The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 02, 1892
    A Chinese Tea-House

    Hip Lung, the braided millionaire from South Clark Street, will erect a Tea-House on the Midway Promenade, and visited the Fair Grounds for that purpose yesterday.

    He was accompanied by Tho Sing from New York, Yuen Lai from Canton, and Chow Tai from Chicago. These gentlemen represent a very wealthy corporation.

    Hip Lung, the braided millionaire from South Clark Street, will erect a Tea-House on the Midway Promenade, and visited the Fair Grounds for that purpose yesterday. He was accompanied by ...

    Chinese
    II B 1 c 3, II A 2, III H, IV
  • Chinese Daily Times -- March 05, 1935
    Education in Home and School

    The power of a nation depends upon the qualification of its citizens; the qualification of a citizen depends upon the education of the individual; and education is indeed, the most influential factor in the existence of a nation.

    Education may well be divided into two distinctive classes, they are school education and home education. The latter is generally termed "home-training" and is fundamentally most important as it deals with the most plastic years of a human being. In fact, home-training is so important that it guides and sometimes determines our future. Upon the shoulders of our parents, then, rests the vital responsibility of home-training.

    Parents, who are ready to undertake the difficult task of raising children, should first of all, realize that their children are born innocent, and they must see to it that their innocence is not jeopardized by ignorance.

    2

    The innocent children are born with the instinct of imitation and learn through their senses of hearing and seeing. They know not right from wrong, nor wrong from right. Whatever they see, they do; whatever they hear, they say. It is, therefore, important that good parents watch their own conversation and actions. If the parents, unfortunately, should possess some undesirable habits, they should refrain from indulging in them in the presence of their alert children, because rarely do the children have habits which they have not acquired from their parents. Fortunate indeed are parents, to have the privilege to play such an important role in the life of the next generation! But how delicate, how important, and how difficult, is their task! Unfortunately because parents are unable to Perform such a task, we have our wide national illiteracy.

    Besides home-training then, is the equally important school education, We, undoubtedly, know that the responsibility rests with the teachers and instructors 3The teachers' responsibility should not be a mere scholastic achievenemt but should rather be the character formation of the students. We regret to admit again that the lack of a nation-wide educational system and the ignorance on the part of our teachers as to their real duty is the second of the two predominant factors in our national illiteracy.

    Our corruptive educational system of the Chin Dynasty need no further expression of opinions as we all are more or less acquainted with it. But the so-called modern educational system of today is what we are concerned with. It is a pity that a good percentage of our modern teachers have neglected their fundamental duty of character building. In fact, teachers who live the lives of play-boys have become numerous. And there are teachers who are so involved in politics that they can practically call their schools political centers. No doubt, these vices and hobbies are but personal characteristics, but they are of such an import to the future of the students that we who are interested in our children's welfare must take immediate action.

    4

    The responsibility of the parents in the homes and of the teachers in the schools is clear to us. No doubt, we are away from our homeland but if we perform our duties here in our Chicago Chinese community efficiently we shall soon find our children playing an important part in the development of our national life.

    Parents who are interested in our national welfare should pay immediate attention to the home-training of their children. And to the teachers may we suggest that they should refrain from political activities and be molders of character as well as teachers of learning. With the fullest cooperation of all concerned, we are sure, our country will soon be one of the strongest in the world.

    The power of a nation depends upon the qualification of its citizens; the qualification of a citizen depends upon the education of the individual; and education is indeed, the most ...

    Chinese
    I A 1 a, I B 3 b, III H
  • Chinese Daily Times -- March 08, 1935
    Essential Factors in the Nationalized Educational System

    Our ever-increasing associations with the foreign world are beginning to penetrate the foundation of our 6,000-year-old civilization, foreshadowing changes in the social and economic fabric, and in the traditional philosophy and ethical outlook of our people, of greater significance than the more dramatic changes in the political sphere.

    Our virtually unchangeable independent ideals have, at long last, come to submit and to react to extraneous influences. We are beginning to realize that the stability of our age-old civilization has left us trailing behind the comparatively new nations. We are convinced that a momentous transformation must take its course. But little are we aware of the fact that there are no other influences that have done and will do more to unify the people, reconcile diverse points of view, eliminate provincial or state jealousies, set ideals for the people, and train leaders for the service of the state and the nation, than nationalized education.

