The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Hejmdal -- July 17, 1875
    [Progressive School]

    Miss Olivia Olson called a meeting last Friday at the Workingmen's Hall in regard to the question of opening Scandinavian schools, or at least one school for the progressive youth. The meeting was not as well attended as it should have been. Every one seemed to be interested and promised their support to Miss Olivia Olson. The school should be free so as to help keep the young people off the streets. They must be taught things not taught in the public schools. How to get the money to rent rooms, and pay for the gas and heat, will be taken up at the next meeting. Teachers can be secured gratis. They were sure teachers would be glad to donate a few hours a week to a project of this type.

    Miss Olivia Olson called a meeting last Friday at the Workingmen's Hall in regard to the question of opening Scandinavian schools, or at least one school for the progressive youth. ...

    Danish
    I A 2 a
  • Revyen -- April 30, 1898
    [Danish Folk Society]

    "Dansk Folkesamfund" here in Chicago invites all to a mass meeting May 1st in the school of the Trinity Church on the corner of Bickerdike and Superior Streets. The aim of the meeting is to further the cause of the Danish school for children, and to discuss the starting of a Danish people's high school in this town, to which a trade-training school is to be connected.

    "Dansk Folkesamfund" here in Chicago invites all to a mass meeting May 1st in the school of the Trinity Church on the corner of Bickerdike and Superior Streets. The aim ...

    Danish
    I A 2 a
  • Revyen -- August 25, 1906
    [Danish Day-School]

    Rev. H. C. Rordam of the Lutheran Trinity Church writes about the Danish Day-School in connection with the Danish Children's Home. This school is a open to all Danish children over 10 years of age. The subjects are religious instruction and Danish. But starting this year the school will also be open to small children from 5-9 years of age.

    Rev. H. C. Rordam of the Lutheran Trinity Church writes about the Danish Day-School in connection with the Danish Children's Home. This school is a open to all Danish children ...

    Danish
    II D 4, I A 2 a, I A 2 b
  • Revyen -- August 25, 1906
    [Danish Day-School]

    Rev. H. C. Rordam of the Lutheran Trinity Church writes about the Danish Day-School in connection with the Danish Children's Home. This school is a open to all Danish children over 10 years of age. The subjects are religious instruction and Danish. But starting this year the school will also be open to small children from 5-9 years of age.

    Rev. H. C. Rordam of the Lutheran Trinity Church writes about the Danish Day-School in connection with the Danish Children's Home. This school is a open to all Danish children ...

    Danish
    II D 4, I A 2 a, I A 2 b
  • Revyen -- October 26, 1907
    [Danish Teachers Would Like to Visit America] (Editorial)

    Teachers in Denmark inquired whether they would be given an opportunity to earn the money necessary for a trip to America, by working temporarily among the Scandinavians over here. The idea may seem appealing; it is, nevertheless, hardly practical for one thing, the Scandinavians of America keep themselves segregated along national lines. Each national group maintains its own schools, often in conjunction with the churches, and as a rule, have very limited funds. There are, moreover, plenty of teachers available at anytime the private schools are able to provide the funds with which to pay their salaries. Scandinavian grammar schools in this country will never be anything but an appendix to the American school system. So far as the adults are concerned, they have, at least in the cities, excellent opportunities to learn the English language and add to their knowledge by attending evening courses offered by the Public Schools, they seem to favor this method of learning.

    2

    No doubt a trip to America would be beneficial to many schoolmasters of the old country; but why not let the Danish Government make an annual appropriation for the purpose of financing these trips to America for a few teachers each year? In the final analysis, it is the state that will benefit by such educational travels. Students of industry and trade receive scholarships for such journeys every year, not to speak of writers, artists and scientists. Why are not the teachers, whose works of educating the young generation is just as important, given the same privileges? A state, that can afford to spend 25,000,000 Kroner for military purposes every year, should be able to spare a few thousand Kroner for such educational purposes as the training of its teachers. Or is the military extravagance perhaps the reason for strict economy when cultural values are at stake? If it is, the teachers of Denmark are not without means with which to change the situation, which is a deplorable one, to say the least.

    Teachers in Denmark inquired whether they would be given an opportunity to earn the money necessary for a trip to America, by working temporarily among the Scandinavians over here. The ...

