The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Chicago Tribune -- February 11, 1880
    Ah Sin's New Year. He Still Keeps it Up

    To adopt that peculiar figure of speech, known as the Irish bull, it may be stated that the Chinese New-Year's Day lasts a whole week. The festive proceedings which Chicago's Mongolian inhabitants inaugurated Monday were sustained with but slight abatement yesterday. Visits were exchanged, and the mails from afar brought mementoes of distant friends in the shape of red visiting cards, of which large collections were to be seen in some of the laundries.

    There are certain religious observances connected with the Chinese New-Year week which some few of the Chinese residents are following strictly, though the bulk of them seem to disregard them entirely. One of these is the burning every morning of certain sheets of brownish paper, upon one side of which is a surface of gold, a similar embellishment of silver being on the other side. Then there are tapers, long slender reed like affairs, which smolder slowly, whose destruction by fire is supposed to have an especially satisfactory effect upon the deity which presides over Mongolian destinies.

    2

    Notwithstanding the demands made upon their time by the special requirements of the season, a large proportion of the almond-eyed laundrymen yesterday devoted themselves to putting a slimy gloss upon the bosoms and cuffs of American gentlemen's linen, excusing themselves for so doing by urging that their patrons were able to crowd their New-Year's visiting into one day, and hence had a right to expect them to do the same.

    During the remainder of this week the fun will be kept up in a quiet way, but next Sunday it is intended to have a mighty gathering of Celestials. There is to be a dinner with Chinese delicacies intermingling on the same board with turkey, roast beef, wine, lager beer and other American institutions, and after the good things have been disposed of there are to be speech-making, music, card-playing (Bill Nye excluded), and other forms of jollity and enjoyment. The only trouble is that when a Chinaman is asked where the entertainment is to come off, his face brightens up with an Ah Sin smile, and he claims that he does not know anything further about it, with an expression of innocence that is most surprising.

    3

    At the same time he is acquainted with the full particulars but, being given to exclusiveness, he feigns ignorance so as to preclude the possible presence of a newspaper man. This banquet will wind up the New Year's enjoyments of Chicago's Chinese population.

    To adopt that peculiar figure of speech, known as the Irish bull, it may be stated that the Chinese New-Year's Day lasts a whole week. The festive proceedings which Chicago's ...

    Chinese
    I B 4, I C
  • Chicago Tribune -- August 10, 1891
    Feast Dead Chinamen

    Fourteen carriages containing four Chinamen each rolled into the entrance of Rosehill Cemetery at 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon, and a little later three street car loads of former residents of the Celestial Empire arrived and joined their countrymen. At first the cemetery officials wondered what their visit meant but later on were informed that the Chinamen had come to feed their dead.

    Little time was lost getting to the plot of ground belonging to the Chinese and almost instantly Hip Lung, their wealthy leader, was surrounded by his friends and after a few words in his native tongue the entire party was engaged in placing all kind of edibles upon the grave. Meats, breads, vegetables, and queer dishes, familiar only to these strange people, were scattered in profusion. While it was all going on a large caldron containing consecrated paper made of an imported punk that had been prepared by the chief religion officer of China, produced a dense smoke, as it was arranged to burn slowly.

    2

    The strange gesticulations and seemingly funny antics cut by the officiating people were extremely interesting to the few white people present. Many thought the pigtails were dedicating their new monument and in order to learn whether of not this had been done Hip Lung was questioned. "It is not a dedication of the monument", said he. It is our custom of feeding the dead. We will not dedicate the monument until next Sunday. We feed our dead today, tonight we feed some of our living - the laundry men".

    In the evening there was a feast at Hip Lung's store 323 South Clark Street. The sidewalk was crowded with Chinese from every part of Chicago, all awaiting the sound of the gong - the tocsin of feast. At 7:30 P. M. the large dining hall on the second floor of Lung's building was ablaze, and the Laundrymen of Chicago enjoyed a banquet such as was never seen or tasted here before. It was given because a nephew had been born to Hip Lung.

    Fourteen carriages containing four Chinamen each rolled into the entrance of Rosehill Cemetery at 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon, and a little later three street car loads of former residents of ...

    Chinese
    I B 4, V B
  • Chicago Tribune -- January 30, 1892
    Celebration of Chinese New Year's

    Incense was burned, wine was drunk, and peans were sung in honor of the great Chinese Joss by hundreds of his Chicago worshippers yesterday. It was their New Year's day, the anniversary of the ascension to the throne of the present ruler of the Chinese Empire, and every one of the hundreds of Mongolians in Chicago was out in holiday attire. All work was suspended, and the scores of dingy, dark basement laundries were lit up for the first time in a year. The walls and windows were decorated with bright colored papers inscribed with words of praise to Joss and the Emperor. In most cases temporary altars were erected, and thanks offerings of flesh and fruit were burned with myrrh and frankincense and aloes, according to a custom said to have been established a thousand years before the Christian era.

    The center of pagan worship in Chicago was on Clark Street, near Harrison. Hundreds of Americans flocked thither to see the display at Hip Lung Hotel and the Bow Wo Fung drug store.