    2

    Indeed, modern industry and forms of government demand in the average citizen a higher standard of knowledge and training than formerly sufficed. Education aims at conserving and perfecting the life of the community, but that life is nothing other than the life of the individual. Education, then, is the determiner of a person's future.

    A school, the generally recognized center of education, when its functions are properly performed, is a genuine society inspired by the best ideals of national character and therefore able to transmit to and confirm in its pupils the traits which enter into those ideals ideals of the new and not of the old.

    Whether or not a school is capable of performing its functions properly depends entirely upon the structure and organization of a nationalized educational system, a system which provides for all citizens the acquisition of individual development through the so called "public school education," an organization which possesses its distinctive feature in the replacement of 3the old conception, - in which schools corresponded mainly to social stratification, - by the idea that children of all classes should have an equal opportunity at a primary education designed to meet the needs of childhood, followed by a post-primary or secondary education adjusted to the needs of adolescence. Thus a young man is at last equipped with the common knowledge of his social and economic responsibilities and activities in his immediate community.

    The so-called "public school education" has enabled the young man to weigh the difference between the primitive tendency of a community towards the complete subordination of an individual and the modern tendency towards the increasing valuation of individual life. Education, therefore, is indeed the stimulating factor in a child's - a youth's - a young man's ever-increasing realization of his individual valuation to his community, state and national government.

    It is obvious, then, that the individuals or citizens make a country; education 4makes an individual; and, therefore, education makes a country.

    It is no doubt easy to visualize and to realize the importance of education, primary, elementary, and public-to-a nation, but to establish and to perform a nationalized educational system is another question - it is difficult. I say it is difficult, especially in our country, because of its tremendously vast area, unstable political situation, inefficient transportation and communication, and lastly, lack of economic nationalism. But in view of these unquestionable obstacles our duty is to rouse the spirit of the people of the republic to perform the seemingly impossible in order to accomplish the indispensable.

    Surely, we can recall what Dr. Sun Yat-Sen did for our country. Yes, he performed what the people of prior to 1911 thought was impossible. But in October, 1911, the nation witnessed the miraculous change - from an Imperialistic government of four millenium to the present day Republican government. I say, therefore, if there is will there is power.

    5

    Knowing what is indispensable to our nation, let us all put forth the individual efforts in performing the impossible and the acquiring of the indispensable - the nationalization of educational system.

    My personal opinion is that an efficient nationalized educational system must embody the following factors:

    1. The organization of a board of education in town, city, county, state, and headed by the executive committee of the education department in the central government. Like a national government, the educational system must be efficiently organized and maintaining an absolute relationship between the sub-department and the central office.

    2. Any educational fundamentals, reports, changes and functions must be opinioned by the national experts and then sanctioned by the national executive committee of the central education department before they are to be nationalized.

    6

    3. Executive orders of the central office of the department of education must be strictly observed by the state, county, city and township boards. Any plans or schemes of specific changes and improvements of certain localities should be presented by the township board to its immediate superior who in turn will do likewise, which means, eventually, that the national executive committee of the educational department will directly supervise all changes and improvements in all localities - a system of efficient nationalization.

    4. The state should be responsible in developing the middle class talent, and the national central office should be responsible in the making of all talented research workers and specialists.

    5. All educational commissioners and staff members should be supported by the locality with the sanction of the national central office. In case of financial insufficiency or over-appropriation for such a program, the central office should see to the balance.

    7

    6. Elementary and middle school operations should be financed by the city and state, and the national central office should finance educational institutions beyond the middle school - such as colleges and technical institutions, etc.

    In case a city or a state is unable to raise sufficient funds for its own elementary and middle school expenditures, the central office will, naturally, supplement the balance.

    7. Experimentation in the field of educational functions is very essential. Each locality or township should be allowed the opportunity, without national interference, for educational experimentations which, of course, must not go beyond the central office educational fundamentals. This opportunity will naturally encourage unlimited progress and expansion in all localities.

