The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • San Min Morning Paper -- May 29, 1936
    Commemoration of May Thirtieth (A Day of National Misfortune)

    My beloved fellow-countrymen and fellow-students, while we are in the midst of a National crisis we must remember to commemorate the unforgettable May thirtieth, and May thirty-first - day of National misfortune.

    We commemorate May thirtieth because of sacrifices made by our fellow citizens, students and workers due to British and Japanese imperialism.

    We commemorate May thirty-first because of the Tong-Koo treaty - the loss of our Northern China to Japan.

    We have decided to commemorate on May thirtieth, Saturday, 8 P.M. at the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association Auditorium. We hope all patriotic fellow-countrymen will attend as scheduled.

    By participating in this patriotic program we will display the undying spirit of the Chinese Republic, and to express our desire for a united effort in war against Japan.

    2

    We hope all readers will notice the next issue for a detailed program of the meeting.

    Chicago Chinese Consolidated

    Benevolent Association

    My beloved fellow-countrymen and fellow-students, while we are in the midst of a National crisis we must remember to commemorate the unforgettable May thirtieth, and May thirty-first - day of ...

    Chinese
    III B 3 a, III B 2, II D 1, III H, I G
  • San Min Morning Paper -- May 29, 1936
    Rejection of Japanese Applicant for Business Ad in This Paper

    A certain local Japanese restaurant owner applied for an ad in our paper yesterday. The ad was to notify any Chinese who might be interested in buying his restaurant, as he is returning to Japan. He emphasized the fact that the deal should not be known to other Japanese, etc. Now, if he is a Japanese, then he is certainly a traitor.

    But this paper has always upheld the policy of boycotting Japanese goods and executing no economic relationships with them. And because of this policy, we refused to accept the applicant's ad.

    A certain local Japanese restaurant owner applied for an ad in our paper yesterday. The ad was to notify any Chinese who might be interested in buying his restaurant, as ...

    Chinese
    I C, II B 2 d 1, I G
  • Chinese Daily Times -- October 08, 1936
    Facts We Chinese Must Be Familiar with in Our Exhortation Work Amongst Our American Friends

    After several years of most inhuman and wholesale murdering of innocent countrymen, women and children which started from Manchuria in 1931 and it will undoubtedly extend to almost every part of China by Japanese military despots. China is as united as she was on the very first day of hostilities. The crime committed by Japanese military despots brought about this miracle. Every Chinese today has but the same thought, the same ardent desire, and that is to drive out the invaders, and to be able to live in peace.

    Although our American friends have always displayed their respect for justice, their search for progress and an instinctive attachment to the laws of humanity, for several years, Chinese in America have not yet appealed directly to our American friends for assistance of any kind in regard to the blind barbarian passion of the Japanese.

    2

    As the American people would say, "We mind our own business." Rationally speaking, there is a limit to everything a limit to mind one's patience; a limit to one's suffering; and especially, a limit to mind one's own business is also the business of others.

    To understand the Sino-Japanese crisis more clearly, there are some questions people of the world would like to know. Do the Japanese people support their militarist despotic government with sympathy and united effort? Do the Japanese people know what is going on between China and Japan, in China? What have they been told and what do the militarists expect of them?

    Ever since the Japanese invasion of the three Eastern Chinese provinces, commonly known as Manchuria, the Japanese militarist group has declined in prestige as well as in political power. The invasion of China yielded no profit to the Japanese people but a steady increase in taxation and continuous loss of lives of Japanese soldiers due to the resistance of the Chinese volunteers in Manchuria. During the parliamentary elections of the past few years, the Japanese militarists have been defeated again and again by the Japanese people.

    3

    There is a definite hatred and distrust of the Japanese people toward their militarist despots. To get control, to oppress the General Will by popular election has failed to be accomplished. The Japanese militarist despots resort to war against China, attempting to rule the people by iron hands and at the same time to shift the hatred to the innocent Chinese.

    The invasion of China, and the distruction of Chinese lives and property by Japanese militarists aroused not only condemnation by foreign countries but also from their own people. According to eye-witnesses, authentic reports and first hand information Japanese people had been misled, corrupted, and systematically poisoned by their militarists. It is practically well known that Japanese frequently refused to serve in the army and the Premier had to tempt the tax-burdened people to serve by exempting them from taxation. Young Japanese officers were shot in the railroad station in Tokio because they demonstrated against the invasion of a friendly neighbor who has done them no harm. Japanese abroad also show the same resentment against their government.