    The Chinese grocery which occupies the first floor was cleared of all merchandise, and the place was fitted up to represent a Joss house. From the ceiling were hung numerous highly-colored rice paper banners. In the rear and above the image of 2Joss were thirteen of them, inscribed in gilt with the thirteen Chinese classics, the work of Kien-loong, an Emperor of great wisdom, who has rested in his grave hundreds of years. Along the north wall were the five virtues handed down by Confucius. They are benevolence, righteousness, propriety, knowledge, and faith. Beneath a portrait of Confucius were the words he is said to have uttered on his deathbed: "The great mountain is broken. The strong beam is thrown down, and the wise man is decayed."

    On a large table in front of the image of Joss were the bronze vessels in which sweet smelling spices were burning. Artistically arranged about these were offerings of Chinese sweet meats, chicken, and roast pig. In a comfortable room on the second floor was Mrs. May Chung Hoy, wife of one of the three brothers who own the hotel. On her lap was little May Fook Kan, who was christened with pagan pomp and ceremony several months ago. Her costume differed little from that of her husband. Her blouse was of heavy, light blue silk with pink sleeves, and her limbs were incased in wide legged trousers of purple silk. Gold rings at least six inches in circumference adorned her ears, and around her neck was a heavy gold band. Her hair was combed straight back from her forehead and wound in an odd coil at the back of her head. The coil could scarcely be seen for the gold and turquoise 3ornaments which adorned her. The chubby legs and arms of the son of May Chung Hoy were loaded with gold bracelets, and on his head was a quaint silk cap covered with metal ornaments, which jingled every time the baby moved. His dress was of light purple silk, with long flowing sleeves.

    In the evening a banquet was served; all of Chinese preparation. During the banquet a Chinese orchestra composed of thirteen pieces played.

    Incense was burned, wine was drunk, and peans were sung in honor of the great Chinese Joss by hundreds of his Chicago worshippers yesterday. It was their New Year's day, ...

    Chinese
    I B 4, V B
  • Chicago Tribune -- February 17, 1893
    Chinese New Year's Celebration

    Chinatown kept open house yesterday. It was the Chinese New Year as well as the Emperor's birthday, and South Clark Street was the scene of Celestial festivities. Every Chinaman was a host, and rice wine, cigars, and bon bons were free to all.

    The gifts were in the form of cash. Every one intending to call provided himself with a supply of silver coins - quarters, halves and dollars - and did them up neatly in red paper. When rice wine, cigars, and dainties were served he quietly deposited in the center of the table his gift of cash. It was a day of incessant eating, drinking, and handshaking.

    Chinatown kept open house yesterday. It was the Chinese New Year as well as the Emperor's birthday, and South Clark Street was the scene of Celestial festivities. Every Chinaman was ...

    Chinese
    I B 4
  • Chinese Centralist Daily News -- September 22, 1937
    Notice of the Funeral Ceremonies of Mr. Frank Moy

    In order to console the eminent, patriotic and heroic spirit of the deceased, we ask all Chinese organizations and fellow- so journers who intend to send funeral scrolls, flowers, odes and elegies, to send them as early as possible to our office of funeral ceremonies, because we want plenty of time to make the proper arrangements before the services. It will take place on Sept. 30th, 1937 at 8:30 P. M. at the Chinese Presbyterian church.

    By- The Chicago Chinese Consolate

    The Chicago Chinese Association

    The Chicago Chinese Civilian Relief

    Association

    The ceremony office address is-

    Chinese C.B. Association

    2249 Went worth Avenue

    Chicago, Illinois.

    In order to console the eminent, patriotic and heroic spirit of the deceased, we ask all Chinese organizations and fellow- so journers who intend to send funeral scrolls, flowers, odes ...

    Chinese
    I B 4, III B 2, II D 1
  • San Min Morning Paper -- September 24, 1937
    The Funeral Service of Mr. Frank Moy, General Director of the Chicago Chinese Emergency Relief Society

    Mr. Frank Moy, general director of the Chicago Chinese Emergency Relief Society, died from over-exertion in patriotic activities. What touched our hearts was the fact that Mr. Moy was one person who actually gave his life for his country. He breathed his last while persuading his fellow countrymen to contribute towards the defense and relief funds.

    These are the reporter's impressions of yesterday's memorable funeral of Mr. Frank Moy:

    1. The patriotic spirit of the Chinese public was apparent in their expression of deep sorrow and sympathy.

    2. The spirit of organizational and individual unity has never been greater in the history of the Chicago Chinese community.

    3. The combination of love for fellow countrymen and of patriotism gives the reporter a greater assurance of our ultimate victory in war against Japan.

    2

    The following is the reporter's account of yesterday's unforgettable funeral:

    Funeral services took place in the Chinese Christian Church on Wentworth Avenue. The bier was placed in front of the pulpit and a picture of the deceased directly above it. The entire rostrum was covered with fresh flowers and wreaths. The Church Chamber was adorned from end to end with more than four hundred pairs of elegiac scrolls.

