The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Chinese Daily Times -- March 05, 1935
    Education in Home and School

    The power of a nation depends upon the qualification of its citizens; the qualification of a citizen depends upon the education of the individual; and education is indeed, the most influential factor in the existence of a nation.

    Education may well be divided into two distinctive classes, they are school education and home education. The latter is generally termed "home-training" and is fundamentally most important as it deals with the most plastic years of a human being. In fact, home-training is so important that it guides and sometimes determines our future. Upon the shoulders of our parents, then, rests the vital responsibility of home-training.

    Parents, who are ready to undertake the difficult task of raising children, should first of all, realize that their children are born innocent, and they must see to it that their innocence is not jeopardized by ignorance.

    2

    The innocent children are born with the instinct of imitation and learn through their senses of hearing and seeing. They know not right from wrong, nor wrong from right. Whatever they see, they do; whatever they hear, they say. It is, therefore, important that good parents watch their own conversation and actions. If the parents, unfortunately, should possess some undesirable habits, they should refrain from indulging in them in the presence of their alert children, because rarely do the children have habits which they have not acquired from their parents. Fortunate indeed are parents, to have the privilege to play such an important role in the life of the next generation! But how delicate, how important, and how difficult, is their task! Unfortunately because parents are unable to Perform such a task, we have our wide national illiteracy.

    Besides home-training then, is the equally important school education, We, undoubtedly, know that the responsibility rests with the teachers and instructors 3The teachers' responsibility should not be a mere scholastic achievenemt but should rather be the character formation of the students. We regret to admit again that the lack of a nation-wide educational system and the ignorance on the part of our teachers as to their real duty is the second of the two predominant factors in our national illiteracy.

    Our corruptive educational system of the Chin Dynasty need no further expression of opinions as we all are more or less acquainted with it. But the so-called modern educational system of today is what we are concerned with. It is a pity that a good percentage of our modern teachers have neglected their fundamental duty of character building. In fact, teachers who live the lives of play-boys have become numerous. And there are teachers who are so involved in politics that they can practically call their schools political centers. No doubt, these vices and hobbies are but personal characteristics, but they are of such an import to the future of the students that we who are interested in our children's welfare must take immediate action.

    4

    The responsibility of the parents in the homes and of the teachers in the schools is clear to us. No doubt, we are away from our homeland but if we perform our duties here in our Chicago Chinese community efficiently we shall soon find our children playing an important part in the development of our national life.

    Parents who are interested in our national welfare should pay immediate attention to the home-training of their children. And to the teachers may we suggest that they should refrain from political activities and be molders of character as well as teachers of learning. With the fullest cooperation of all concerned, we are sure, our country will soon be one of the strongest in the world.

    The power of a nation depends upon the qualification of its citizens; the qualification of a citizen depends upon the education of the individual; and education is indeed, the most ...

    Chinese
    I A 1 a, I B 3 b, III H
  • Chinese Daily Times -- March 08, 1935
    Essential Factors in the Nationalized Educational System

    Our ever-increasing associations with the foreign world are beginning to penetrate the foundation of our 6,000-year-old civilization, foreshadowing changes in the social and economic fabric, and in the traditional philosophy and ethical outlook of our people, of greater significance than the more dramatic changes in the political sphere.

    Our virtually unchangeable independent ideals have, at long last, come to submit and to react to extraneous influences. We are beginning to realize that the stability of our age-old civilization has left us trailing behind the comparatively new nations. We are convinced that a momentous transformation must take its course. But little are we aware of the fact that there are no other influences that have done and will do more to unify the people, reconcile diverse points of view, eliminate provincial or state jealousies, set ideals for the people, and train leaders for the service of the state and the nation, than nationalized education.

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    Indeed, modern industry and forms of government demand in the average citizen a higher standard of knowledge and training than formerly sufficed. Education aims at conserving and perfecting the life of the community, but that life is nothing other than the life of the individual. Education, then, is the determiner of a person's future.

    A school, the generally recognized center of education, when its functions are properly performed, is a genuine society inspired by the best ideals of national character and therefore able to transmit to and confirm in its pupils the traits which enter into those ideals ideals of the new and not of the old.

