norwegian, and Swedish. Cora ...

    Dutch
    I C
  • Onze Toekomst -- September 06, 1907
    Suffrage and Citizenship

    John R. Dos Passos of New York, thinks that suffrage has to be separated from citizenship. Strangers must be naturalized without giving them the right to vote, or other words, he only likes to give suffrage to strangers, who by the time of their arrival in America, have full command of the English language.

    In this manner only people who are born in America, and immigrants from Great-Britain and its colonies would be able to get the right to vote. All the others, also people like Mr. Nelson Morris, now deceased, and other prominent manufacturers, could become citizens, pay taxes, and assist the welfare of this country, but they could not secure the voting franchise.

    If this would pass, the seat of government should properly be in London, with a branch-office at Newport.

    John R. Dos Passos of New York, thinks that suffrage has to be separated from citizenship. Strangers must be naturalized without giving them the right to vote, or other words, ...

    Dutch
    III G, I C
  • Onze Toekomst -- December 13, 1907
    A Chair for the Dutch Language, Literature and History at Our University

    It is well known that the Chicago Section of the General Netherlands' League is trying to obtain a Chair in the Dutch Language, History, and Literature at the University of Chicago, and a prediction has been made in reference to it. The Chicago Section received from the Board of Directors at Dordrecht, Netherlands, the following letter:

    To The Board of Directors of the Chicago Section!

    Gentlemen;

    In answer to your letter of September 14, at our Board of Directors meeting of October 23, we decided to inform you, that it is with the greatest of pleasure, we have taken cognizance of your efforts, to establish a Chair for the Dutch Language, Literature and History in the University of Chicago. We hope you succeed.

    2

    The first movement shall be of very great importance. If a Dutch teacher is appointed at one of the American Universities, then, through the great competition among the Universities, the others will follow. And as one nation has the right to show its civilization and principles in your country, then, it is by all means "The Netherlands".

    With interest we are following your activities in this affair, and at all times we will be glad to hear the progress made in this matter.

    Very truly yours.

    By The Board of Directors,

    H. Kiewiet de Tonge, President;

    W. Dicke, Secretary.

    3

    A short contents of the petition which the Section of Chicago has brought into circulation to be signed is of the following effect:

    To The Trustees of the University-Senate of Chicago;

    Chicago, Illinois.,

    Gentlemen;

    We, the undersigned, of Dutch origin, and who are in sympathy with the purpose of making the people of America acquainted with the Dutch history, literature and language, humbly request, the eraction of a Chair for the study of Dutch history, literature and language, at the University of Chicago, this Chair also comprising the now existing sub-division of Netherlands' Art, in the Division of Art, at the University.

    We are requesting this of you, in earnest, for the sake of the great value of Dutch history itself.

    4

    The peculiar and intimate relations "The Netherlands" have had and still have with the United States, in the colonizing of the Dutch, in several Eastern States, and immigration of a later date, encouraged public interest in the Dutch art and literature, by every nationality.

    Furthermore we point out such need of a Chair, because Chicago, and its celebrated Universities are situated in the center of three quarters of the present Dutch immigrants, of the United States, and also because the University of Chicago has several individuals of Dutch origin as students. Already a division of Netherlands' art is established. This fact shows undisputably, this University to be, the center of Dutch civilization and influence in the United States.

    Hereby we assure the University of Chicago with all our hearts, moral support and if possible financial help in case a Chair as above described, should be erected at the University.

    It is well known that the Chicago Section of the General Netherlands' League is trying to obtain a Chair in the Dutch Language, History, and Literature at the University of ...

    Dutch
    I A 1 b, III B 2, III H, I C, I J
  • Onze Toekomst -- September 04, 1908
    General News

    Through the Chicago-Section of the General Netherland's League the petition for a Chair in the Dutch language, history and literature, at the Chicago University, shall be handed to the Board on the 15th of September.

    The petition contains almost 1000 signatures of prominent Dutchmen from nearly all States of the Union.

    Through the Chicago-Section of the General Netherland's League the petition for a Chair in the Dutch language, history and literature, at the Chicago University, shall be handed to the Board ...