    8. If a town or a city is unable to establish its elementary and middle school, or such operation may involve more than one town or city, then the 8state should take the full responsibility.

    If educational functions should involve more than one state, the operation automatically becomes a national central office problem.

    In other words, the national executive council of the educational central office should always be the basic foundation in all educational enterprises - giving, however, all chances possible to staff members of each locality through out the nation for a maximum exercise of initiative in supplying the exact need of their own locality.

    If we can consider thoroughly the above factors in the nationalization of our educational system, I am sure the result will not be far from what has been accomplished by this country.

    In promoting such a program may I say that we who are abroad, especially in this country, should assume the leadership. The reason is because we are 9living in a country with a perfect educational system, a country which has achieved more during the past century than any other nation in the world, due largely if not totally, to its efficient educational system. We who realize the important part education is playing in national standing, should, therefore, do our utmost in promoting and advancing the efficient nationalization of our educational system.

    Our ever-increasing associations with the foreign world are beginning to penetrate the foundation of our 6,000-year-old civilization, foreshadowing changes in the social and economic fabric, and in the traditional philosophy ...

    Chinese
    I A 1 a, III H, I E
  • Chinese Daily Times -- March 12, 1935
    A Farewell Banquet in Honor of Mr. Y. C. Li by the Nationalist Party

    The Chinese Nationalist Party of Chicago entertained Mr. Li at a banquet yesterday on the occasion of his departure for China.

    Mr. Li is a well known nationalist pioneer who has done much for the development of the Chicago Nationalist Party. His popularity in our Chinese community has been great because of his resourceful financial assistance to Chinese students who were in financial difficulties.

    All the leading Nationalist members, including the editor Mr. Jin Liang - Fu, were present at the banquet. Every speaker praised Mr. Li for his untiring patriotic activities, his generous assistance to the needy students and his devoted interest in the development of our Chinese community in Chicago.

    We understand that Mr. Li will leave for China by way of San Francisco.

    The Chinese Nationalist Party of Chicago entertained Mr. Li at a banquet yesterday on the occasion of his departure for China. Mr. Li is a well known nationalist pioneer who ...

    Chinese
    III H, I A 1 a, II D 10
  • Chinese Daily Times -- March 14, 1935
    T. T. Tsung and C.C. Li Will Leave Chicago for Detroit

    Mr. T. T. Tsung, president of the Kwangtung Radio Institute and Mr. C. C. Li, chairman of the radio and electrical division of the Nanking Communication Department, have come to this country from China to visit the principal industrial and electrical cities.

    They have been in Chicago over a week, and during this time Mr. Y. F. Moy has escorted our guests to the various electrical plants and factories. They feel that their stay in Chicago has not only been very entertaining but also helpful to them.

    They left Chicago yesterday for Detroit where they will visit Henry Ford's automobile plant. From there they will go the Eastern States and will return to China by the way of Europe.

    Mr. T. T. Tsung, president of the Kwangtung Radio Institute and Mr. C. C. Li, chairman of the radio and electrical division of the Nanking Communication Department, have come to ...

    Chinese
    III H
  • Chinese Daily Times -- March 14, 1935
    The Importance of the Educational Nationalization

    The problem of democracy is a problem of education. Experience has shown that true democracy and illiteracy do not go together. They are like ice and fire. True democracy must be built on intelligent citizenship, a thing not possible in our homeland where only twenty percent of the population can read and write. Since 1911 the thinking class, which embodies the twenty percent, has tried desperately to make the populace literate but has failed to achieve much. It is our conviction that the lot of the common people cannot be bettered until they are able to read and write. From the standpoint of national progress it is impossible to develop a country without the strength of an enlightened people, and the further enliightenment is spread in any land the greater is the progress of that people.

    2

    Unless we make the masses literate through a revolutionized educational system, our country will continue to be exploited by militarists from within and imperialists from without.

    The main factor responsible for the high percentage of illiteracy in our country has been, undoubtedly, the difficulty of learning the Chinese written language, which is altogether different from the spoken language. It has been taught for centuries as the only literary medium, though to attain a proficient knowledge of it would require almost a life time. The call for a reform of the written language is therefore of the utmost importance, if one fourth of the world's population is to be made safe for democracy and prove a blessing to mankind.

