The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Svornost -- September 16, 1884
    How the Americans Care for Chicago's Bohemians. We Are Infamous Heathens According to an American Missionary Society.

    EDITORIAL: There exists in our city an American missionary society. It published, not long ago, its first annual statement called, "First annual report of the Chicago City Missionary Society." This booklet has twenty pages with, at least, twenty infamous lies and calumnies about the Bohemians in Chicago. We do not like this kind of slander, and so much the less when it comes from the mouth of Ecclasiastical zealots, who boast that they are fighting evil with truth. We hope, anyhow, that the local public will be informed how our nationality has been unjustly offended, and what kind of crooked calumnies are spread among the religious masses about us. We must assert that their efforts are connected rather 2with the devil, than with God.

    On page 6 of this annual report, is given, by the superintendent of the missionary society, J. C. Armstrong, the first report on the Bohemians.

    "In the Lumbermen's Miesion, founded for workers of lumber-yards, a new field is opened for our society. This mission is located at the corner of 19th and Center Streets. In this district the religious services are held in French, German, Norwegian and English. One day in a week should be devoted to the Bohemians. A large number of Bohemians separated from the Catholic church have built in the neighborhood a beautiful infidel temple. This is the same spot where, in 1876, occured the revolt, and there have been, until now, elements there which played with dynamite. Those are the men, who are not afraid of God and do not care for the rights of other fellow human beings. It will be much cheaper, wiser and safer to go among them with the gospel, than to let them come to us with sword and fire. Our problem is to save them from eternal damnation, these desperate individuals who are connected with the vice of our city. This sacred mission is given to us, 3and what will be the answer to Him, who has sent us?"

    All that has been cited above is an infamous lie and malicious slander of the whole Bohemian community in this district and of the National Hall of the C.S.P.S. (Czechoslovak Benevolent Society), and of all the workingmen, who feed and fatten the churchmen. They lie when they say that the revolt of the workingmen, in 1877, started in National Hall and that National Hall is a seat of the so much feared dynamite throwers.

    It is further an absolute lie that Bohemians frequenting this hall, have no fear of God or consideration for their fellow human beings. All those societies, which have meetings in this hall, have the same mutual problems of encouraging fraternity amongst humans and of furnishing financial help to the needy. They are not, as the missionary report says, a bunch of desperados, connected with the city's worst element, whose sole purpose is crime. It is incredible how a superintendent of a 4missionary society is able to release such infamous lies from his devilish throat. His mouth anointed with sacred oils, Christ's blood and prayers, should be clean and veracious. How can he dare to bring the Gospel to these defamed and slandered Bohemian people, to preach his American morality with all this Pharisaism, thievery and knavery and to wish to convert them to his faith, a faith that has originated from the devil, himself.

    This superintendent's devilish mouth should not spread lies about his fellow-men, whom he does not know, and never has associated with. He believes only in spreading vile calumnies. He mixes christianity in his devilish saliva and believes that no one will know the difference. In this way he strives to poison our people and corrupt them to his level.

    The Chairman of the missionary society, Mr. C. F. Gates, a missionary himself, expresses a still worse opinion on the Bohemians living in this district. He writes on page 10, 5as follows: "You have heard about the committee organized by us for the purpose of establishing a McLeane Mission, called the "Lumbermen's Mission, at 683 Centre Ave. The committee's task was to find out the best ways to win for salvation the Bohemians, who are populating this district very densely. There is nothing done. We can see swarms of children running wild in the streets. We can see crowds of men leaving their dwellings and going to the meetings, to listen to the instigative speeches of the communistic and socialistic leaders. The only things that they learn at these meetings is to fight against God and the Church, against the law of possession, against the family's rules and social connections. When we consider, that their votes in the elections have the same worth as ours, we will understand the big value of our undertaking to penetrate those crowds with the light of the Holy Gospel.

    If we wish to be saved ourselves, we must try to save our children and in the name of our Master, under whose banner we are marching. We must walk through all 6the side streets of our city seeking for the lost ones, to save them with God's help.

    Brothers, why does God allow all those people from Bohemia, Italy, Germany, Holland, Norway, Denemark, England, Ireland, Holland, China and Japan to come independently, instead of delivering them straight into our hands so that we can show them the value and power of the Christian faith, as a developer of their body, morals and soul? It is a very expensive problem to send the missionaries to the remote countries, but when God is sending those pagans to our own door, we should seize the work in our own hands and we will not regret this at the day of judgment.

    As compensation for our missionary work we will have flocks of devoted men and women, who will go everywhere and distribute the bread of life and God's teaching. We need money for this purpose, we need money to change saloons into churches, and to decrease crime. If we had money to do this we would not need a big police force 7to keep order and we would save much money in this way.