    Whether or not a school is capable of performing its functions properly depends entirely upon the structure and organization of a nationalized educational system, a system which provides for all citizens the acquisition of individual development through the so called "public school education," an organization which possesses its distinctive feature in the replacement of 3the old conception, - in which schools corresponded mainly to social stratification, - by the idea that children of all classes should have an equal opportunity at a primary education designed to meet the needs of childhood, followed by a post-primary or secondary education adjusted to the needs of adolescence. Thus a young man is at last equipped with the common knowledge of his social and economic responsibilities and activities in his immediate community.

    The so-called "public school education" has enabled the young man to weigh the difference between the primitive tendency of a community towards the complete subordination of an individual and the modern tendency towards the increasing valuation of individual life. Education, therefore, is indeed the stimulating factor in a child's - a youth's - a young man's ever-increasing realization of his individual valuation to his community, state and national government.

    It is obvious, then, that the individuals or citizens make a country; education 4makes an individual; and, therefore, education makes a country.

    It is no doubt easy to visualize and to realize the importance of education, primary, elementary, and public-to-a nation, but to establish and to perform a nationalized educational system is another question - it is difficult. I say it is difficult, especially in our country, because of its tremendously vast area, unstable political situation, inefficient transportation and communication, and lastly, lack of economic nationalism. But in view of these unquestionable obstacles our duty is to rouse the spirit of the people of the republic to perform the seemingly impossible in order to accomplish the indispensable.

    Surely, we can recall what Dr. Sun Yat-Sen did for our country. Yes, he performed what the people of prior to 1911 thought was impossible. But in October, 1911, the nation witnessed the miraculous change - from an Imperialistic government of four millenium to the present day Republican government. I say, therefore, if there is will there is power.

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    Knowing what is indispensable to our nation, let us all put forth the individual efforts in performing the impossible and the acquiring of the indispensable - the nationalization of educational system.

    My personal opinion is that an efficient nationalized educational system must embody the following factors:

    1. The organization of a board of education in town, city, county, state, and headed by the executive committee of the education department in the central government. Like a national government, the educational system must be efficiently organized and maintaining an absolute relationship between the sub-department and the central office.

    2. Any educational fundamentals, reports, changes and functions must be opinioned by the national experts and then sanctioned by the national executive committee of the central education department before they are to be nationalized.

    6

    3. Executive orders of the central office of the department of education must be strictly observed by the state, county, city and township boards. Any plans or schemes of specific changes and improvements of certain localities should be presented by the township board to its immediate superior who in turn will do likewise, which means, eventually, that the national executive committee of the educational department will directly supervise all changes and improvements in all localities - a system of efficient nationalization.

    4. The state should be responsible in developing the middle class talent, and the national central office should be responsible in the making of all talented research workers and specialists.

    5. All educational commissioners and staff members should be supported by the locality with the sanction of the national central office. In case of financial insufficiency or over-appropriation for such a program, the central office should see to the balance.

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    6. Elementary and middle school operations should be financed by the city and state, and the national central office should finance educational institutions beyond the middle school - such as colleges and technical institutions, etc.

    In case a city or a state is unable to raise sufficient funds for its own elementary and middle school expenditures, the central office will, naturally, supplement the balance.

    7. Experimentation in the field of educational functions is very essential. Each locality or township should be allowed the opportunity, without national interference, for educational experimentations which, of course, must not go beyond the central office educational fundamentals. This opportunity will naturally encourage unlimited progress and expansion in all localities.

    8. If a town or a city is unable to establish its elementary and middle school, or such operation may involve more than one town or city, then the 8state should take the full responsibility.

    If educational functions should involve more than one state, the operation automatically becomes a national central office problem.

    In other words, the national executive council of the educational central office should always be the basic foundation in all educational enterprises - giving, however, all chances possible to staff members of each locality through out the nation for a maximum exercise of initiative in supplying the exact need of their own locality.

    If we can consider thoroughly the above factors in the nationalization of our educational system, I am sure the result will not be far from what has been accomplished by this country.

    In promoting such a program may I say that we who are abroad, especially in this country, should assume the leadership. The reason is because we are 9living in a country with a perfect educational system, a country which has achieved more during the past century than any other nation in the world, due largely if not totally, to its efficient educational system. We who realize the important part education is playing in national standing, should, therefore, do our utmost in promoting and advancing the efficient nationalization of our educational system.

    Our ever-increasing associations with the foreign world are beginning to penetrate the foundation of our 6,000-year-old civilization, foreshadowing changes in the social and economic fabric, and in the traditional philosophy ...

