The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Svornost -- July 08, 1878
    [Jan Hus Celebration]

    The Jan Hus celebration, which was arranged by "Tel. Jednotow Sokol" (Gymnastic Union Sokol) last Saturday turned out successfully even though a larger crowd would have been better.

    The hall was richly decorated with Native and American flags. In the center of the gallery was a large painting of "Jan Hus" the fine work of our countryman, Mr. Zajicek.

    The program included a festive speech by Mr. Frant.Bol. Zdrubka, Concert selections by Mr. J. Novak's band, gymnastic exercises and singing by the singing club, all of which were carried through successfully to the satisfaction of all present.

    The Jan Hus celebration, which was arranged by "Tel. Jednotow Sokol" (Gymnastic Union Sokol) last Saturday turned out successfully even though a larger crowd would have been better. The hall ...

    Bohemian
    III B 3 a, III B 3 b, II B 3
  • Svornost -- July 07, 1879
    John Hus Celebration

    The active Telocvicne Jednota Sokol (Sokol Gymnastic Union) has celebrated this year, as it always does, the memory of our never-to-be-forgotten leader, who for his insistence on truth and freedom of thought died far away from his native land in the flames of a charnel-house fire.

    The celebration consisted of two sessions, one in the afternoon and one in the evening. At the evening session Tyls's dramatic poem "Jan Hus" was presented by amateur actors. The afternoon session began with a concert by J. Novak's well-known orchestra; this was followed by "Tyrol," sung by the Choral Society. With the assistance of orchestra and singers Mr. Vacl Zajicek gave a monologue entitled "Delnik Boz Prace" (A Workman without Work), which was a great success. The timely poem "Prace" (Work), read by Mr. F. Stetka, was also well received. The celebration as a whole as well as the several productions which it comprised was entirely satisfactory to all those who attended.

    The active Telocvicne Jednota Sokol (Sokol Gymnastic Union) has celebrated this year, as it always does, the memory of our never-to-be-forgotten leader, who for his insistence on truth and freedom ...

    Bohemian
    III B 3 a, III B 3 b, II B 1 c 1, II B 1 a, II B 3
  • Svornost -- July 07, 1880
    Jan Huss Memorial

    The celebration last night in the "Tel. Jed Sokol" (Gymnastic Union Sokol) hall, in commemoration of the burning at the stake, of Master Jan Hus, was carried out in a dignified manner. A very fine portrait of our great defender of free thought and free speech, banked by flowers and the Colors of the Tel. Jed. Sokol (Gymnastic Union Sokol) was displayed upon the stage. Plainly to be sure, but nevertheless suitably decorated, it was somewhat significant of the noblemindedness of our women's organizations.

    Shortly after 8 o'clock, Mr. J. Novak arrived with his well-liked musicians ensemble and cheerfully and willingly rendered two praiseworthy compositions, before the speaker, Mr. Fr. B. Zdrubek, took his place. The ceremonial speech befitting the occasion was received with fervent gratitude. Toward the end of the speech three cheers were given for the memory of Jan Huss, three cheers to the success of Tel. Jed. Sokol were also given. After this the band again played and after receiving much praise, which was demonstrated by means of the general applause given, the audience left for their homes.

    2

    We cannot refrain from saying, with warranted bitterness, that the cancer of disinterest is beginning to eat into the enthusiasm and life of our community, not only in political affairs, but on occasions, where it should appear as one unanimous body to show that it continues to foster warm sentiments for all things that tend toward the consecration of the spirit of free thought. There was a comparatively small audience present at yesterday's ceremonies in memoriam of Jan Huss.

    The celebration last night in the "Tel. Jed Sokol" (Gymnastic Union Sokol) hall, in commemoration of the burning at the stake, of Master Jan Hus, was carried out in a ...

    Bohemian
    III B 3 a, III B 3 b, II B 3, IV
  • Svornost -- July 04, 1883
    National Holiday. (Editorial)

    Today is the Fourth of July and the American people celebrate the anniversary of the Foundation and Proclamation of Independence. The experts in the history of the United States have determined which day was the most important in American history, and should be celebrated in the most fervent way. We Bohemians have nothing to do with the arrangement of the celebration, but we will stick to the sentiment of the whole American nation and will celebrate with them.

    2

    In the same way as the churches call their followers, on church holidays to their temples with the idea of inducing them to take care of church matters, in the same way this free and democratic country calls its citizens, on this festive day, to celebrate and to reflect on the problems most important to its citizens. Moderate discipline, moderate excitement, will harm nobody.

