The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Chicago Tribune -- February 12, 1880
    The Celestials

    The Chinese residents for the time being sated with the festivities of the New-Year which have been occupying their attention for the past few days, have settled down to business, but live joyously in the anticipation of the pleasures which are to be enjoyed next Sunday.

    The earlier part of the day is to be devoted to social calls, and in the evening a grand gathering is to take place at a point not yet determined upon. Every mail brings to the residences of the various Chinamen envelopes containing the visiting cards of their friends in New York. Philadelphia, and other Eastern points, and from places in California and elsewhere. These, together with those distributed by local callers, will be carefully hoarded until the New-Year week has passed away, when they will be posted conspicuously upon the walls to serve as an indication of the number of friends possessed by the occupant of the place.

    2

    In this matter the Chinese take great pride, and the American lady whose door is besieged with callers from early in the morning until late at night on January 1st.,is not more an object of envy or admiration in her own set than is the Mongolian whose mementoes of similar attention palpably out-number the collections made by his fellow-countrymen.

    The Chinese residents for the time being sated with the festivities of the New-Year which have been occupying their attention for the past few days, have settled down to business, ...

    Chinese
    III B 3 a, V B
  • Chicago Tribune -- January 17, 1890
    The Chinese New Year

    The Chicago Chinamen are making great preparations for the Chinese New Year, which comes next Monday. All of them are laying in supplies of good things, and paper signs hang in the windows to notify passing Chinamen of the delicacies for sale within. "We call our New Year's day the Sun Down", said cigarmaker San Moy, 319 Clark Street, who is one of the boss Chinamen of Chicago. "It is the sixteenth of the present dynasty-that's the way we count it, you know. We will celebrate it in the usual way, with feasts and religious exercises. We don't have so much fun here as they do in other towns where they are allowed to shoot off firecrackers in the streets. The authorities won't let us go that far. If we had a license we would go ahead and spend every cent we have made in a year".

    The Chicago Chinamen are making great preparations for the Chinese New Year, which comes next Monday. All of them are laying in supplies of good things, and paper signs hang ...

    Chinese
    III B 3 a
  • Chicago Tribune -- January 20, 1890
    Gleeful Celestials Chicago Chinamen Celebrate Their New-Year's Festival

    The Chinese New-Year celebration began last night about dusk. At 3 A.M. it had reached the stage of joyous riot, when a Chinaman begins to have fun. Clark Street south of Van Buren was crowded with happy Chinamen, and more happy Chinamen were bobbing in front of the pictures of the Joss in the Hip Lung store, Bow Wow Fung's, Sam Moy's, and other pleasant resorts, where Chicago Chinamen gather to smoke and have a good time. All the shops were lit, red paper signs hung in the windows, friendly parties of Chinamen were tossing off cups of rice gin, while up-stairs, over the Hip Lung store, a Chinese orchestra was playing for the pleasure of twenty or thirty privileged Chinamen, and a policeman from the Harrison Street station.

    Ex-Lieut. Bowler Honored

    Yesterday morning was spent in preparing for the big Jollification. In the back rooms of the stores paintings of the Joss were hung over little tables on which lay the sticks of incense to be burned later in his honor. The Chicago artist's 2idea of the Chinese Joss resembled ex-Lieut. James Bowler of the Desplaines Street Station. It represents the Joss as a tall man with a fierce eye, a pale-cold face and a dark mustache and goatee. The walls of the shops were papered with pictures of scenes in Chinaland and pictures of the Emperor. Cigar-dealer Sam Moy's portrait of the Emperor made the big man look like a native of County Mayo. "Who painted that picture for you Sam, my lad?" asked Sergt. Dan Hogan of the cigar-dealer. "Mike Casey, down here on Clark Street," replied Sam Moy with a grin. "I thought so," remarked Sergt. Hogan. "By my troth, the Emperor must have been too busy to give him a sitting and sent a proxy from Archer Road!"