    From these few words it is easy to see that the Chairman of the missionary society looks at the Bohemians of the 6th ward as heathens and abases them before the entire religious community. The whole prestige of the Bohemians being destroyed, the missionaries in their devilish hypocrisy will show their mercy and, collecting money from the rich Americans, will start to convert those uncultured, ignorant Bohemians from paganism. They would make out of us sly thieves and impostors, of the type that are always recruited from American clergymen. We read, almost every day in the newspapers, that they hang themselves, cut their throats, that some of them are put in jails, and some of them run away with their spoils to Canada, stolen money, collected through their people's faith in the Holy Gospel. Should the Bohemians be the same kind of pious Christians, should they deprive themselves of their honesty, good hearts, good name and model themselves after the American brothers.

    8

    You Pharisaic creatures come among these so called pagan Bohemians and they will teach you honesty, Christian love, toleration, humanity morality, temperance, and justice. You do not need to teach Bohemians these virtues, but rather you can learn these virtues from them, because all that you know now is the vices of crime, shame and infamy - even if you pray and stay in churches. We have recognized your infamy and this deterred us from attending your churches and services, which allow such thieves, impostors and libertines to be seen and honored as holy men; holy men that despise poor, honest workingmen; holy men, who, nevertheless, are willing to save these workingmen from paganism.

    You American Pharisees, who are hiding your vice and knavery in places that are meant for prayers, go among the Bohemians and learn how to pray simply but sincerely. If there was a country, which has had religion and may be too much of it, such a country was Bohemia, and starting with the middle ages Bohemia has been floded with religious teachings, religious practices, religious propaganda, and bloodshed for religion. The Bohemians have outgrown all that 9foolishness and they are not so low as to let themselves be the victims of your religion that attempts to implant devilishness into the hearts of our people. The Bohemians are outspoken. They will tell you all that they have in their hearts. Through the experience of many centuries the Bohemians have abandoned your type of religious practices, and even if you had whole regiments of missionaries sent into their midst these missionaries would not be able to change their human morals and doctrine of truth. These Bohemians would stand firm, like a wall that was once formed centuries ago by the Hussites, armed with clubs similar to those which were used to split the heads of the black monks, who came to Bohemia to preach hypocrisy, dishonesty and immorality, ready to do the same to these modern black monks of the missions.

    If these missionaries will come to the Bohemians to learn from them religion, morality and honesty, they will be welcome, but should they come with the intention to destroy the prosperity of our people, to insult us, to humiliate us unjustly, and then to rehabilitate us later, their enterprise would not pay at all.

    10

    I propose to the members of the missionary society, who intend to ensnare these ignorant Bohemians for the Methodist church on 19th Street that they explain and interpret to their representatives, how the Bohemians feel about it.

    They should enlighten their American representatives on how to talk with Bohemians. It is their duty to reprimand those Pharisaic slanders, and to revolk these wicked chairmen and superintendents of the mission, all of whom have thrown calumnies at us.

    In the future they should not write about the Bohemians, before they mingle with the Bohemians, and become acquainted with them. Further, they should never lie so unpardonably, and offend people that endeavor to build noble projects for the future.

    We are happy that Dr. Adam will visit Chicago in the near future. He knows 11us, loves us, protects us, and he will certainly take care, that all these slanders thrown on Bohemians by the religious fanatics be revoked and the good name of the Bohemians restored. The offended morality and feelings of the good and organized Bohemians in Chicago may instigate, unnecessarily, a justifiable revenge.

    The action of the Chicago Missionary Society, and of all those rascals who throw different calumnies on Bohemians in Chicago, is decidedly criminal in nature.

    EDITORIAL: There exists in our city an American missionary society. It published, not long ago, its first annual statement called, "First annual report of the Chicago City Missionary Society." This ...

    Bohemian
    I C, III C, I B 4, II D 6, II B 2 d 2
  • Svornost -- June 06, 1892
    Sokol "Cechie"

    The Gymnastic Union Sokol "Cechie" held a celebration yesterday. The event was the laying of the cornerstone of its building which is being erected on Emma Street. A national Bohemian hall, which would not only be the center of the Bohemian element in that part of the city, but also a nationalistic inspiration, had become a necessity on the north-west side. Sokol "Cechie", which has always stood at the fore-front of nationalistic endeavors, took the first step and will build this hall.

    It now remains for the Bohemians living in that part of the city to give "Cechie" all the support possible, in order to help it carry the heavy burden, which it has imposed upon itself. The hall will not be the exclusive property of "Cechie" but will belong to the entire Bohemian element, and it is expected that all Bohemian Lodges will make it their headquarters, that they will work harmoniously hand in hand so that the hall will truly become the centre of all Bohemian elements.

    The Gymnastic Union Sokol "Cechie" held a celebration yesterday. The event was the laying of the cornerstone of its building which is being erected on Emma Street. A national Bohemian ...

    Bohemian
    II B 3, II B 1 c 3, II D 6, III A
  • Denní Hlasatel -- March 09, 1903
    Bohemian California.