    4

    We still believe and the majority of the people of the world still believe in the sanctity of treaties, the principle of humanity, that the weak have rights and that the strong have duties, that each nation has every right to life and independence, and that freedom for its own sake is as well worth fighting for today as it was in the past. Indeed, we shall fight for the land where we were born; for the restoration of our lost provinces; and for our children so that they may have the right to think, speak and feel in China.

    Japan has before God, before man and before the ages to come, stained himself forever with the blood of innocent Chinese. If such crime should again triumph (first in Manchuria and second in Spain), the human race would be definitely degraded. Treaties and obligations would no longer have any value, nations no security. All moral effort since the human race has existed would be annihilated, a and there would be no distinction between men and beasts. Cruelty and brutality would rule the world. The very thought of such a terrible state of existence is maddening. Any one who has a heart would brave the worst evils rather than sink to such degradation.

    5

    Ninety percent of the population of the world hopes fervently for peace. But there can be no peace answering to the true meaning of the word, no peace permitting the nations of the earth, great and small, to walk unarmed and unafraid until the respect for laws of humanity and of world opinion shall have supplanted the sway of reign of terror and international lawlessness.

    After several years of most inhuman and wholesale murdering of innocent countrymen, women and children which started from Manchuria in 1931 and it will undoubtedly extend to almost every part ...

    Chinese
    III H, I G, I C
  • Chinese Daily Times -- October 08, 1936
    Chinese Community Pledges Strong Support in Move to Oust Japan- Resolution Asks for American Cooperation

    In observing the 25th anniversary of the Republic of China there will be a mass meeting following the National Day Parade. During the mass meeting a resolution will be pledged by all fellow-countrymen to reiterate our determination to resist to the end the illegal and unjustified invasion of China by Japan. We will pledge our lives, properties and everything we have to strengthen our defense against further Japanese invasion on the one hand and to build up China safe for democracy and insure peace in the Far East on the other hand.

    Japan's invasion of China is a flagrant violation of the elementary rules of international law, Nine-Power Treaty, Kellog-Briand Pact and the League of Nations Covenant. By ruthless killings of civilians in Manchuria and possibly throughout China, including women and children and by wanton destruction of property, Japan has discarded law, order and moral standards on which rests the Peace of the World. In a word. Japan's unprovoked aggression jeopardizes the rights of lives and security of these peace loving people of the World.

    2

    In view of the fact that the foundation of human civilization has been threatened by Japan, who thus places himself as the common foe of Peace and and humanity, we therefore resolve:

    1. That we request our American friends, for the sake of humanity and peace, to curb Japan's ability to make war by instituting personal economic sanctions against her;

    2. That we urge our American friends to support our struggle for our national existence by every and all practical methods possible;

    3. That we call to the attention of our American friends the disastrous effects of a possible Neutrality Act on China when and if formally invoked.

    In observing the 25th anniversary of the Republic of China there will be a mass meeting following the National Day Parade. During the mass meeting a resolution will be pledged ...

    Chinese
    III B 1, III B 3 a, III H, I C, I G
  • Chinese Daily Times -- October 21, 1936
    Why We Should Boycott Japan

    The barbarous aggression of Japan with her wanton bombardments of Chine's noncombatants in defenseless cities is horrifying civilized nations all over the world. Laws are established in every civilized country for the purpose of safeguarding society from demolition by crime. In the same way international laws are established in attempt to make war more "civilized," if such a term can be applied to needless slaughter. But the world today seems to have forgotten this fundamental principle by allowing murderous Japan to indulge in her desire to, perhaps wipe out the peace-loving people of China.

    We as Chinese citizens abroad must convince the rest of the citizens of the world that justice must be done and no greater peaceful weapon can we use than the method which we call "boycott."

    Japan was never a self sufficient country. She boys raw materials from other countries and works them with her cheep labor to compete in world's markets.

    2

    Her national budget has been heavily in the red, and her international trade balance is unfavorable. With these facts in mind, we see how our boycott against Japan will be an effective check upon her war-thirsty militarists.

    In boycotting Japan, would we be accused of violating the law of neutrality? (a law which the United States of America is contemplating of enforcing in case of further Japanese attacks upon our land.) No! The refusal of the United States to render economic assistance to the Japanese war machine would be obeying the spirit of the neutrality law which, while intending to keep America out of war by not sending war materials to either nation, is daily violated as the American people continue to aid Japanese imperialism by their buying of Japanese goods. Would this boycott of Japan endanger the lives of innocent Japanese people who are also victims of the warlord's greed? Again No! The boycott would not starve Japanese non-combatants because Japan is virtually self-sufficient in food products.