    Money in Sam's Purse

    Sam Moy was not offended at this criticism of his decorations. It was a pretty hardthing to offend Sam Moy, or any other Chinese merchant, yesterday. When Sam Moy arose yesterday morning his shop was crowded with customers and the customers all had their pocketbooks out. They had come to settle up their accounts with Sam Moy. On New-Year's every Chinaman must pay his "chit"; if he doesn't do it before 4 P.M. he is disgraced. His friends do not speak to him on the street. Chinese boys peg bricks at him. Chinese women hoot at him from the windows. When 3he dies he goes to a place where he will meet Americans and others. So there was a constant stream of Chinamen entering Sam Moy's all day yesterday, and Sam Moy's face wore a smile of supreme content. When a customer entered he bowed to Sam Moy and said, "Kunghi." Sam Moy bowed to the customer and replied, "Kunghi," which means: "I am your everlasing servant. I humbly bow myself at your feet. I offer you my sincerest wishes for a happy year. May the moon love you. May your head mingle with the stars. May peace and prosperity be yours." The customer paid his bill and Sam Moy handed him a cup of gin and a five-cent cigar. Another customer came in a little while later. The same salutations were exchanged, and he, too, sat down to a cup of gin and a cigar. By nightfall the place was overcrowded. In the little stalls back of the shop half a dozen Chinamen were "hitting the pipe," and in a back room fifteen or twenty were gambling. A feast was set for 6 P.M. This was the menu as at other places: Bird's Nest Soup, Shark's Fin Soup, Fried Flat Fish, Roast Chicken, Roast Pig, Roast Duck, Roast Pigeon, Rice Gin, "Medicine" Wine, Oranges. At 10 P.M. the diners were getting warmed up to the festivities. Rice Gin had been poured in till the little Chinaman who sat next to Sam Moy carried a load that was picturesque and beautiful to behold. The conversation took the form of dialogues. One of the Chinamen yelled across the table to another Chinaman, "Happy New Year." "Happy New Year," replied the other Chinaman. "Good luck 4and prosperity to you." "Peace and happiness to you." "May you eat the skin of the roasted pig." "May wealth attend your ventures." "May your windows be unbroken." "May your fines be suspended." Whenever one of the Chinamen expressed a particularly noble sentiment all the other Chinamen applauded by hammering their dishes with the cups and bowling up some more. Like many other nationalities at midnight nearly every Chinaman in Chicago was a large and ornate drunk, and the New-Year's celebration was humming.

    The incense sticks were burned before the pictures of ex-Lieut. Bowler, the orchestras were tuning up and the Chinamen were starting out on their calls. Each Chinaman carried two bundles of red sheets of rice paper. On each of the sheets of one bundle his name was written or engraved in Chinese characters. On each of the sheets of the other bundle a New Year's greeting was written. Every caller was treated to a bowl of gin and a cigar, the latter being carefully placed in his pocket. Before he left he handed to the host one of the red sheets. From midnight on to daylight all Chinatown was drunk and happy. The orchestre, consisting of a fiddle that plays only one note, a horn that plays another, and two drums that just make a noise, got to work about 3 P.M.

    5

    The two Moy boys, who run the Hip Lung store, threw open the doors leading to the lodgings on the top floors and a great many Chinamen climbed up-stairs to pay their respects to Mrs. Quing Kee. Mrs Quing Kee is a stout German woman. She received their homage with complacency and sent Mr. Quing Kee across the street to fill the "growler." "I can't dring dot rice-chin," she said. "I lige beer better. Quing go ofer by Lawler's, unt get dree pints."

    The Chinese New-Year celebration begins when the moon enters Aquarius and continues till the richest Chinamen in town thinks he has had enough. The merchants of Chicago will keep open house for ten days. The term of rejoicing grows less as the social scale is descended, and some laundrymen, who haven't much money, only keep it up for a day. The solid men of China celebrate sometimes for twenty days.

    The Chinese New-Year celebration began last night about dusk. At 3 A.M. it had reached the stage of joyous riot, when a Chinaman begins to have fun. Clark Street south ...

    Chinese
    III B 3 a, V B
  • Chicago Tribune -- February 06, 1891
    High Day in Chinatown The Celestial New Year Begins Saturday, at Midnight

    Saturday at midnight every self-respecting Mongolian in Chinatown will set fire to his Joss Stick and burn the same under his photograph of his Joss. Teachers in Chinese Sunday Schools will find their customary quota of pupils absent.