    The following is the program of the service:

    1. Announcement by Rev. T. Y. Lee. 2. Funeral songs. 3. Reading of scriptures. 4. Hymns. 5. Relation of a brief biography of the deceased by Mr. Y. T. Moy, president of the On-Leong Chinese Merchants' Association. 6. Prayer by Rev. Lee followed with meditation. 7. Mr. S. A. Lee, vice-president of the On-Leong Chinese Merchants' Association,expressed his gratitude to all those who paid their last homage to the great Chinese leader. 8. Relatives and friends then passed the bier to pay their last homage to their deceased leader.

    Besides the relatives and friends, all Chinese organizations in Chicago were represented 3at the funeral service.

    The funeral procession was thus arranged: 1. Police patrol. 2. Memorial tributes. 3. Band (Western music). 4. Floral car with Mr. Moy's picture. 5. Elegiac scroll bearers. 6. Flowers and wreaths. 7. Memorial tributes. 8. Band. 9. Elegiac scroll bearers. 10. Flowers and wreaths. 11. Floral car. 12. Hearse. 13. Immediate relatives. 14. President of the On-Leong Chinese Merchants' Association. 15. Presidents of all On-Leong branches. 16. Other officers of the Chinese organizations in Chicago. 17. Memorial ascription by the Chinese Emergency Relief Society 18. Band. 19. Elegiac scroll bearers. 20. Flowers and wreaths. 21. Memorial ascription by the committee of funeral arrangements. 22. Committee members. 23. Memorial tributes by Moy's Benevolent Association. 24. Band. 25. Elegiac scroll bearers. 26. Flowers and wreaths. 27. Memorial tributes by both the Chinese and American friends. 28. Chinese and American friends of the deceased. 29. Memorial tributes by the officers of the Chicago Chinese organization. 30. All officers and members of the Chicago Chinese organizations. 31. Memorial tributes by Moy's Benevolent Association. 32. Officers and members of Moy's Benevolent Association. 33. Chinese band and six other American bands which completes the funeral procession.

    4

    There were more than three hundred automobiles and more than a thousand mourners participated in the funeral procession. Then, of course, there were thousands of on-lookers and by-standers.

    Traffic in Chinatown was tied up for hours. The normal order was not restored until the procession reached the cemetery where thousands more had gathered to witness one of the most spectacular funerals in the history of Chicago.

    Due to the limited available space, your reporter has given you just a brief outline of the great funeral procession. As a matter of fact, there are no available words to express such solemnity, lavishness, and patriotic spirit.

    Mr. Frank Moy, general director of the Chicago Chinese Emergency Relief Society, died from over-exertion in patriotic activities. What touched our hearts was the fact that Mr. Moy was one ...

    Chinese
    II B 1 c 3, II B 1 a, III B 2, II D 10, II A 2, II D 1, I B 4, III H, IV
  • Chinese Centralist Daily News -- September 24, 1937
    Mr. Frak Moy's Funeral

    Our general director of the Middle-Western Chinese Civilian Relief Association of Chicago, was taken by death on Sept. 17th, at 6 A.M.

    The On-Liong Association has been in charge of his funeral and the service was held at 2 P.M. yesterday at the Chinese Presbyterian Church on 23rd and Wentworth Avenue.

    The church was filled with funeral flowers. Every space was taken by the hundreds of relatives and friends, that was available, ( including his American friends.)

    The services opened with a prayer by Rev. T. Y. Li, followed by a three minute meditation. Then a song was sung by the chorus and the reading of a brief biography of Mr. Frank Moy by the president of the On-Liong Association, Mr. Moy U-Cho, followed. Again a song of grievance.

    2

    Then vice-president Mr. Li -Shen-Wei representing the On-Liong Association and the family of the deceased took lead in acknowledging their relatives and friends sympathies.

    The service concluded with Rev. T. Y. Li leading the congregation past the coffin to pay their last respects to the deceased, Mr. Frank Moy.

    Then the immediate relatives of Mr. Moy and the officers of the Qn-Leong Association escorted the coffin to the hearse. The funeral procession was formed with a special police patrol leading the hearse. Following immediately were his American wife, daughter, relatives and intimate friends. Then a long procession of both American and Chinese friends representing all Chinese Associations and clubs etc.

    The prominent men present included Vice-consul Mr. Wang and Mr. H. Moy, representing the On-Liong Association of Washington, D.C.

    3

    After reaching the Chinese cemetery, Rev. Li offered prayer and again relatives and friends paid their final respect by saluting the deceased, before burial.

    The funeral procession numbered thousands and certainly the greatest ever seen.

    We conclude, therefore, that the patriotism of the deceased and services rendered to his fellow-men have obviously commanded the respectful devotion of us all.

    Our general director of the Middle-Western Chinese Civilian Relief Association of Chicago, was taken by death on Sept. 17th, at 6 A.M. The On-Liong Association has been in charge of ...

    Chinese
    II D 1, II D 10, III B 2, II A 2, I B 4, III A, I G, IV