The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Chicago Tribune -- August 13, 1891
    Chinese May Visit the Fair

    What bearing the laws of the United States affecting Chinese immigrants will have upon citizens of China arriving in this country to visit the Chicago Exposition has been under consideration at the Treasury Department for several days. Acting Secretary Nettleton to-day addressed a communication on the subject to Vice-President Bryan, in which he stated the purpose of Congress in enacting laws prohibiting the immigration of Chinese laborers. This is well understood. It is difficult to see in what manner that purpose would be to any extent defeated or hindered by permitting Chinese citizens under proper regulations to visit the United States in 1893 for the purpose of taking part in the Columbian Exposition, in which the Chinese Government has been formerly asked by the Government of the United States to participate. If it shall prove that any difficulty or uncertainty would affect the intrusion or application of the law in this case, Congress will meanwhile be given an opportunity to take the question into consideration.

    What bearing the laws of the United States affecting Chinese immigrants will have upon citizens of China arriving in this country to visit the Chicago Exposition has been under consideration ...

    Chinese
    III G, II B 1 c 3
  • Chicago Tribune -- August 16, 1891
    From the Chinese Colony

    Chicagos Mongolians were in a state of great excitement yesterday. Hip Long, Sam Moy, and Chow Tal, the big three of the local Chinese colony, issued a proclamation to the effect that Lem, alias Harry Ant, a laundryman at Madison and Peoria Streets. has to be avoided by all good and true Chinamen until further notice. It is claimed that Lem furnished false information to Special Treasury Agent I. F. Scanlon which led to the arrest of seven Chicago Chinamen, who were returning from a visit to the fatherland.

    The seven had their papers, but the informant of Mr. Scanlon said they were not made out to the men who carried them. The unfortunate seven were held at Gretna Man, until yesterday, when it was ascertained the information against them was false. The triumvirate claim to have abundant proof that Lem Ant was the cause of all the trouble. "We will see him again" said Sam Moy last evening, and give him another chance to clear himself. If he fails to do so we will have nothing more to do with him.

    2

    We have sent word to all the Chinese in Chicago of what he has done. If he does not clear his skirts his fellow countrymen do not want to have anything whatever to do with him. We believe he did it hoping to get a reward from the government.

    Lem Ant is also accused of abandoning the worship of Tass for the Christian religion and conducting a Chinese Sunday-school in his laundry for some time.

    Chicagos Mongolians were in a state of great excitement yesterday. Hip Long, Sam Moy, and Chow Tal, the big three of the local Chinese colony, issued a proclamation to the ...

    Chinese
    III G
  • Chicago Tribune -- July 29, 1892
    Inspection of Returning Chinamen

    The Chinese colony in this city has received a knock-out blow in an effect to secure a ruling from Washington, in reference to the last exclusion act. Shortly after the passage of this law in May last, the Chinese proposed that vessels sailing from Canadian ports, with Chinese on board booked for Chicago, should be allowed to take their passengers through to this port where the latters right to enter the United States could be examined. It was a harmless booking proposition on its face, but the Government authorities at this port filed a prompt objection.

    The government sustained them, and orders were given that Chinese from Canada should be landed and inspected at the American port nearest to the point of sailing. "We didn't wish to avoid the work of inspection", said an official at the Custom House yesterday, "but we wanted Uncle Sam to have a fair show in the matter.

    2

    The Chinese colony here comprises between 2,500 and 3,000 persons. It has a certain amount of influence created by its trade connections, for the Chinese do a big business here and several Chinamen are wealthy men, even from a Caucasian's standpoint". They have lawyers employed and they have friends in two or three railroad companies and they have connections in other directions. I do not assert that they could bring forward all these people to help identify a Chinaman. There is less danger in that than the brotherhood which exists among themselves and their willingness to help each other.

    The law permits Chinese merchants, who have previously lived here to return. Now any Chinaman in the city where he lived can produce scores of his country-men to swear that he was engaged in business as a merchant. Under the Chinese custom every man in any of the large Chinese stores here is a merchant.

    3

    May be he swept the floor and did sink work. Still he was a merchant and can prove it by lots of sworn testimony. In places where the entering Chinaman hasn't resided, where he hasn't a host of intimate friends, manifestly the Government is better protected while the Chinaman's rights are just as well taken care of.

    The Exclusion Act, which went into effect in May, contains one provision with which the Treasury Department is apparently still wrestling. It relates to the methods which shall be used to identify Chinamen applying to enjoy the privileges of the Act. The department notified collectors and inspectors some weeks ago that instructions on the point would be issued shortly, but the orders have not yet been received. The extraordinary resemblance which the average Chinaman bears to dozens of other Chinamen always hampered the customs offices in carrying out the provisions of the former anti-Chinese law.