    The young laundrymen may have developed much grace during the last year, but it is to be doubted whether a fair percentage are so far rockrooted in their new faith and acquired virtues to devoted any part of next Sunday to a study of the Gospels.

    Sunday is the beginning of the Chinaman's New-Year. Clark Street, in the vicinity of Harrison, will be joyous. It will be a gorgeous glow of red -literally and figuratively. It is the custom of the meek and lowly disciple of Confuscius to become gay on the occasion of a new year.

    2

    He drinks plenteously, eats largely, and further expresses his general satisfaction with himself and the world in which he lives by hanging his banners on the outer walls, so that all may know that the Chinaman is happy. These ensigns are of rice paper, a bright crimson, and bear upon them legends not unlike the stories blazoned on the outside of chests of tea. The purport of these sentiments no man except the Chinese people know, and they decline to give a translation, so that the sentiments may be seditious, critical of duly appointed officials, adverse to the World's Columbian Exposition, or otherwise unfit for publication, and no one be the wiser. There is where the cleanser of linen has upon the situation the "cinch" so to say.

    The observation in its various places will be drawn out for a period of two or three weeks, according to the constitution and bank roll of the celebrant. The opulent and plungers: extends their festivities to great length, the prudent and those of little wealth must of necessity return to the boiler or the cigar makers table sooner.

    3

    It is proposed this year by the few literary inclined to give a few charades and amateur theatricals in a convenient Clark Street basement. Each act will require from one and a half to four days with intermissions for slumber and meals in its presentation.

    Great preparations have been made for the great preparations of joy, and large stocks of salt fish, young pigs, rice, gin and American liquor of red; together with the unaccustomed invoices of pigeons, have been taken by the grocery-man of Chinatown inenticipation of the time of feasting.

    All interrogatories were ignored, and the utmost that could be obtained was the advice to go ask Sholly Kee, with the suggestion sometimes added that Mr. Kee was loaded with information on New-Year and all other subjects.

    4

    Charles Kee is a man of about 30 years, who keeps a cigar factory at 327 South Clark Street. He is without question the best-educated Chinaman in Chicago. The present merry-making, he says, is the commemoration of the beginning of the eighteenth year of the reigning Emperor of China. Years are reckoned according to the lives of Princes and durations of dynasties. Quong Soi, Joss gratia, is the potentate in whose honor his subject of Chicago, of whom there are about 3000, will tamper with their stomachs,

    There will be no Fire-works according to Mr. Kee, because the authorities will not permit such display. But the soothing extract of the poppy will burn, tobacco will be reduced to ashes and barrels of gin and medicine wine" perish from off the earth. All outstanding claims will be paid, or surety given for their future settlement. It is a time for business with Chinamen, as well as a time for sport and it is part of their religion, which is to a large extent based on business principles, to square accounts at the beginning of another year.

    5

    The merry round of visits will be made, the limit taken off fan-tan, and dominoes played wide open and for blood. Larger number of pictures of the god just now in vogue have been made. The chromos are dreams of color - absolute nightmares, and would make the art connoisseurs of the institute insane.

    Saturday at midnight every self-respecting Mongolian in Chinatown will set fire to his Joss Stick and burn the same under his photograph of his Joss. Teachers in Chinese Sunday Schools ...

    Chinese
    III B 3 a
  • Chinese Daily Times -- October 13, 1935
    Independence Commemoration Program by the On-Leong Chinese School

    The Chicago On-Leong Chinese School commemorated its National Independence (Double-Ten) Day yesterday at 3:00 P.M. The occasion also afforded the opportunity of the meeting of the students' parents.

    The auditorium was appropriately decorated and more than 160 persons enjoyed the following program:

    1. Meditation

    2. Three Salutations to the National Ensign

    3. Singing of the National anthem by the entire student body.

    2

    4. Principal Y. T. Moy made the opening address.

    5. Speeches by the Chinese Consul, Mr. Kuo,(who spoke in the Mandarine dialect and was interpreted by Mr. C. P. Kwang, the teacher, to the Cantonese dialect) Mr. J. S. Jin, representing the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association; Mr. Y. C. May, president of the On-Leong Chinese Merchant Association; Mr. K. L. Li, president of the Ning-Yang Benevolent Association and Rev. T. Y. Li of the Chinese Christian Church.