    3

    Fortunately a literary revolution took place in 1919, which was the simplification of the process of learning to read and write, providing the people with a more simplified tool for expression called "Pei-Hwa," which combines the written and spoken languages, and thus reducing the problem of illiteracy.

    One far reaching effect of the adoption of Pei-Hwa is the replacement of all old literary writings in the text books of elementary schools by writings in the conversational style. A national convention of the teachers from the government normal schools petitioned, a few years later, the teaching of Pei-Hwa in the elementary schools in place of the classical language. Accordingly, the following proclamation was issued:

    4

    "We have received from the convention of the National Educational Association their decision to promote a national language, in order that the spoken and written languages may become one. Moreover, they asked the Ministry of Education to take this matter into consideration and give effect to their decision. A further recommendation has been received by us from the Organizing Committee for the unification of the National Language, urging the consideration and prompt change of the present Classical Department to National Language Department etc.

    "We recognize that because of the difference between our classical and spoken languages, education in the schools makes slow progress and the keen edge of the spirit of union both between individuals and in society at large has thereby been blunted. Moreover, if we do not take prompt steps to make the spoken and written languages the same, any plans for developing our civilization will surely fail.

    5

    "This Ministry of Education has for several years made positive advances in promoting such a national language. All educators, moreover, throughout the country are in favor of a change, by which the teaching of the national spoken language shall take the place of the classical language. Inasmuch, therefore, as all desire to promote education in the national language, we deem it wise not to delay the matter any longer.

    "We, therefore, now order that beginning in the primary schools, all shall be taught the national spoken language rather than the national classical language. Thus the spoken and written languages will become one. This Ministry requests all officials to take notice and act accordingly, and requires all schools under their jurisdiction to respect this order and carry it into effect."

    6

    The above is an old order from our Ministry of Education but how many of us have responded to the order? No doubt, we are living here in an educationally systemized country where the need of hard - pressing educational revolution of our homeland is hardly felt directly, but we as citizens of China should realize that every one of us is responsible for our national progress, especially fundamental education.

    Our educational movement of today differs from the United States - in that the American Educational Movement is entirely a governmental affair whereas ours is a people's movement, though local officials do come in to assist. Lately the educational movement is even pushed in the army by men like Gen. Chiang Kai-Shek, etc. who have come to realize the importance of army education.

    7

    The result is immensely gratifying. Not only have many of the illiterate soldiers learned to read and write, but the morale in the army is also fostered. Yes indeed, better education makes a better citizen and a better citizen makes a better nation.

    The significance of the Mass Educational Movement was characterized by one of our foremost educators, Mr. James Yen, in the following statement: "Reading has been traditionally looked upon by the people as a specialty to be pursued exclusively by the scholar. There has been in reality what is called the'aristocracy of learning.' The Mass Educational Movement, in championing the cause of 'education for all,' and in working systematically and persistently to bring education within the reach of all, bids fair to revolutionize the thought life of the masses.

    8

    "It is a movement by the people. The promotion of the campaign and the teaching and supervision of the schools are done voluntarily by businessmen, gentry, teachers and students of the schools and colleges. The campaign fund is contributed by the well-to-do members of the community. One of the inevitable results is the boosting of education wherever it goes. On the one hand it arouses the public sentiment of the leaders for general educational reform, and on the other hand, it creates a desire on the part of rank and file for more adequate education.

    "The Mass Educational program provides favorable conditions for united effort where no material gain is possible and where unselfish service is demanded. Furthermore, by participating in this program the well-to-do and the educated come to the realization that the welfare of the community depends upon the development and the intelligence of the masses.

    9

    In the meantime, as the illiterate themselves are given the opportunity for self development, it creates in them a sense of personal worth as well as a sense of responsibility in the life of the community and the nation."

    How true it is, that the future of any national government is totally dependent upon the educational progress of the nation. While the need for constructive efforts is felt on all hands by our national government, the nationalization of education to curb illiteracy is by far the most urgent, and calls for the support of all of us who have the welfare of our fellow countrymen and national government at heart.