    We Bohemians, being citizens of this free country, have very much neglected our education. All people, who came to this country soon after the Civil War, have constantly met with memories of the war and have heard every year, repeated tales about the two hostile parties, their fights, bloodshed and courageous deeds. They were repeatedly warned, that the 3same conditions can return again, because one political party, the Democratic, is watching for the moment when the other party, the Republican, will shut their vigilant eye, and then they will rise, unite with the Democrats of the South and establish slavery again, they will then separate themselves from the Union and start some kind of empire.

    The new Bohemian citizens were compelled to listen, all the time, to this kind of prating and to read in their newspapers the same thing. No wonder they believed in all of this as certain truth, the experienced politicians who published it had much practice in political sagacity.

    4

    This kind of bug-bearing originated in crazed brains and rammed into the thoughts of the Bohemians. Everyone who had intentions of becoming an American patriot was obliged to believe in it, and he who ridiculed it was called a traitor to the government and to the people, a slave-dealer who favored slavery.

    It is no wonder, that the new Bohemian immigrants were afraid to accept the great privilege of becoming American citizens. They refused to take first citizens papers, they despised citizenship.

    They were scared, that when the big war would start, which was constantly probable in their minds, they would be compelled to serve in the Army 5and would suffer worse hardships than under the military Austrian scourge. Single or married, with or without children, they would all go into the army-service. That is why they did not want to listen to citizenship talk and, rather, reported from time to time to the Austrian Consul to be protected from this supposed future war.

    The result was that many years after the Civil War, when the Bohemian immigration increased to such a degree, that in some settlements they could be decisive in the elections, there was only a small number of Bohemian citizens who were eligible as voters and they were not able to achieve anything.

    6

    Those times have gone. The foolish heads were forced to withdraw from public life, because a more clarified conception started to invade the frightened Bohemian communities.

    The Bohemians in the cities and villages started to recognize that they were detoured from the right way. They realized that they had been unduly scared and cheated, and that they had suffered great damage. They started to comprehend what was to their advantage. They applied for citizenship papers. They started to make use of their citizenship rights, in many instances very successfully. It was impossible to make good all at once. However, the activity of the Bohemians in public life, in all the states, where they have large communities, in the last few years has been very progressive and hopeful.

    7

    Liberty can not exist in a country, where the government is not in the hands of the people. It means that when single citizens have not liberty, they are not in a position to partake equally in governmental affairs.

    We must observe with pleasure the social life of our Bohemian people in this country, our new fatherland, and our power should be used principally for this country's benefit and for the progress of ourselves and our children. We must admire the eager work of our numerous Bohemian newspapers and contribute to their growth.

    We must see how honest, independent and incorruptible they are. We must keep a vigilant eye on these virtues since they are generally very neglected in the publications of other nationalities.

    8

    In larger communities it often happens that before important elections some benefactor of the Bohemian people appears who buys votes for certain office-chasers. Our Bohemian citizens know very well such miserable creatures and are no longer paying attention to them.

    Bohemians in public offices, such as county and state, is no longer a rarity, and proves the enlightenment of Bohemian voters and the ardor, which they are willing to throw in their political obligations.

    The Bohemians are using much time and diligence for pre-election and election activities and they are really happy when Bohemian candidates are elected, and never show their jealousy towards elected countrymen.

    9

    It is a common event for Bohemians to appoint as candidates their most capable and trustworthy countrymen, who are supported even by the voters of other nationalities. This support is not on the basis of common nationality, but on the basis of capability and good reputation.

    Political independence between our Bohemians has been developed lately to a very high point; there is now only an insignificant minority, that is able to hesitate in their belonging to the one or the other party, or in obeying blindly the orders of political bosses, who carry on without principle. Even though all these revelations are very consoling, we should be aware that there is much work left still to be accomplished.

    10

    Let us continue our work, let us be civilized in our civil duties, let us proceed collectively and protect our rights, and we will succeed in providing more and more freedom for ourselves and for our children, and a complete acknowledgement to the American government and its population.

    Today is the Fourth of July and the American people celebrate the anniversary of the Foundation and Proclamation of Independence. The experts in the history of the United States have ...

    Bohemian
    III B 3 a, II B 2 d 1, III B 1, III A, III H, I F 4, I C, I G, I J
  • Svornost -- July 09, 1883
    In Memory of Jan Hus.

