The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Chicago Tribune -- October 21, 1876
    The Baptists

    The Reverend J. W. Icenberg, from the Committee on Home Missions, read the following report:

    We recognize with gratitude what God has done through our Home Mission Society during the past years of its history, and we recognize the obligations and responsibilities resting upon us as we enter the new century of our country's history, to press forward to the realization of our motto, "North America for Christ".

    THE CHINESE

    The Reverend R. R. Coon, offered the following resolutions:

    Whereas, In the immigration of the Chinese to this country the way has been opened for a free social and intellectual intercourse between them and the people of the United States, calculated to develop free and fraternal relations between the two nations; and, 2Whereas, There has been fostered and organized a strong opposition to this movement, especially along the Pacific Coast, contrary, as we believe, to the plighted faith of this Republic; therefore,

    Resolved, That we hail the present opening as particularly affording a grand and auspicious opportunity to the Christian people of this country for the evangelization of the Mongolian race in our own country.

    Resolved, That it is peculiarly fitting for us as a denomination- identified as we are, in spirit and history, with the free institutions of this nation-to give full and distinct utterance to the sentiment of a common brotherhood in regard to the Chinese, by welcoming them to our land, our charities, and our sanctuaries.

    Resolved, That we recognize in this movement a solemn call, addressed to us in the Providence of God to consider well our Christian obligations to the Chinese, and if possible, in cooperation with our brethren, early to inaugurate some plan to bring them under the influence of the Gospel.

    The Reverend J. W. Icenberg, from the Committee on Home Missions, read the following report: We recognize with gratitude what God has done through our Home Mission Society during the ...

    Chinese
    I C
  • Chicago Tribune -- August 05, 1878
    Chinese Sunday-School

    Ah Ching Yuen, the aristocrat, wore a black satin jacket, a straw hat jauntily tipped on one side of his head, and new felt shoes, which made no sound as he proudly trod across the floor. Lo Bo, being only a hired man on moderate wages, could not be expected to "rag out" very well, but he was neat if not gaudy. Ah Sam Chong, Fong Sang, Low Lee, R. Gin, and the rest of the fourteen Celestials who were present at the banquet (there are twenty-one who actually belong to the Sunday-school) were arrayed in much the same scale of splendor as Lo Bo.

    It is now two months since the Chinese Sunday-school was started in an upper room of Farwell Hall, and already it has attained a place among the prominent religious institutions of the city. An eccentric man with a queer history, David D. Jones, was the founder of it.

    It was a great day for the Chinese - yesterday. The pupils of the Sunday-school had extended a formal invitation to their teachers to participate in a banquet at the close of the regular exercises.

    The regular Sunday-school exercises were gone through as usual. A peculiarity of 2this Sunday-school is that there is a teacher for every pupil. Most of the teachers are ladies. The teaching is necessarily simple in its scope, as few of the almondeyed scholars can speak English.

    These Chinese are said to be extremely grateful for the attention shown them by the "Melican" ladies, and have manifested their gratitude by making them several choice presents. One of the ladies was recently presented with an elegant and costly silk and ivory fan imported from China, and another has been notified that there is a pair of shoes coming for her all the way from that far-off shore. Evidently the "Heathen Chinee" of this city is either exceptionally good or else he has been misrepresented on the Pacific slope.

    Ah Ching Yuen, the aristocrat, wore a black satin jacket, a straw hat jauntily tipped on one side of his head, and new felt shoes, which made no sound as ...

    Chinese
    I A 2 a, I C
  • Chicago Tribune -- February 11, 1880
    Ah Sin's New Year. He Still Keeps it Up

    To adopt that peculiar figure of speech, known as the Irish bull, it may be stated that the Chinese New-Year's Day lasts a whole week. The festive proceedings which Chicago's Mongolian inhabitants inaugurated Monday were sustained with but slight abatement yesterday. Visits were exchanged, and the mails from afar brought mementoes of distant friends in the shape of red visiting cards, of which large collections were to be seen in some of the laundries.