    Let us all begin right from where we are, in this little community, to promote more educational activities - not particularly for ourselves as most of us perhaps feel that we are beyond the learning age, but for the benefit of our children who will shoulder the heavy responsibility of our national future.

    The problem of democracy is a problem of education. Experience has shown that true democracy and illiteracy do not go together. They are like ice and fire. True democracy must ...

    Chinese
    III H, I A 1 b, I A 3
  • Chinese Daily Times -- March 30, 1935
    Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association

    In behalf of all fellow Chinese who are anxious to return to China but who have insufficient funds, the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association has, with the co-operation of our Consulate, made arrangements with shipping and railway companies so as to obtain a special reduced fare from Chicago to Hongkong, China. This special rate, however, is limited only to the people who prove themselves to be in need of assistance due to old age, illness, and unemployment, etc. We hope that all those who are planning on returning to China will come personally to make the proper arrangements.

    The Association, as a matter of fact, will even endeavor to help those financially destitute.

    2

    The following are the special fares designated by three different companies:

    1. Blue-Funnel Line - $57.25 (per person from Chicago to Hongkong)

    2. American Dollar Line - $79.10 (same as above)

    3. Canadian-Pacific Line - $79.10 (Same as above)

    In behalf of all fellow Chinese who are anxious to return to China but who have insufficient funds, the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association has, with the co-operation of our Consulate, ...

    Chinese
    III H, II D 10, III G, II D 1
  • Chinese Daily Times -- July 06, 1935
    Mr. N. P. Lin Entertained by the Nationalist Society

    Mr. N. P. Lin, the newly appointed Editor in Chief of the New York Chinese Daily News, stopped in Chicago on his way from Portland to New York City.

    The Vocal Nationalist Society was notified of his arrival by the Portland National Society the day before.

    Three fellow Nationalists- C. I. Kuong, S. Fong and H. F. Sheh were sent to welcome Mr. Lin at the station. Last night he was entertained at a banquet in the Great Eastern Restaurant. Nationalist members attending the banquet, were numerous.

    After being refreshed with wine, Chairman Mr. C. J. Kuong offered a toast of welcome and asked Mr. Lin to deliver a speech. Mr. Lin, then related briefly his experiences with and the progressive condition of, the Nationalist Society of China.

    2

    The speech was very touching and stimulating to the listeners.

    Mr. Lin left Chicago this noon.

    Mr. N. P. Lin, the newly appointed Editor in Chief of the New York Chinese Daily News, stopped in Chicago on his way from Portland to New York City. The ...

    Chinese
    III B 2, III H
  • Chinese Daily Times -- August 12, 1935
    Local Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association to Send Money for Chinese Flood Relief

    Mr. T. M. Wong made a motion of sending the local Chinese Boy Scout Reserve Balance of a few hundred dollars to the Chinese flood relief. The motion was met with unanimous approval by all.

    Mr. T. M. Wong made a motion of sending the local Chinese Boy Scout Reserve Balance of a few hundred dollars to the Chinese flood relief. The motion was met ...

    Chinese
    III H, II D 10, III B 2, III E
  • Chinese Daily Times -- August 17, 1935
    Chinese Flood Relief Solicitor Received Contributions from Out-Of-Town

    The over-flowing of Yantze and Yellow Rivers have caused disastrous floods in our country. Thousands upon thousands have lost their lives. And property damages were enormous. Never before was a flood condition as pitiful and sorrowful as this one.

    Our fellow countrymen, after learning the disastrous news, have been contributing very generously toward its relief.

    Local Chinese Consolidated Benovelent Associations flood relief solicitor Mr. H. L.Chen received a contribution of $2.00 today form Mr. T. C. Chen of Peru, Illinois. We can readily see that Mr. Chen embraces the principle of compassion and charity.

    The over-flowing of Yantze and Yellow Rivers have caused disastrous floods in our country. Thousands upon thousands have lost their lives. And property damages were enormous. Never before was a ...

    Chinese
    III H, II D 10, III B 2, II D 1