    Saturday, July 7, the memory of Jan Hus was solemnly celebrated in the Pilzen Sokol Hall. As a start there was shown a dramatic play by J. Kaj. Tyl, entitled "Jan Hus" presented very successfully. The main characters were in the hands of experienced ameteurs: Sophie, wife of King Vaclav IV, was played by Mrs. H. Stejskal; the part of Marketa, Hus' mother, was presented by Mrs. M. Vaskova; Jan Hus by F. B. Zdrubek; Jan Zizka by A. Pregler; Petro Angelo, Cardinal and Pope's delegate, was played by Jos. Zak. All these amateurs were well-known as dramatically experienced.

    Strange as it may seem, the editors of Svornost were partaking in the play and each was very busy with the interpretation of his part in the drama - as Zikmund, the German Emperor; the Roman Catholic Pope, Jan XXIII, the Archbishop of Praha, and consequently, all our editors condemned Jan Hus, portrayed by the chief editor, F. B. Zdrubek.

    It is so impossible for us to give the correct details or the real criticism of the play because every one of the editors was so absorbed with his own 2part that is was simply impossible for him to observe critically the interpretation of other actors and it is not our wish to praise ourselves. The hall was over-filled. All intelligent Bohemians were present; we don't know what had attracted the public more - the drama or the editors of Svornost.

    The second part of the celebration, the dance, finished late in the night, will be remembered for a long time by the countrymen.

    Saturday, July 7, the memory of Jan Hus was solemnly celebrated in the Pilzen Sokol Hall. As a start there was shown a dramatic play by J. Kaj. Tyl, entitled ...

    Bohemian
    III B 3 a, II B 1 c 1, IV
  • Svornost -- June 06, 1890
    Participation in Public Affairs

    Svornost has been urging our countryman for over a long period of time, to be present and take part in all public ceremonies and celebrations, which the American people are holding--whether it is a celebration in memorial of some famous American, or some other national celebration. Participation of our people can only have beneficial results. It is not long since the English papers, unable to find any other faults, complained and with reason, that we Bohemians are extremely clannish, that we remain within our own narrow circle, tending to create a separate Bohemian Community.

    We undertook it as an obligation upon ourselves at that time, to work toward that end, so that public opinion of us Bohemians should change; therefore we urged our Lodges to take a brotherly interest in all public celebrations, which are participated in by other nationalities such as German, Scandinavians, etc., at the same time, however, we urged our countrymen to take care that their public appearances were dignified, made a good impression and encouraged respect.

    2

    It is true, that some kind of street parade, will not serve to redeem our nationality regardless of how many of our people might participate, but every sincere Bohemian would much rather read about the good impression made by the Bohemians participating, than the continual repetition of the charge that we are trying to establish a sort of special nationality, avoiding all contact with public life.

    Svornost has been urging our countryman for over a long period of time, to be present and take part in all public ceremonies and celebrations, which the American people are ...

    Bohemian
    III A, III B 3 a, I C
  • Svornost -- July 07, 1890
    Jan Hus

    Chicago Bohemians consecrated a day in Bohemian history, a day of fraternization in memory of the great martyr, Jan Hus. This year exercises were arranged in three separate local places. In the "Tel. Jed. Sokol" hall (Gymnastic Union Sokol) there was given a dramatized version of "Jan Hus". The attendance was quite satisfactory. Yesterday there was arranged a special celebration which was participated in by many of our people, there-by making it known, that they respect their great leaders suach as Jan Hus was. The speakers for the occasion were Fr. Zdrubek, K. Stulik and J.R. Jicinsky.

    There was also held a celebration at the "Cesko Anglicke Svob. Skole" (Bohemian-English Liberal School) on 18th Street yesterday afternnon. The attendance here was quite considerable and the result morally splendid of course. In the evening there was a shortened version of the "Jan Hus" Drama and this was received by those present with pleasure.

    There was also a celebration held at the Bohemian School, "Lad. Klacel" on Leavitt Street. Here also the participating public was numerous. Mr. F.B. Pecka, 2was the speaker for the ceremonies. This year's honoring of the memory of Master "Jan Hus" was much more observed than in previous years, and "Tel. Jed. Sokol" (Gymnastic Union Sokol) and the committee for the erection of a "Hus" memorial, as well as the "Ctenarsky" Spolek (Literary) Club can well be satisfied with the results.

    Chicago Bohemians consecrated a day in Bohemian history, a day of fraternization in memory of the great martyr, Jan Hus. This year exercises were arranged in three separate local places. ...