    There are certain religious observances connected with the Chinese New-Year week which some few of the Chinese residents are following strictly, though the bulk of them seem to disregard them entirely. One of these is the burning every morning of certain sheets of brownish paper, upon one side of which is a surface of gold, a similar embellishment of silver being on the other side. Then there are tapers, long slender reed like affairs, which smolder slowly, whose destruction by fire is supposed to have an especially satisfactory effect upon the deity which presides over Mongolian destinies.

    2

    Notwithstanding the demands made upon their time by the special requirements of the season, a large proportion of the almond-eyed laundrymen yesterday devoted themselves to putting a slimy gloss upon the bosoms and cuffs of American gentlemen's linen, excusing themselves for so doing by urging that their patrons were able to crowd their New-Year's visiting into one day, and hence had a right to expect them to do the same.

    During the remainder of this week the fun will be kept up in a quiet way, but next Sunday it is intended to have a mighty gathering of Celestials. There is to be a dinner with Chinese delicacies intermingling on the same board with turkey, roast beef, wine, lager beer and other American institutions, and after the good things have been disposed of there are to be speech-making, music, card-playing (Bill Nye excluded), and other forms of jollity and enjoyment. The only trouble is that when a Chinaman is asked where the entertainment is to come off, his face brightens up with an Ah Sin smile, and he claims that he does not know anything further about it, with an expression of innocence that is most surprising.

    3

    At the same time he is acquainted with the full particulars but, being given to exclusiveness, he feigns ignorance so as to preclude the possible presence of a newspaper man. This banquet will wind up the New Year's enjoyments of Chicago's Chinese population.

    To adopt that peculiar figure of speech, known as the Irish bull, it may be stated that the Chinese New-Year's Day lasts a whole week. The festive proceedings which Chicago's ...

    Chinese
    I B 4, I C
  • Chicago Tribune -- February 17, 1881
    Chinese Club

    Wong Ching Foo called on the Mayor yesterday and tried to induce him to order the police to let No. 103 West Madison Street alone. There is a grocery at this place, the rear part being a gambling-saloon, where the Celestials play "pokee" and smoke opium. Foo told his Honor that the Chinamen met there, not to play cards to win money, but to hear the news and amuse themselves. It was sort of club, and while there was some gambling, the sums staked were very small, and the winnings were spent in the grocery for confectionary. Some of the habitues smoked opium, and it was a shame and dangerous to them to take their pipes away, as the police had done when they made the raid Tuesday night.

    The Mayor did not promise for anything. He, however, instructed Superintendent McGarigle to investigate the matter. So it is likely that the Chinaman's Club will not be interfered with herafater.

    Wong Ching Foo called on the Mayor yesterday and tried to induce him to order the police to let No. 103 West Madison Street alone. There is a grocery at ...

    Chinese
    I H, I C
  • Chicago Tribune -- April 03, 1890
    Chinamen Fear Persecution

    Over sixty Chinamen have sold their laundries in this city, packed up their "layouts" and left in a body for Hongkong by way of British-Columbia late this evening, and a still larger company of laundrymen will, it is said, soon follow them. The reason of this sudden exodus is said to be fear of persecution from the association of white laundrymen, whose lately "formed plan of campaign," is directed against them.

    Over sixty Chinamen have sold their laundries in this city, packed up their "layouts" and left in a body for Hongkong by way of British-Columbia late this evening, and a ...

    Chinese
    I C
  • Chicago Tribune -- August 10, 1892
    Chinese Colony Indignant at the Plan for Detecting Chinamen

    The Chinese quarter on South Clark Street was visited last night by a reporter for the Tribune to ascertain the feeling of those residents as to the photographing and measurements now being taken of Chinese in the large port cities of this country by government officials in furtherance of the recently enacted Exclusion Law. The entire colony sat on the sidewalks and doorsteps. They smoked long stemmed thimble sized bowled pipes or held cigarettes in their mouths. Of the larger tea merchants Sam Moy was not in. As Hip Long's place was reached a sidewalk fight started between two Chinese. Hip Long shouldered his way through the perspiring jabbering crowd of his country-men and in a fatherly way counseled peace. The belligerants were separated and the pipe and cigarette resumed sway.