    6. A piano solo by Miss P. J. Tai, a student.

    7. Mr. Kwang Chi-Ping, the teacher, expressed his gratitude to all participants of the program and the honorable guests.

    3

    8. Singing of National Independence anthem by the student body.

    9. A loud acclamation of "Long live the China Republic."

    10. A memorable photograph was taken.

    11. The program was concluded with refreshments. (Financed by the On-Leong Association)

    The Chicago On-Leong Chinese School commemorated its National Independence (Double-Ten) Day yesterday at 3:00 P.M. The occasion also afforded the opportunity of the meeting of the students' parents. The auditorium ...

    Chinese
    III B 3 a, II B 2 f, III B 2, II A 2, IV
  • San Min Morning Paper -- May 29, 1936
    Commemoration of May Thirtieth (A Day of National Misfortune)

    My beloved fellow-countrymen and fellow-students, while we are in the midst of a National crisis we must remember to commemorate the unforgettable May thirtieth, and May thirty-first - day of National misfortune.

    We commemorate May thirtieth because of sacrifices made by our fellow citizens, students and workers due to British and Japanese imperialism.

    We commemorate May thirty-first because of the Tong-Koo treaty - the loss of our Northern China to Japan.

    We have decided to commemorate on May thirtieth, Saturday, 8 P.M. at the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association Auditorium. We hope all patriotic fellow-countrymen will attend as scheduled.

    By participating in this patriotic program we will display the undying spirit of the Chinese Republic, and to express our desire for a united effort in war against Japan.

    2

    We hope all readers will notice the next issue for a detailed program of the meeting.

    Chicago Chinese Consolidated

    Benevolent Association

    My beloved fellow-countrymen and fellow-students, while we are in the midst of a National crisis we must remember to commemorate the unforgettable May thirtieth, and May thirty-first - day of ...

    Chinese
    III B 3 a, III B 2, II D 1, III H, I G
  • Chinese Daily Times -- October 08, 1936
    Chinese Community Pledges Strong Support in Move to Oust Japan- Resolution Asks for American Cooperation

    In observing the 25th anniversary of the Republic of China there will be a mass meeting following the National Day Parade. During the mass meeting a resolution will be pledged by all fellow-countrymen to reiterate our determination to resist to the end the illegal and unjustified invasion of China by Japan. We will pledge our lives, properties and everything we have to strengthen our defense against further Japanese invasion on the one hand and to build up China safe for democracy and insure peace in the Far East on the other hand.

    Japan's invasion of China is a flagrant violation of the elementary rules of international law, Nine-Power Treaty, Kellog-Briand Pact and the League of Nations Covenant. By ruthless killings of civilians in Manchuria and possibly throughout China, including women and children and by wanton destruction of property, Japan has discarded law, order and moral standards on which rests the Peace of the World. In a word. Japan's unprovoked aggression jeopardizes the rights of lives and security of these peace loving people of the World.

    2

    In view of the fact that the foundation of human civilization has been threatened by Japan, who thus places himself as the common foe of Peace and and humanity, we therefore resolve:

    1. That we request our American friends, for the sake of humanity and peace, to curb Japan's ability to make war by instituting personal economic sanctions against her;

    2. That we urge our American friends to support our struggle for our national existence by every and all practical methods possible;

    3. That we call to the attention of our American friends the disastrous effects of a possible Neutrality Act on China when and if formally invoked.

    In observing the 25th anniversary of the Republic of China there will be a mass meeting following the National Day Parade. During the mass meeting a resolution will be pledged ...

    Chinese
    III B 1, III B 3 a, III H, I C, I G
  • San Min Morning Paper -- September 21, 1937
    Commemoration of "September 18th"

    A mass meeting was held last Sunday at the Chinese Emergency Relief Society's Auditorium in commemoration of "September 18th," which marked the Mukden incident of 1931.

    At 7 P.M. the auditorium was fully occupied, and all the late-comers had to stand at the door which is symbolic of the Chinese public enthusiasm.