    Bohemian
    III B 3 a, III B 3 b, II B 2 f, III C, IV
  • Svornost -- November 10, 1890
    White Mountain Memorial.

    Tel. Jed. Sokol (Gymnastic Union Sokol) and Svob. Obec (Republic) arranged a joint celebration in memorial of the unfortunate battle of White Mountain, last Saturday. Although it rained all day and the evening was equally unfavorable, the public arrived at the hall in sufficient numbers, and the celebration itself was very dignified. It was especially pleasing that our young people were in attendance in such numbers; this circumstance proves, that the White Mountain Tortures Memorial has become a praiseworthy custom with us, that our people remember the sad defeats as well as the glorious deeds of our ancestors and value their memory.

    Music for the occasion was furnished by Kalec's band. There were several speakers. Later, by means of a slide-lantern, various scends and portraits of Bohemian leaders of the Husite period, were shown.

    Tel. Jed. Sokol (Gymnastic Union Sokol) and Svob. Obec (Republic) arranged a joint celebration in memorial of the unfortunate battle of White Mountain, last Saturday. Although it rained all day ...

    Bohemian
    III B 3 a, II B 3
  • Svornost -- June 01, 1891
    May Ceremonials on Bohemian Cemetery.

    Today we can call the grave decorating ceremonies on the Bohemian National Cemetery a national May celebration.

    Our Bohemian people meet every year on the 30th day of May in this holy place to pay homage to the memory of our departed countrymen, who took up arms in defense of the Union and to further encourage sound activity in the national field.

    Yesterday's celebration was attended by such a large number of Bohemians, that it was necessary to dispatch two trains for the accomodation of the visitors.

    When the first shots in defense of this Union of ours were heard, it was again the inflamable heart of the Slavic race, which answered and hundreds of Bohemians took up arms in defense of the freedom of this land. We repeat once more that judging from the many laudatory notices here and there, the May celebration hereafter will be our most popular national celebration.

    2

    May 30th will be dedicated to the visiting of the National Cemetery and we expect the attendance to be even greater next year.

    Today we can call the grave decorating ceremonies on the Bohemian National Cemetery a national May celebration. Our Bohemian people meet every year on the 30th day of May in ...

    Bohemian
    III B 3 a, III D, III C, I G
  • Svornost -- March 28, 1892
    J. A. Komensky Memorial Celebration

    Today it is three hundred years since the birth of Jan Amos Komensky. Who was Komensky? What did he do, that all civilized nations celebrate his memory, that with great respect they speak his name? Komensky was the teacher of all teachers. He knew that the foundation of happiness of all people began in the good upbringing of youth, and all his efforts were concentrated on this objective. Chicago Bohemians are celebrating his distinguished memory at the Music Hall, today. We take it for granted that it is not necessary to remind Bohemians as to their duty. Whoever claims to be a sincere Bohemian will overcome all obstacles which may stand in his way, in order to be present at today's celebration.

    Let no one use as an excuse, that everything spoken about Komensky is already generally known, a large attendance of Bohemians will have a very important meaning. We continually pride ourselves on our liberality, we continually pride ourselves on our Bohemianism, every little while we are showing to Americans of what meritorious masters the Bohemian nation can boast. So today we are to prove that we not only boast of these masters but that we know how to respect their memory with dignity.

    2

    Tonight we will find out all the Bohemians who are ready to prove these facts, and who they are who only talk.

    We expect that our entire intelligentsia will make a rendezvous of Music Hall, and that what strangers have to say about the Bohemian people and the great sons will be carefully followed.

    The celebration will commence at eight o'clock sharp, and it would be quite proper for the public to be in the respective seats earlier that there will be no interruptions made by late comers after the program has started.

    The celebration will be opened by the Chairman of the Committee, Mr. Matousek, after which the eminent organist, Mr. Falk, will render a ceremonial choral.Mr. Jos. Cermak will deliver the prologue and following him Mr. Vickers will appear, and describe the period of the decline of the Bohemian nation.

    Following Mr. Vickers will be the principal speaker of the evening, Mr. Donnelly, 3who will speak on the influence of Komensky. Mr. Donnelly is known as a highly educated man and an extraordinary speaker and we are certain that the Committee's choice will prove to be a good one.

    All necessary arrangements have been made and it now depends only on the Bohemian public to likewise attend in full number, and we believe it will do so.

    Today it is three hundred years since the birth of Jan Amos Komensky. Who was Komensky? What did he do, that all civilized nations celebrate his memory, that with great ...

    Bohemian
    III B 3 a