    Danish
    III H, I A 1 a, I A 2 a, I A 3, III A, III C, I G
  • Dansk Tidende og Revyen -- May 22, 1925
    Pastor A. T. Dorf and the School in Des Moines

    Pastor A.T.Dorf has just returned from a trip to the Danish Church and School at Des Moines, Iowa , where he was Censor at the theological examination.

    With the annual meeting close at hand we pay Pastor Dorf a visit in his beautiful and hospitable home, and are invited into his magnificient library, where thousands of books are arranged as only an expert would want it done.

    Upon asking the Pastor if he had a pleasant trip, we received the answer. "To visit the Danish Church and School is not a very pleasant undertaking. It should be the uniting factor in our church work, but sorry to say, it has for many years been the cause of division and a storm center. In reality we are no further today in our school-work, than we were twenty-five years ago, and without a policy or plans."

    2

    "Was an examination held this year?" we ask, as we have heard that some of the young people refused to take the examination.

    "Yes, four students took the very simple examination, which was held, as much for the sake of society as for the students. The question of who shall pass, must not be decided by the principal alone. When we object to the abolishing of this examination, it is primarely to protect the theological students liberty."

    "Where will the annual meeting be held?"

    "In Omaha, Nebraska. The last annual meetings have not been peaceful. A few of the delegates have been aroused over something and have at once made it a cabinet-question."

    Homelands are brewing also for this years meeting. The principal of the school, Pastor Hoijberg, and Pastor V.S.Jensen, the theological professor of the school has been asked to resign. The annual meeting will be then decided upon their 3successors. Everything possible will be made to have Pastor Hoibjerg reappointed. While he is in possession of considerable executive ability, he has difficulty in co-operating with others, which has caused split in the ranks."

    "Did you give a lecture, while you were away?"

    "Yes, I gave a lecture on the history and development of the Free Church of America. I knew that within the Protestant Church a movement was about to try to unite the different denominations into one church on the lines of a Peoples Church of a Community Church. An other idea is to introduce religious teaching with the Public Schools. It is a pity to know, that in Chicago 4/5 of the children grow up entirely devoid of any moral or religious ideas or teachings, consequently 85% of our criminals are young people."

    I spoke particularly on the Gary-System of Schools. Lastly I spoke on the ever increasing demand for Ministers and a university education. What our church needs today is leaders of more than average ability. I touched upon the question for 4the reason, that Pastor Hoibjerg and his group were opposed to this idea in preference to the free education of ministers at our theological schools."

    "What do you expect to be the outcome of the annual meeting?"

    "That question is rather difficult to answer. So much depends on circumstances. The church managament has not formulated any plans. When we view the conditions at the school, one is inclined to consider the battle lost, with no time to win another."

    Paster Dorf, who is of the rather optimistic kind, sinks into worried silence and melancholically shakes his head when we ask him, if he is going to the annual meeting.

    Pastor A.T.Dorf has just returned from a trip to the Danish Church and School at Des Moines, Iowa , where he was Censor at the theological examination. With the annual ...

    Danish
    III C, I A 1 a, I A 2 a, IV
  • Dansk Tidende -- August 28, 1925
    Danish Church Organizations

    Danish emigrants arriving here fifty years ago very quickly felt the lack of churches. At home the church was an institution, a part of the landscape. It had been there always and had been the old folks' spiritual refuge as far back as one could remember.

    Emigrants of half a century ago preserved closer ties with their native land than do emigrants nowadays. Modern people are more or less cosmopolitan in their behavior, which by most of them is considered an advantage. That may be a matter of doubt, however. We have too many "jacks of all trades but masters of none". Before very long these emigrants of early days began to resume their traditional religious activity. To begin with, they received aid from home, but soon they were able to hold their own and even to accumulate a surplus with which to help others.

    It is often difficult for people accustomed to look at the church as a state 2institution to feel at home as members of a privately owned church. At home the church was maintained, and the minister's salary paid in good times or bad, while over here good or bad times are reflected very clearly on the church.

    In spite of the fact that only a minority of Danish emigrants have been actively interested in church work the results obtained are by no means negligible. Moreover, most of the churches have been built while the builders themselves were hard at work establishing their own homes and positions in life.

    Of course there are Danes who are members of churches of other denominations than the Lutheran, and a great many particularly in the cities, have joined American churches. Some belong to Norwegian churches. However, the majority of Danes interested in religious activity belong to the Lutheran organizations, of which there are two, namely, "The Danish Church" and "The United Church".