    The meeting was called to order at 7:30 P.M. by Mr. C. S. Mah, the assistant chairman of the exhortation and publicity committee.

    Mr. Y. C. Moy, president of the Chinese Emergency Relief Society began the program with an explanation of the origin of this commemoration. He, then, introduced the first speaker, Miss Tsuo Shuioli, a student at the University of Chicago, who spoke on "The Commemoration of 'September 18th' and Fighting the Japanese till the End." She emphasized the three important methods of attacking Japan - militaristic, economic and cultural. We, who live abroad, should lead our country towards economic attack by supporting our government financially 2and boycotting Japanese goods, which eventually will result in a Japanese financial collapse.

    Mr. Hwang Kai-Lok, a student at the University of Wisconsin, then, spoke on "Why Americans should be concerned with Sino-Japanese problems?" Mr. Hwang stressed the fact that we should utilize every opportunity to exhortate individually, explain, and give detailed information, if necessary, on Japanese invasion of our Chinese territory. Our duty is to enable the Americans to realize that the Sino-Japanese war is not merely a Far-Eastern problem, but a problem of world peace. The domination of Asia will not appease the wild desire of imperialistic Japan but will seek the domination of Western atmosphere as well. Therefore, if America wants to avoid unnecessary sacrifices due to a possible future war with Japan, she should resent Japanese militaristic movements and sympathize with China by assisting both materially and spiritually.

    The evening program was concluded with the showing of films depicting Chinese civilization and the Sino-Japanese war 3All in all it was a grand program for a grand commemoration. Fellow countrymen who attended the meeting were not only benefited by it, but they left the auditorium with more zeal, enthusiasm, and determination than ever before.

    A mass meeting was held last Sunday at the Chinese Emergency Relief Society's Auditorium in commemoration of "September 18th," which marked the Mukden incident of 1931. At 7 P.M. the ...

    Chinese
    III B 3 a, II B 2 e, I A 1 a, II D 10, III B 1, III B, III H, IV
  • Chinese Centralist Daily News -- October 04, 1937
    Double-Ten Festivity (Chinese Independence Day- October, 10th).

    As Independence Day is drawing near, the Spirit of Patriotism for achieving our goal of final victory in resisting our enemy, Japan, the Chinese Association has selected Oct. 5th, as the day for a Board of Director's meeting to select a committee to arrange a program for the "Double-Ten Festivity" (Independence Day). This will be an occasion to bring together all our fellow country-men in holding a mass-meeting of patriotic nature. As to the selected members of the committee and further detailed information, please read tomorrow's paper.

    As Independence Day is drawing near, the Spirit of Patriotism for achieving our goal of final victory in resisting our enemy, Japan, the Chinese Association has selected Oct. 5th, as ...

    Chinese
    III B 3 a, III H, I G
  • San Min Morning Paper -- October 08, 1937
    The Organizing of a Foreign Publicity Department by the Chinese Emergency Relief Society

    The Chicago Chinese Emergency Relief Society, has recently organized the Foreign Publicity Department for the purpose of advertising our patriotic spirit and its activities. The department will also be responsible for the correction of any propaganda work which might be disadvantageous to us.

    The Publicity Department will adopt three different methods. Speeches, literature and art. Each department will be headed by an expert.

    These plans are definitely in process of completion. In the meantime, how-ever, the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association feels that the impending Independence Commemoration on October 10th, will offer the Publicity Department a wonderful opportunity, as it is quite obvious that many foreigners (Americans) will be visiting Chinatown to witness the Commemoration and the parade.

    2

    The Publicity Department, has consequently decided to print some English pamphlets giving true facts of the Sino-Japanese war and of our economic relationships with the world powers. The pamphlets will be given to as many foreigners as possible.

    Propaganda work of this type, we are sure will not merely entertain the sympathetic neutrals, but also give them a vivid picture of the Sino-Japanese war and its repercussion on the rest of the world.

    The Chicago Chinese Emergency Relief Society, has recently organized the Foreign Publicity Department for the purpose of advertising our patriotic spirit and its activities. The department will also be responsible ...

    Chinese
    III H, II B 1 c 3, III B 3 a, II D 10, III B 2, I C, I G