    The organization of a boycott against Japan is not as complicated a task as one may think.

    3

    Consumers would be more satisfied with home-made goods which are considerably better than any of the cheap Japanese imitations. Consumers get what they pay for and are not getting more by paying less. If the American consumers realize that their purchasing of Japanese goods is directly financing Japan's bombardments of China, they will conscientously inspect labels or goods and emphatically refuse any article marked "Made in Japan."

    Let us all, fellow countrymen, use our friendly and honest influence in winning our friendly Americans' approval to teach Japan and all other aggressive nations that treaties are not just "scraps of paper." Let us jointly, show the callous imperialists that the civilized people of the world will not remain passive, while a nation "solves" her economic problems with the blood and flesh of innocent women and children.

    Let us all resolve to stop "buying Japanese" - so determinedly that a peoples' fist of united condemnation thrust into the face of Japanese imperialists will bring terror into eyes already bloating on the prospect of a vanquished China, which may be doomed to exploitation on account of her hatred for war and love for peace.

    The barbarous aggression of Japan with her wanton bombardments of Chine's noncombatants in defenseless cities is horrifying civilized nations all over the world. Laws are established in every civilized country ...

    Chinese
    III H, I C, I G
  • San Min Morning Paper -- August 25, 1937
    Patriotic Deeds of Chinese Laundrymen

    C. S. Wu and S. N. Wu, owners of Hwa-Shin Laundry at 58th Street, Chicago, voluntarily contributed the receipts of one day's business, which amounted to well over two hundred dollars toward the War Fund.

    Together with the laundry workers' contributions of their week's wages, the total sum was over four hundred dollars, which is indeed an admirable spirit of patriotism.

    C. S. Wu and S. N. Wu, owners of Hwa-Shin Laundry at 58th Street, Chicago, voluntarily contributed the receipts of one day's business, which amounted to well over two hundred ...

    Chinese
    III H, II D 10, I G
  • San Min Morning Paper -- August 27, 1937
    Chicago Chinese Consulate an Open Letter from the Chinese Embassy

    We are concerned about the growing Sino-Japanese warfare because it means the future of our national government is at stake. But we are, indeed, glad to mention that our oversea fellow Chinese are putting forth all their efforts in backing the national government financially.

    Time and again we have received letters regarding the proper place where the contributions should be sent. Now, in order to solve this problem, the Ambassador is making this public announcement to all fellow countrymen, that the New York Branch of the Bank of China has been decided upon as the contribution receiving center. He also mentioned the two divisions in contributions. That is, all contributions solicited for emergency relief for the dead and the dying will come under the Chinese Red Cross Association, and those of war fund will come under the Chinese Embassy.

    This unique arrangement of the Embassy has been presented to the national government, and we are positive that this will avoid all possible confusion.

    2

    For the sake of convenience to all Chinese in North America the following banks have promised co-operation with the Bank of China in New York.

    First National Bank of Boston, Boston, Mass. Bank of Canton, San Francisco, Cal. Seattle First National Bank, Seattle, Wash. The Imperial Bank of Canada, Toronto, Can. The Imperial Bank of Canada, Montreal, Can. The Imperial Bank of Canada, Winnipeg, Can. The Imperial Bank of Canada, Victoria, Can. The Imperial Bank of Canada, Vancouver, Can.

    We are also negotiating with banks of Chicago and other large American cities for co-operation. We hope all of our countrymen will send their contributions to the above mentioned banks or direct to the Bank of China, 40 Wall Street, New York City.

    But, please remember the safest way to send your contributions is by draft and not cash.

    Regarding the receipt of your contributions, the Bank of China in New York is preparing a special form which will contain the sum contributed and its purpose, etc. This special form of receipt will be available next week. In the meantime all contributions 3will be given ordinary receipts.

    Chicago Chinese Consulate

    We are concerned about the growing Sino-Japanese warfare because it means the future of our national government is at stake. But we are, indeed, glad to mention that our oversea ...

    Chinese
    III H, II D 10, I G
  • San Min Morning Paper -- August 28, 1937
    An Open Letter from a Reader to the Chinese Public

    Edwin C. Hill, a news commentator on the Lucky Strike Cigarette Program, is well known to radio listeners. He is undoubtedly popular but may I say, he is rather untactful as a radio news commentator of a neutral country.