    The reporter introduced himself to the Tea Prince who angrily waved him away with a Chinese newspaper, as one would brush aside an impetuous fly. The reporter insisted on asking as to the Exclusion Act. Hip Long demanded: "Where you come from"? "The Tribune, will your people consent to sit and be photographed?" "Go way! I not talk".

    2

    Chow Tar was called on. The reporter was met by a servant who shrilly called out "What you want?" The business was explained. He disappeared, quickly re-appeared, and said "He lie down, He not see you". "We get dlink". After he had taken a long robust forget-me-not drink of common Peoria whiskey he said in clear English: "If that law means that all my countrymen, residents in America are to be measured as criminals and labeled as so many packages of tea it will never be enforced. The ridiculousness of its provisions will kill it. Are we not residents here? Do we not pay taxes as all other property holders? It would be more nearly justice for them to drive us out. So long as we are accepted as residents we are entitled to some rights. We are not law breakers. There certainly would be a great deal of trouble should an attempt be made, such as you have indicated to place all Chinese residents on a par with professional criminals. For the record of such measurements and pictures would be classed as a "rogues" gallery. Would this Chinese "rogues" gallery be put on exhibition in the Worlds Fair to show the advancement in civilization that this nation has attained? No, no, I think that a telegram stating that such measurements and photographs are now being taken of Chinese in the cities which are ports must be a hoax. "We take another dlink".

    The Chinese quarter on South Clark Street was visited last night by a reporter for the Tribune to ascertain the feeling of those residents as to the photographing and measurements ...

    Chinese
    III B 1, I C
  • Chicago Tribune -- September 13, 1892
    (No headline)

    The orders recently issued in San Francisco by the Chinese Six companies that no Chinaman shall take out government certificates of residence will be obeyed generally by Chicago Chinamen. Not one Chinaman has been near the Internal Revenue Office since the certificates were received from Washington.

    The orders recently issued in San Francisco by the Chinese Six companies that no Chinaman shall take out government certificates of residence will be obeyed generally by Chicago Chinamen. Not ...

    Chinese
    I C
  • Chicago Tribune -- April 16, 1893
    Wong Chin Foo Thinks Kern Opposed to His Family

    Chinatown is embroiled in a bitter factional strife between two of its leading families, and Wong Chin Foo, the leader of the Wong faction in its prosecution of the Moy faction, has declared open hostility against State's Attorney Kern. The reason he gives is, that in his opinion, he cannot obtain justice through Mr. Kern in the case of Wong Aloy, in whose interests he came from New York. The fight grew out of an assault which was made upon Wong Aloy, a Chinese student at Evanston, by Moy Toi Nye and Ung Yok the night of March 29 last in front of 307 South Clark Street. The assailants were arrested and placed under a $2,000 bond by Justice Clemon. The prosecution was represented by Attorney John B. Strassburger, who had taken an interest in Wong Aloy and who now harbors him at his home, where the Chinaman is still confined in bed as a consequence of the injuries received.

    The Wong family, however, believed that a more vigorous prosecution would be made if their side of the case could be presented in court by an English speaking Chinaman and after holding a consultation telegraphed to Wong Chin Foo to come and assist in the prosecution. Wong Chin Foo arrived in Chicago on April 2 in response to this call.

    2

    Among the first things which Wong Chin Foo advised was the rearrest of the assailants, which was effected. Their bond was raised to $12,000. The bondsmen of Moy Toi Nye and Ung Yok were Hip Lung, whose real name is Moy Choong Few, and Sam Moy. Between these two men, who represent the Moy family and Wong Chin Foo, who represents the Wong family, is the bitter fight. It is openly asserted by Wong Chin Foo that he is unable to secure justice from State's Attorney Kern and that it is impossible for any Chinaman in the city of Chicago who is not friendly to the Moy family to obtain justice through him. In corroboration, as he thought, of this statement Wong Chin Foo, who speaks unusually good English, told the following story yesterday to a reporter of the Tribune:

    "State's Attorney Kern sent word to Inspector Koch of the Harrison Street Station last Friday morning that he wanted to see me at his office. As soon as I was notified by the Inspector, I hired a cab and drove to Mr. Kern's office in company with two detectives from the Central Station, whom I took along as witnesses. On our arrival there I was asked to step into Mr. Kern's private office alone. As soon as the door was closed and we were alone, Mr. Kern dropped into a chair, crossed his legs upon the table and turning suddenly toward me, began the following conservation 'I know you,' he said. "'I am glad that I need no introduction, then,"' I replied.