    Dutch
    I A 1 b, III B 2, I C
  • Onze Toekomst -- November 20, 1908
    A Chair in the Dutch Language at the University

    Tuesday, November 17, the committee appointed by the Chicago Section of the General Netherland's League handed over the petition for a chair in Dutch language, history, and literature to the directors of the University of Chicago. As was mentioned before, the directors were already in possession of the petition, but without the signatures. Those signatures were handed over by the president of the committee, Mr. A. Vosterheerdt, with an appropriate speech, to the board of directors of the university.

    Because of a series of unfortunate circumstances, many members of the committee could not be present. Mr. Jacobsma was absent because of illness, Mr. Vennema was in Washington, Professor Nollen had to give a lecture, and Consul Birkhoff likewise could not come.

    The directors, however, were very much pleased with the petition, and assured the committee that financial difficulties were the only obstacle hindering the establishment of the requested chair.

    Tuesday, November 17, the committee appointed by the Chicago Section of the General Netherland's League handed over the petition for a chair in Dutch language, history, and literature to the ...

    Dutch
    I A 1 b, III B 2, I C
  • Onze Toekomst -- December 25, 1908
    Mr. Van Der Ploeg's Speech on the Festival of St. Nicholas

    At the St. Nicholas dinner, held December 8 at the Bismarck Hotel, Mr. H. Van der Ploeg made a speech which must have made many of the Dutch people present very angry. We had hoped that one of them would protest against the statements of the speaker; full details of his speech were printed the next day in the American newspapers. But it was undoubtedly below people's dignity to answer such foul imputations in which the character of our Dutch nation was attacked.

    The speaker's deep-rooted antipathy to--we should say inveterate hatred of--parochial elementary schools, made him burst out in invective against everything Dutch, and everything precious to them. It is entirely superfluous to defend parochial instruction against such crude attacks. Parochial instruction itself, and the fruits which it yields, here as well as in the Netherlands, are above all such criticism. In the Netherlands, people have given up that type of criticism for some time past; here, where this instruction is of 2relatively recent date, as is everything else in this country, people dare to place it in a wrong light. It is principally for that reason that a word of protest is not altogether superfluous. This is what the speaker had to say:

    "Coming as these people (the Dutch immigrants) do from different parts of Holland, and chiefly from small villages and country districts, where wages are low and the necessities of life dear, they arrive here with very fixed notions and prejudices, which are often the result of their birth and environment instead of a sound education and wise judgment.....I am afraid that the majority of them are also opposed to the study and adoption of what is best in American life and manners. They seem to have such fixed notions and habits that it is difficult for them to realize the new order of things. They wish to continue to measure and to judge things by the standard of the home they have left, and not of the home they find.

    "So extreme is this obstinate adherence to Dutch customs and usages, that our worthy Holland people establish Dutch parochial schools in many places, and 3would, if they could, establish exclusive small Dutch villages or settlements, even in our large cosmopolitan cities. It is usually only the poorer people who send their children to these schools, and so, besides paying their share of the taxes for the maintenance of our splendid public schools, they are also burdened with the support of these little private schools, which are usually poorly equipped. It is seldom that a school of this character has a competent teacher. As a rule he is not proficient in either English or Dutch, and seldom indeed in both.....The result is that the child must unlearn in later years what he should have learned correctly and well in his childhood, and is at a disadvantage for years to come, because of the time thus foolishly spent."

    And so the speaker continues to heap nonsense upon nonsense. The last sentence, with which the speaker concluded his demonstration, is especially curious, and indicates how thoroughly he "understands" his subject. Indeed, how can a person, at an elderly age, forget that which he should have learned as a child, and thus, which he has never learned? A more impossible conclusion cannot be imagined.

    4

    His whole reasoning indicates that the speaker is completely uninformed on the subject of parochial instruction; otherwise he would have acknowledged the fact that the teachers in our parochial schools have grown old in the service; that our parochial schools, no matter how recently they may have been built, are turning out young men and women, who have been prepared for life; who are second to none of the children of the public schools. The speaker should have mentioned the fact that heretofore the parochial schools, due to lack of sufficient forces, offered instruction only as far as the seventh grade. Therefore, the Dutch students had to continue in public schools, and in competitive examinations carried off prizes, proving that they did not need to forget that which they had never learned. Then he ought to know that generally the teachers in our parochial schools are well matched (in both English and Dutch, if you please) with the teachers in our public schools, whose teaching, even for the greatest advocates of our public schools, is pronounced to be, to put it mildly, "inadequate"; and he ought to know that teachers in parochial schools are accepted without teachers' certificatesby necessity, and last but not least, that the teaching personnel of our parochial schools teach from principle and conviction, and therefore are inspired with an enthusiasm for the work which 5cannot be found in the public schools. Then he should know that the renascent Netherlands has to thank the parochial school for its development, and that men like Kuyper and Bavinck, who have even come to America to explain the development of the reform movement, belonged to the first advocates of national parochial instruction.