    The bombing of the Shanghai International Settlement on the 23rd of this month, an incident fatal to a number of Americans, was unquestionably an important matter. All the newspapers and radio news reporters made known the fact that the Japanese were responsible for the bombing. Commentator Edwin C. Hill was the only one who insisted that the bombing was done by our side. He also remarked that, it was just as easy for the Japanese to war against the Chinese as "cutting butter with a red hot knife." Such unreasonable and uncalled for remarks on a public radio program is, indeed, more than I, a Chinese, can bear.

    For the benefit of my fellow countrymen I am asking the San Min News to publish this letter. I am suggesting, also, that some individual or organization should represent us in complaining to the Lucky Strike Cigarette Company for its commentator's unjust attitude, and to warn Mr. Hill that hereafter all his broadcasts on Sino-Japanese situations should be impartial. And if he should continue his partial 2attitude persistently, the step we, as Chinese, must take, then, is to refuse to smoke Lucky Strike Cigarettes.

    3

    tial attitude persistently, the step we, as Chinese, must take, then, is to refuse to smoke Lucky Strike Cigarettes.

    Edwin C. Hill, a news commentator on the Lucky Strike Cigarette Program, is well known to radio listeners. He is undoubtedly popular but may I say, he is rather untactful ...

    Chinese
    I C, III H, I G
  • San Min Morning Paper -- August 30, 1937
    The Experience of Chee Hwan-Shiang

    The newly organized Chicago Chinese Emergency Relief Association, was the result of Chinese public opinion. Its rules were, for all Chinese under the jurisdiction of the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association, to contribute accordingly; those who refuse to contribute will be dealt with severely as violators of the rules. Furthermore, no violators will be protected by any individual or organization, - in other words, they must take the consequences unsparingly.

    We learned that on the 27, while the soliciting squads were making their rounds on the North Side, a certain H. S. Chee, owner of a laundry at 6239 Broadway, refused to contribute, and to make matters worse, he even indulged in uncalled-for verbal arguments with the solicitors, which exasperated all who heard of the incident.

    However, H. S. Chee came to realize, shortly afterward, that it was rather a serious matter to exasperate the public. So he asked Mr. C. C. Chao, a Chinatown merchant, to convey his apology to the Chinese Emergency Relief Society - saying, that he was untactful and careless in his conversation with the solicitors, for which he apologizes wholeheartedly. He pleaded for forgiveness from the officers of the Society and promised a contribution of $100. Mr. H. Moy, general director of the 2Society, realizing that is was purely ignorance on the part of Chee, and with Mr. C. C. Chao's sincereness in entreatment on behalf of Chee, he accepted the apology. It was then, and then only, that the public feeling calmed.

    In spite of this unfortunate incident we must say for Chee that he was brave in his repentance.

    The newly organized Chicago Chinese Emergency Relief Association, was the result of Chinese public opinion. Its rules were, for all Chinese under the jurisdiction of the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association, ...

    Chinese
    III H, II D 10, I G
  • San Min Morning Paper -- September 07, 1937
    The Public Exhibition of a War Fund Contribution Violator

    It has been virtually a duty of every Chinese, since the beginning of the Sino-Japanese war, to sacrifice our all in co-operation with our national government. Many of our fellow countrymen are giving their lives on the front for our country, and many more if not all are living a life of momentary horror and affliction. But we, who live abroad can contribute only materially to the support of our government, which is,indeed, a meager bit in contrast to what our fellowmen are sacrificing yet, we are greatly surprised to learn that, there are such cold blooded creatures who care not, even, to give a fraction of what they possess. Such creatures can be classed as renegades.

    We are all aware of the compulsory contribution rules of the Emergency Relief Society which were made to guide us rather than to force as to contribute. So far, the results have been excellent. Unfortunately, a would-be perfect record was marred by a certain employed young Chinese whose name is Liang-Kwang.

    It was during the regular visit of the solicitor, who was engaged in conversation with a would-be contributor, that Liang-Kwang hid himself in a lavatory to avoid contributing. To make matters worse he even used profane language in addressing the solicitor. This cold blooded character and his attitude angered the public 2immensely.

    Yesterday Liang-Kwang was spotted in Chinatown by the investigating squad which, after confirming Liang-Kwang's identity and his attitude, decided upon immediate action against the violator. So Liang-Kwang was ordered to stand on a street corner with a sign on his back. On it was written, "A cold blooded individual who refused to contribute towards the war fund against Japan."

    Many witnessed the embarrassing exhibition and they all agreed that it was Liang-Kwang's own fault. He was not released until the prescribed fine was paid.

    It has been virtually a duty of every Chinese, since the beginning of the Sino-Japanese war, to sacrifice our all in co-operation with our national government. Many of our fellow ...

    Chinese
    III H, II D 10, I G