    The Danish Church has a combined staff of fifty-eight ministers. During recent 3years several ministers have left for Denmark. There was a shortage of ministers at home, and over here quite a few difficulties arose on account of the use of two languages.

    At present there are thirty-seven ministers in Denmark who once served in the Danish Church in the United States. Most of them are candidates in theology from the University of Copenhagen who accepted positions with the Danish Church in the United States for longer or shorter periods without the intention of emigrating. The Danish Church consists of ninety-eight community churches spread from coast to coast. The total value of church property is $831,334.

    The total membership is hard to determine because in some cases the memberships are held by single persons and in others by families numbering two or more. We calculate that there are 6,315 paid-up memberships, but there are actually about 20,000 people who belong to the Church. In addition to active members and their families there are those who attend church services and make use of the spiritual conveniences only occasionally.

    4

    The Danish Church has always adhered to the open-door policy, and we doubt that there is any considerable number of Danes who have not at least once in their lives benefited directly by the presence of a Danish church.

    The Danes are somewhat shy in their religious affairs. We are far from being so aggressive as are the Americans. We let people come and go as they please because we do not believe in high pressure and persuasive methods. However, it would probably do no harm for the members to advertise the program a little more than they do.

    A lot of people outside the Church would like to become members if somebody would ask them, and no doubt they would get a lot of satisfaction out of being active in the good work.

    Young people's societies affiliated with the churches have a total approximately of 2,235 members. Churches affiliated with the Danish Church had a total 5expenditure of $151,227 last year, of which $22,213 went for operating expenses. Besides its church work the Danish Church operates a school in Des Moines, Iowa, an Old People's Home, and several Children's Homes.

    The United Church is a younger organization with a total membership of 27,715. The total property value is $1,770,950. Its staff of ministers, missionaries, and professors numbers 132, thus outnumbering the 58 ministers of the Danish Church to quite an extent. Sixteen ministers who previously served in the United Church are now in Denmark. The total income of the United Church was $117,771 last year. Of this amount $70,732 went for operating expenses. Local expenses such as ministers' salaries, maintenance, and alterations, were $225,000. The United Church maintains a school in Blair, Nebraska, and several Old People's Homes and Children's Homes. The Danish Church pays the salary of a missionary in Santalistan, and the United Church has missionaries in Japan, among the Mormons, and among the Indians.

    6

    These figures may serve as information about the activity of [the two] Danish churches in the United States. There are no other Danish organizations in this country comparable to these in extent of membership and in activity, and the blessings brought about by this work should not be measured in figures either.

    A. Th. Dorf

    Danish emigrants arriving here fifty years ago very quickly felt the lack of churches. At home the church was an institution, a part of the landscape. It had been there ...

    Danish
    III C, I A 2 a, II D 4, II D 5, III A, III H, I C, IV
  • [Interview] -- [Unknown date]
    Interview with Rev. C. M. Videbeck

    The Ebenezer Danish Church has for many years conducted a daily vacation Bible school. The enrollment last year (1936) was 87. The school is held, every day for the four weeks, immediately following the close of the public schools. The children from the ages of five to fourteen years, are assembled in the church parlors from nine to twelve o'clock every morning for instruction in Bible stories, singing, hand work, making of picture books, soap-carving and drawing.

    The Ebenezer Danish Church has for many years conducted a daily vacation Bible school. The enrollment last year (1936) was 87. The school is held, every day for the four ...

    Danish
    III C, I A 2 a
  • [Interview] -- [Unknown date]
    Interview with Rev. C. M. Videbeck

    The Danish language was for many years used exclusively in the Ebenezer Danish Church, but about 1910 the first English class was organized. Since then the English language has been used more and more and in the last two or three years, the Sunday School has had only one Danish class. The fact is that approximately 80% of the Sunday School pupils are from the community, which is not Scandinavian as was the case thirty or forty years ago.

    The present enrollment (1936) is of more than 200 children and young people, with 20 Sunday School teachers. Mr. Carl Nielsen has served in the Sunday School for 33 years; one of his former pupils is now a pastor, the Rev. Edwin Petrusson of Kankakee, Ill. Another pupil, Mr. Herman Sorensen is now preparing for missionary work in Sudan, Africa.

    At the annual Christmas festival of the Sunday school it is customary to take up a collection for the Indian Mission at Oaks, Oklahoma.

    The Danish language was for many years used exclusively in the Ebenezer Danish Church, but about 1910 the first English class was organized. Since then the English language has been ...

    Danish
    III C, I A 2 a