    As we mentioned at the beginning, the parochial school does not need to be defended against such foul imputations. But we wish to emphasize particularly the fact that the future of America depends on its continuing to permit national parochial instruction of the youth of our people. If you take away the Bible and the doctrine of salvation from our children, your penal colonies and prisons will be enlarged.

    Let our people cling a little more closely to the old Dutch principles. It will not do them any harm. Our Dutch people here in America are not surpassed by any group in the sphere of knowledge and science, or commerce and industry. Only--and is this an offense?--our Dutch people do lag behind so far as the 6number of criminals and drunkards are concerned. Of more than 20,000 native-born Dutch living in Chicago, not more than ten ever come in contact with the police. These are our Dutch people, who lag behind and stand in the way of other people, Mr. Van der Ploeg. Beat that record, if you can!

    But it is not our desire to discuss this nonsense any further. It is really not our business, because, according to Mr. Van der Ploeg, the ministers, alone, are basically to blame, and we do not have any claim to that title.

    Furthermore, the speaker says: "In many of the small Holland settlements in Illinois and elsewhere, that I have observed, there is a lack of public spirit and enterprise which should be foreign to people of our nationality. And I am not afraid to say, for nothing personal is intended, that this spirit of self-sufficiency and smugness is often due in no small part to their leaders, and especially their ministers, to whom they look for guidance and of whom they expect so much."

    That closes the door for further dispute!

    At the St. Nicholas dinner, held December 8 at the Bismarck Hotel, Mr. H. Van der Ploeg made a speech which must have made many of the Dutch people present ...

    Dutch
    I A 2 a, I A 1 a, I A 1 c, III B 2, II E 2, III A, III C, IV, I C
  • Onze Toekomst -- January 08, 1909
    Mr. H. Vander Ploeg's St. Nicholas Speech (Editorial)

    In the Record Herald of December 9, 1908, there appears a reprint of the speech, delivered by Mr. H. Van der Ploeg, at the dinner of St. Nicholas Society, in which the Hollanders in America, especially if they are supporters of Christian education, are being put on trial in such a way, that cannot pass unnoticed.

    To my great pleasure, I noticed that Onzetoekomst already reflected on it, in its issue of December 25, in which unreservedly takes up the challenge for Christian education, concerning the reprint of the speech, which appeared in the Record Herald, cited in a broad sense in the above mentioned number of Onzetoekomst.

    The speech of Mr. Van der Ploeg brings out the following points: 1. That the Dutch in America are of a very poor origin. 2. That as a result of this they are backward and even unable to grasp the meaning of education. 3. That the establishment of Christian schools is the ultimate consequence of this.

    2

    4. That the Christian schools are entirely misplaced and unfit to make Citizens, fit for our American Nation. First we draw your attention to the fact that we champion the name Christian schools against, (as they were referred to by the speaker): Parochial and Private schools. Our Christian schools are not parochial nor private, they are rather the only institutions for elementary education, which can claim the title, Free Schools.

    The speaker stated that the Netherlanders who emigrated to America are of poor origin, that is largely true. It was not often that luxury brought them to America, that is certain, but nearly always betterment of their position, which made them take this long journey, for the rumors that came from here were always encouraging and continually tempted others to come to America. Wonderful opportunities were to be found in America,it would be foolish for any person to pass them up. Therefore it is improbable that their poor origin was the cause of being backward and unable to grasp the idea of higher education.

    3

    It is a known fact, that once established in this country, seeing that the manacles of poverty had fallen off their hands, they advanced far beyond those of other nationalities. Or do you think this is an exaggeration? Let us then turn to the facts.