    Chinese
    I A 1 a, III H, I E
  • Chinese Daily Times -- March 12, 1935
    A Farewell Banquet in Honor of Mr. Y. C. Li by the Nationalist Party

    The Chinese Nationalist Party of Chicago entertained Mr. Li at a banquet yesterday on the occasion of his departure for China.

    Mr. Li is a well known nationalist pioneer who has done much for the development of the Chicago Nationalist Party. His popularity in our Chinese community has been great because of his resourceful financial assistance to Chinese students who were in financial difficulties.

    All the leading Nationalist members, including the editor Mr. Jin Liang - Fu, were present at the banquet. Every speaker praised Mr. Li for his untiring patriotic activities, his generous assistance to the needy students and his devoted interest in the development of our Chinese community in Chicago.

    We understand that Mr. Li will leave for China by way of San Francisco.

    The Chinese Nationalist Party of Chicago entertained Mr. Li at a banquet yesterday on the occasion of his departure for China. Mr. Li is a well known nationalist pioneer who ...

    Chinese
    III H, I A 1 a, II D 10
  • Chinese Daily Times -- March 29, 1935
    Chinese Problems Discussion Association

    An invitation is extended to all fellow countrymen who are interested in our Chinese problems to attend the scheduled meeting on March, 29th, (7 p.m.) at the International House, room C D E.

    The following is the program:

    A. Discussion.

    1. Expansion of Chinese Commercial interests and enterprises in Chicago By Consul Kuo.

    2. Legal problems of the Chinese in Chicago - by attorney G. L. Wei.

    3. Problems of the Chinese population, home, and society - by Mr. C. P. Sio.

    4. Methods of obtaining an accurate account of Chinese living and economic conditions in Chicago - an open discussion.

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    B. Entertainment.

    1. Chinese string instrumental music by Miss F. Y. Chen and Mr. Y. M. Gien.

    2. A Chinese vocal solo, by Miss C. W. Tsuo.

    3. Piano solo by Miss K. L. Hwang.

    4. Refreshments - tea and ice-creams, Program by the Chinese Student Association of Chicago University.

    An invitation is extended to all fellow countrymen who are interested in our Chinese problems to attend the scheduled meeting on March, 29th, (7 p.m.) at the International House, room ...

    Chinese
    II B 2 g, II B 1 a, I A 1 a, II A 1, II A 2, III E, I M
  • Chinese Daily Times -- August 14, 1935
    All America Chinese Student Association

    Arrangements for the coming mass meeting of all Chinese students in the United States is progressing rapidly. Every Chinese student association of the various schools all over the country will each send a delegate to the Chicago meeting which will take place August 30 to September 5, 1935.

    We understand that the Chicago Chinese Student Association due to the coming meeting has been working very hard in renting the meeting hall and selecting the proper temperary resident quarters for the delegates. Such negotiations were properly made.

    They have also decided upon the problems to be discussed during the meeting, and the daily meeting programs were tentatively planned. All student problems will be discussed and investigated by separate delegate groups and for a final discussion and decision during the general meeting. A tentative program was sent to each of the delegates by mail yesterday.

    We learned that the Chicago Chinese fellow country-men are very enthusiastic and sympathetic toward the principle, work, and organization of the All America Chinese 2Student Association. They have been very co-operative with the Association financially.

    Mr. K. L. Lee, president of the Chinese Consolidated Association and Mr. T. Tang, general manager of the Chinese Trade Company have taken upon themselves the obligation of expenses incurred by the student delegates' sight-seeing trips and their noon dinner, to fulfill a rightful duty as hosts and the spirit of sympathy and helpfulness.

    Arrangements for the coming mass meeting of all Chinese students in the United States is progressing rapidly. Every Chinese student association of the various schools all over the country will ...

    Chinese
    III B 4, I A 1 a, III E
  • Chinese Daily Times -- September 04, 1935
    Chinese Natural Science Club American Branch Bulletin

    The Chinese Natural Science Club is recognized as the power of pure science.

    The club was organized eight years ago at Nanking Centralist University. Its aim was to spread the common scientific knowledge to the public.

    The work of the club, at first, was the publication of a magazine named Scientific World. Then followed a monthly lecture on the air from the Centralist Wireless station. Club memberships increased up to many hundreds within a few years and the club functions likewise expanded. The club propsed a natural science course in the Middle School (High School) and the establishing of a research laboratory and a scientific library, etc. Because of the expansion in club functions and the increased memberships, it was necessary to establish branches, not only all over the country, but all over the world. (We realize that there are thousands of Chinese studying abroad.) The American branch was one of the many branch clubs established last year.