    3

    'You have come to Chicago to make trouble. You are a fomenter of trouble and a disturber of the peace among Chinamen.' I was amazed and said: "'I guess you have mistaken the man.'" 'No,' he repled, 'I know you through previous disturbances that have taken place in the city. You came here a few years ago and created dissention among the Chinamen.' "'It is true,'" I replied, "'that I came here a few years ago, but it was for the purpose of quelling a disturbance among my countrymen and in this task I succeeded.'" 'I have my information from Sam Moy,' said Mr. Kern, 'who is a resident of Chicago and I prefer his testimony to yours. Moreover I want you to understand that if you prosecute Sam Moy or Hip Lung you prosecute me. Those men are my friends and in no case will I prosecute them.' "' When the Chinamen told me,'" I replied, "' that whatever Sam Moy or Hip Lung did they were all right with the State's Attorney, I did not believe them.'" 'You may believe them. It is true,' said Mr. Kern. "Very well then,'" I replied, "'I will drop Hip Lung and Sam Moy and will fight you. I have fought the New York police and other formidable opponents in the attempt to secure justice for my countrymen and I do not shrink from this conflict. My life is dedicated to the cause of securing them justice and if I loose it in the attempt it will be an honorable death.'"

    John B. Strassburger, the Attorney for Wong Aloy said to a reporter of the Tribune:

    4

    "I went to Mr. Kern and sought his assistance in prosecuting this case. The grand jury was in session and the request might very properly, as it seems to me, have been granted. Mr. Kern refused it and made no secret of the fact that Sam Moy and Hio Lung were his friends, although he did not base his refusal on those grounds. While I have no proof I feel morally certain that Judge Longenerker would have granted my request."

    State's Attorney made the following explanation to a reporter of the Tribune yesterday of the interview with Wong Chin Foo: "In my opinion Wong Chin Foo is an adventurer. He came to Chicago at this time, I think, for the purpose of stirring up a quarrel among the Chinamen, that he may reap benefit from it. I understand from Hip Lung, whom I have known for a number of years as a prosperous merchant and peaceful man, that he is considered a professional mischief-maker, who travels about among his people in an ostensibly, self-sacrificing manner for his personal profit. I think, I understand Chinamen thoroughly, and believing that Wong Chin Foo had come here to create trouble in Chinatown, I thought the surest way of averting it would be to read the riot act to him. Accordingly I unfolded my plan to Inspector Koch and sent word through him to Wong Chin Foo that I wished to see him here. When he came I talked to him rather savagely and gave him plainly to 5understand, that he might look for no help through this department in stirring up trouble which threatened the city's peace. In doing this I performed what I believed to be my duty. To Mr. Strassburger I said that a precedent had been established in this office, that no criminals except fugitives from justice should be presented until they had obtained a preliminary hearing and were duly bound over to the grand jury. I told Wong Chin Foo if it had been a white man in the case he would have been fined $25 and the case disposed of long ago. They are making a trivial matter the excuse for a bitter factional fight.

    Hip Lung was seen yesterday and said that he was told that Wong Chin Foo had held a meeting of the Wong family and advised the members to raise $600 to be given to any man who would kill him, (Hip Lung), and also that Wong Chin Foo had agreed to withdraw the prosecution provided that the Moy family would pay him $500.

    Wong Chin Foo pronounces both of these statements false and absurd and declares that since his arrival in the city he has not been without a body guard for a moment, one of whom is a detective from Chicago Central Station. He asserts that Hip Lung or Moy Choong Few, as his correct name is, has gained his ascendency over the Chinamen of Chicago through his position as treasurer and manager of the Hip 6Lung company, which has houses in San Francisco and Hongkong, China. The term "Hip Lung" means "united prosperity," he asserts and the company is owned by the Moy family.