    If it is reasonably correct that Chicago has a population of 2,000,000 people of which 20,000 are Hollanders, this would constitute 1% of Chicago's population. Now study the telephone directory, take carefully from it all the Dutch names, multiply them by 100, and you will find there would be need for a much larger directory than we have at present. Go still another step down the National ladder and compare their love for freedom. This battle for freedom was fought by the Dutch people as a whole, as well as by the individuals and this battle goes on unabated.

    Back in the sixteenth and seventeenth centurys, they fought for religious and political freedom, and from the Netherlands, the Reformation spreaded over Western Europe, its influence was felt far beyond.

    4

    It is that love of freedom, which has grown indestructible in the Dutch people. When through the French revolution, unnatural and unbearable bonds were made, then the freedom-loving people could not be held in check, and in 1834, at the separation of church and state, freedom of the church was anew acclaimed. Meanwhile something happened that can be called something new in history. Until now the battle was waged in spiritual, political and national terrain, but the task of making education free had just begun. Our youth was being considered. Elementary education had until now been more or less checked. At first it was Rome, and after the Reformation the Reformed church also took possession of education, and tried to use it to its own advantage. Then came the reaction, and the schools became state-property, and education was not free, except where the free school was established.

    In the Netherlands they are becoming increasingly popular and the public or state schools are gradually becoming the exception whether the free schools are Christian schools, makes no difference.

    5

    The other parties have the same opportunity, but on this point they seem more lax, for when it came to a fight for freedom. The free school is yet in its infancy, and if it is true, as is being claimed that this century is for the child, then you will realize that the child can no longer be tied by unnatural bonds, and they will give to him the freedom to which he can legally lay claim. This can only be accomplished in a free school, which is under the control of the parents. The child belongs to the parents. When a child is born it becomes a member of the family, and the parents have the right, and are responsible for the entire upbringing, and it is an abuse, when the state says to the parents: You are responsible for the entire bringing up of the child, except his education for which I am responsible because it can not be entrusted to you. But the parents who understand their full responsibility, will not turn them over to the state, but will undertake to educate their own children.

    This proves that Mr. Van der Ploeg was wrong when he declared that the champions of the free school, stood in the way of freedom and progress.

    6

    It is just against the enemies of the free school which we are protesting, they are too conservative, too backward on the problem of education to realize, (as the speaker said), the new order of things. I deem it improper to reply to the last point of the speaker, namely that the above mentioned schools are unfit to make good citizens for our American nation, for two reasons. The first because this case was made plain in Onzetoekomst of December 25, 1908. Second because, as Onzetoekomst rightfully pointed out that this teasing is too low, and the honor of the free school demands that we remain silent on that score. I wish to make only one more remark, namely, the entire of Mr. Vander Ploeg speaks of thoughtlessness and carelessness.

    The speaker is well known as a famous lawyer, and has the undivided trust of the entire Dutch element and his influence reaches to far beyond that. Correctness and completeness always earmark his work and it is continually to his honor to do everything complete. It remains a puzzle to the undersigned, how a man like Mr. Vander Ploeg, without studying the case in the least, could make a vicious attack on the Hollanders pet Jewel, as though it were only trash.

    7

    I also appreciate the value of the public schools but that is no reason why we should throw our ideals overboard. We trust that Mr. H. Vander Ploeg will confess that he missed the ball, and if such is not the case then he will reply to the above article.

    L. De Boer.

    In the Record Herald of December 9, 1908, there appears a reprint of the speech, delivered by Mr. H. Van der Ploeg, at the dinner of St. Nicholas Society, in ...

    Dutch
    I A 2 a, I A 1 a, I B 3 b, III B 2, II A 1, III A, III C, III G, III H, I C, IV
  • Onze Toekomst -- June 25, 1909
    [Preserve the National Tongue]

    A good example for the Hollanders was set by the French population of this city, last week. At a large meeting in which Mr. Elievezina was the principal speaker, it was strongly urged to speak the French language as much as possible. A- right it was pointed out, that to hold to the National character, it is in the first place necessary to keep up the mother-tongue, and that the best citizens of America are those who not only honor their fatherland, but also their mother-tongue.

    Every Frenchman in America should become an American citizen and learn the English language, said the speaker, but let them at the same time safeguard their nationality and practice the French language, the traditional language of our fore-fathers.

    A good example for the Hollanders was set by the French population of this city, last week. At a large meeting in which Mr. Elievezina was the principal speaker, it ...

    Dutch
    I A 1 b, I C