    4

    The photograph of the owner is affixed to the papers carried by a Chinaman. "But it looks like twenty others", said an inspector yesterday. A photograph is by no means a sufficient identification, especially when it is remembered that a keen intelligent race is concerned. The Chinese are determined to enter this country. It is a Herculean task to keep them out.

    It is understood that the Bertillon system of identification has been pressed upon the notice of the Treasury Department. The government authorities here for the reasons mentioned expect few Chinese inspection cases. But they are interested in the subject of identification. Yesterday a man who has traveled in the East said: "Why doesn't the government require each Chinaman to make the imprint of his thumb upon his papers on leaving the country? It would be a sure means of identification, because the lines on no two human being's thumbs are alike. It is a method used in the Orient.

    The Chinese colony in this city has received a knock-out blow in an effect to secure a ruling from Washington, in reference to the last exclusion act. Shortly after the ...

    Chinese
    III G
  • Chicago Tribune -- April 19, 1893
    Wroth Over Chinese Trouble

    When the World's Fair concession for a Chinese bazaar was offered for sale, some South Clark Street capitalists led by Hip Lung and Sam Moy proposed to buy it. Negotiations were still pending when they received a permit from Washington to import Chinese actors and skilled artisans for the bazaar. They at once made a requisition on China for 273 such actors and artisans. But their plans to secure the concession from the Fair directors failed at the last moment when another Chinese syndicate consisting of Hong Sling, Wong Kee and other Mongolians stepped in and took the bazaar rights.

    But according to the tea shop gossip the Lung Moy importations had already embarked for Puget Sound, where they arrived only to be met by cold government officials who refused to let them land. The original permit from Washington was said to be void from the time that negotiations for the bazaar privilege fell to the ground. Accordingly Wong Chin Foo said last night that the colony of 273 was compelled to take a boat back to China without so much as setting foot on American soil.

    When the World's Fair concession for a Chinese bazaar was offered for sale, some South Clark Street capitalists led by Hip Lung and Sam Moy proposed to buy it. Negotiations ...

    Chinese
    III G, I C
  • Chinese Daily Times -- March 08, 1935
    The United States Immigration Inspectors' Activities Amongst Our Chinese Merchants

    We are fully aware that the United States immigration inspectors accompanied by a Chinese interpreter have been visiting all Chinese establishments throughout the city. A. Mr. Jin and a Mr. Wu, both operators of laundries, were taken yesterday by the inspectors to the immigration office for questioning in regards to their eligibility as immigrants. Both however, proved that they were legal immigrants and were consequently released.

    We are fully aware that the United States immigration inspectors accompanied by a Chinese interpreter have been visiting all Chinese establishments throughout the city. A. Mr. Jin and a Mr. ...

    Chinese
    III G, II A 2
  • Chinese Daily Times -- March 30, 1935
    Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association

    In behalf of all fellow Chinese who are anxious to return to China but who have insufficient funds, the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association has, with the co-operation of our Consulate, made arrangements with shipping and railway companies so as to obtain a special reduced fare from Chicago to Hongkong, China. This special rate, however, is limited only to the people who prove themselves to be in need of assistance due to old age, illness, and unemployment, etc. We hope that all those who are planning on returning to China will come personally to make the proper arrangements.

    The Association, as a matter of fact, will even endeavor to help those financially destitute.

    2

    The following are the special fares designated by three different companies:

    1. Blue-Funnel Line - $57.25 (per person from Chicago to Hongkong)

    2. American Dollar Line - $79.10 (same as above)

    3. Canadian-Pacific Line - $79.10 (Same as above)

    In behalf of all fellow Chinese who are anxious to return to China but who have insufficient funds, the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association has, with the co-operation of our Consulate, ...

    Chinese
    III H, II D 10, III G, II D 1
  • San Min Morning Paper -- January 29, 1938
    Mr. Wu Yung-Yang Graduated from Aeronautic Engineering

    Mr. Y. Y. Wu after studying at the University of Indiana, came to Chicago Aeronautical University two years ago, specializing in aeronautic engineering. He graduated on the 27th of this month with ar aeronautic engineering degree.

    While studying here in Chicago, Mr. Wu has established a good record as having been both a president and secretary of the Chicago Chinese Aeronautic Student Association. Mr. Wu, we learn will return to China to serve our country.

    Mr. Y. Y. Wu after studying at the University of Indiana, came to Chicago Aeronautical University two years ago, specializing in aeronautic engineering. He graduated on the 27th of this ...

    Chinese
    I A 1 a, III G, III H