    Wong Chin Foo says that he thinks that the financial power of this institution is the secret of its influence over civil courts. He says that Hip Lung himself is financially crippled through sending $8,000 a few months ago for the aid of his correspondents in Canada, who got into trouble by smuggling Chinamen into the United States. He states that the Moy family has about five hundred members in Chicago, while the Wong family numbers about fifty. Hip Lung says that his own family has two hundred representatives in the city while the Wong family has about one hundred and fifty.

    Wong Chin Foo is one of the best educated Chinamen in America and a writer of some repute. He is a contributor to several leading journals and is the author of an article on the drama of China, printed on page thirty-three of this issue of the Tribune.

    Chinatown is embroiled in a bitter factional strife between two of its leading families, and Wong Chin Foo, the leader of the Wong faction in its prosecution of the Moy ...

    Chinese
    I F 4, I C
  • Chicago Tribune -- April 19, 1893
    Wroth Over Chinese Trouble

    When the World's Fair concession for a Chinese bazaar was offered for sale, some South Clark Street capitalists led by Hip Lung and Sam Moy proposed to buy it. Negotiations were still pending when they received a permit from Washington to import Chinese actors and skilled artisans for the bazaar. They at once made a requisition on China for 273 such actors and artisans. But their plans to secure the concession from the Fair directors failed at the last moment when another Chinese syndicate consisting of Hong Sling, Wong Kee and other Mongolians stepped in and took the bazaar rights.

    But according to the tea shop gossip the Lung Moy importations had already embarked for Puget Sound, where they arrived only to be met by cold government officials who refused to let them land. The original permit from Washington was said to be void from the time that negotiations for the bazaar privilege fell to the ground. Accordingly Wong Chin Foo said last night that the colony of 273 was compelled to take a boat back to China without so much as setting foot on American soil.

    When the World's Fair concession for a Chinese bazaar was offered for sale, some South Clark Street capitalists led by Hip Lung and Sam Moy proposed to buy it. Negotiations ...

    Chinese
    III G, I C
  • Chicago Tribune -- May 17, 1893
    Affirmation of the Geary Law

    There was no visible worry on the faces of the Chinese residents of South Clark Street yesterday in consequence of the Supreme Court's affirmation of the constitutionality of the Geary Law. The news of the court's action was heard in the Chinese colony a few hours after the decision was announced.

    Charley Key, a Chinaman who runs a cigar factory in the heart of the Chinese colony, and who speaks excellent English, said yesterday that so far as he could learn there was nothing like a panic among the Chinese. "I don't know whether they understand it fully, I did all I could to induce them to register" said he. "What they propose to do, I don't know. There has been no meeting called that I know of. I guess they are waiting for further advice".

    There are 3,500 Chinamen in Internal Revenue Collector Mamer's district, he estimates. About 950 of them have complied with the law and registered. There are, it is stated, fourteen different "factions" of Chinese in this city.

    2

    All are to a great extent influenced by the Six Companies. "The Six Companies sent out circulars some weeks ago advising their countrymen not to register", said an official in the Custom House whose duties bring him into daily contact with the Chinese. "The Six Companies told them that the law would be decided unconstitutional and they believed it.

    Collector Mamer says that no Chinaman had called at his office for the purpose of registration for a couple of weeks preceding May 5, A few called on May 6. "The department at Washington, a short time ago, directed us to hold the law in obeyance", said Mr. Mamer. "We have received no communication since. The law can be enforced without particular trouble. The fact that funds may not be immediately available for deporting Chinese laborers, as I understand it, would not necessarily stop the operation of the law. The business of a government department does not come to a stop because of lack of money. Money is taken from another fund, and the deficiency made up by act of Congress".

    There was no visible worry on the faces of the Chinese residents of South Clark Street yesterday in consequence of the Supreme Court's affirmation of the constitutionality of the Geary ...

    Chinese
    I C, III B 1