    This club was first organized in our country and then branched abroad. Therefore, on a comparative basis, as far as memberships are concerned, we naturally have 2more members in our country than abroad. There are over a thousand Chinese students in America and almost half of them are pursuing a natural science course.

    Due to the fact that our branch clubs here in America were newly established, it was naturally known to very few. We are, therefore, sending the president of the American branch club, Dr. D. H. Jung and Mr. C. Tsai and other to represent the Chinese Natural Science Club at the All America Chinese student delegate conference in Chicago. This will provide opportunity for those who are interested in our club to make the proper arrangements for membership.

    We believe all of you are enthusiastic as a matter of fact too willing to serve your country. We conclude, therefore, that all of you will show your interest in upholding our club whose work and objective is for the "happiness and good fortune of the people."

    As for the qualifications of a membership and its arrangement, will you all kindly get in touch with Dr. Jung whose address, during the student delegate conference, will be room, #473, International House.

    The Chinese Natural Science Club is recognized as the power of pure science. The club was organized eight years ago at Nanking Centralist University. Its aim was to spread the ...

    Chinese
    II B 2 c, I A 1 a, III B 4, III E, III H
  • Chinese Daily Times -- September 01, 1936
    Miss S. F. Chang Off to Cleveland to Join Air Race

    Miss S. F. Chang left Chicago yesterday at 2 P.M. to join the international air races at Cleveland. Her participation in such an international event has indeed increased our national reputation.

    The local Chinese aeronautic student association sent Mr. Y. S. Sang as its representative to accompany Miss Chang off the Chicago airport on a separate single-winged plane.

    Miss S. F. Chang left Chicago yesterday at 2 P.M. to join the international air races at Cleveland. Her participation in such an international event has indeed increased our national ...

    Chinese
    II B 3, I A 1 a, III E, I K, IV
  • Chinese Daily Times -- September 05, 1936
    Dr. Se Moy-Yu Visited Chicago

    The famous Chinese doctor Miss M. Y. Se was born in Chiang-Si, China. She graduated from Michigan University Medical college in 1896. She returned to China soon after graduation and devoted all her life to Medicine. She has established hospitals and schools both in Shanghai and Chien-Chiang.

    Results have been excellent.

    A few days ago she arrived in Chicago on her tour of America. And last night she attended the Chicago Children's Memorial Hospital banquet for all Chicago woman doctors.

    The famous Chinese doctor Miss M. Y. Se was born in Chiang-Si, China. She graduated from Michigan University Medical college in 1896. She returned to China soon after graduation and ...

    Chinese
    I A 1 a, III H
  • Chinese Daily Times -- September 22, 1936
    Mr. G. P. Moy Leaves for China after Graduation

    Mr. S. P. Moy, son of a local Chinese merchant, Mr. T. L. Moy, was graduated from the Armour Institute, school of electrical engineering, with an excellent record. He left Chicago yesterday on his way to China for a position in Shanghai or Canton.

    Mr. S. P. Moy, son of a local Chinese merchant, Mr. T. L. Moy, was graduated from the Armour Institute, school of electrical engineering, with an excellent record. He left ...

    Chinese
    I A 1 a, III H
  • Chinese Daily Times -- October 12, 1936
    The Monthly Publication of the Chinese Student Association of North America

    We recall about a year ago when the Chinese Student Association began soliciting for funds in promoting the publication of the Student Association Monthly.

    As a result of our fellow countrymen's (merchants) interest in the student organization they have contributed generously and thus materializing the dream of the student body - a Student Monthly.

    The Student Association in expressing their gratitudes for the generosity of the contributors, has published a complete list of the contributors in the first issue.

    Our fellow merchants have made it possible in materializing the only means of uniting the spirit and ideals of our students scattered throughout North America. But we must remember too, that the existence of the publication depends also upon your continual support by subscribing to it which we believe is $2:00 per year.

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    Financially it is too meager to be termed as a business proposition and it is assured that your cooperation will be fully rewarded in the form of literary contributions by the students.

    We recall about a year ago when the Chinese Student Association began soliciting for funds in promoting the publication of the Student Association Monthly. As a result of our fellow ...

    Chinese
    II B 2 d 2, I A 1 a, III E