    Today there is no need to doubt, that this section of our city is rapidly becoming one of the best. It serves only as an honor to us Bohemians that it is settled only by our countrymen. The lively building movement, which has been going on here, is a clear indication that very soon there will not be in Bohemian California a single street, where vacant building sites can be found.

    Our countrymen in California bring with them a lively social movement. We Bohemians found out long ago, that in union there is strength. In Bohemian California they do not remain behind, but on the contrary by established custom, they surpass the countrymen settled in other sections. Against the small number of social entertainment organizations, there are in California an unusually great number of those whose ranks boast a large number of intelligent members. The entertainments and meetings of these are usually held in the Sokol Chicago Building on Kedzie Avenue. The lodge rooms and likewise the main auditorium, which in addition to theatricals, balls, 2etc., also serves as a gymnasium for the Sokols, are beautifully arranged, however it is possible to fear that in a short time it will be too small.

    To be sure those, who first conceived the idea of building a Bohemian hall, never had any idea that California would grow so large in such a short time. This matter should be given serious consideration. It would be an easy matter to enlarge this hall. It would even be possible to build an addition extending all the way to the sidewalk. In this manner the school premises of the "Vojta Naprstek" would in no way be injured, because the first grade rooms are already too small to accommodate the mass of pupils, and it will be necessary to seek larger quarters for it.

    Today there is no need to doubt, that this section of our city is rapidly becoming one of the best. It serves only as an honor to us Bohemians that ...

    Bohemian
    III A, II D 6, II B 2 f
  • Denní Hlasatel -- February 27, 1906
    The Bohemian-Catholic Hall Sponsors

    P.9--The minutes of the meeting held on January 3, 1906 by the Sponsors of the Bohemian-Catholic hall. The meeting was brought to order by brother chairman V. Beranek at the regular time, with a prayer and in the presence of all officers and a large attendance of representatives. The minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved without change. The excuse of representative brother, Jos. Kalina, that he is ill and unable to attend, was accepted. The committee on arrangements for the sponsors' fair made a report, in which it announced, that it had everything duly arranged and provided for. The report was accepted. After that a sub-committee, for the fair, was elected. Those elected were: Mat. Tintera and Fr. Capek, to operate the wheels-of-fortune; Jos. Mrazek and V. Rezab, cashiers at the bar; Ant. Brychta and Vac. Lhotak, "Under the Green" Vac. Hessler, to assist at the wheel. The ladies accepted to represent the committee for candy and sweets. Other committees are to be selected from the members of the society. Vac. Beranek and Vac. Krizek were appointed as representatives of the Sponsors, to attend a meeting of St. Oldrich, court of Catholic Foresters, because the court desired some form of oral explanation.

    2

    The receipts of this meeting amounted to $22.50, from Jos. Mrazek, for chance-tickets sold. Disbursements none. The treasurer has on hand $36.76. There being no further business to transact, the chairman brought the meeting to a close with a prayer.

    V. Krizek, Secretary.

    P.9--The minutes of the meeting held on January 3, 1906 by the Sponsors of the Bohemian-Catholic hall. The meeting was brought to order by brother chairman V. Beranek at the ...

    Bohemian
    II D 6, III C
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 03, 1911
    (No headline)

    Josef Prasek, 11, son of Mr. Vojtech Prasek of Chicago, on his way from Bohemia to his father's home here was detained on Ellis Island for an entire week. He was released after Reverend Vanek, Chicago, appealed to the director of the Czech immigrant home, Mr. Koukol, who then took care of the boy. About 2,000 persons are now detained on Ellis Island, some for several days, before they are turned over to their relatives or friends.

    Josef Prasek, 11, son of Mr. Vojtech Prasek of Chicago, on his way from Bohemia to his father's home here was detained on Ellis Island for an entire week. He ...

    Bohemian
    III G, II D 6
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 20, 1911
    For a New School and a New Gymnasium

    Preparations for two buildings in "Czech California" are being pushed with great vigor for the edifices are destined to play an important part in the life of the Czech population of the district. One is the school, Vojta Naprsteck, on 26th and Homan ave., the other the gymnasium of the Sokol Havlicek, on Lawndale ave., near 26th st.

    The old school has been in need of a building for a long time, to centralize its activities and to keep the classes under one roof, again, the old gymnasium has proved utterly inadequate for the accommodation of the ever increasing numbers of the Sokol association, which began and prospered in the old locality, but now has outgrown its size. The two buildings will not only meet a pressing demand of the astoundingly thriving district, but will no doubt have a decorative effect as well.

    2

    The bids of the contractors for the school, will be opened Monday in the chambers of the Sokol Chicago gymnastic society. An outlay of $45,000 was originally planned; the sum was lowered to $25,000, as some of the leaders, Mr. Richard Dusil and a few others excepted, were afraid to go too deep into debt. The drawings were worked out in the offices of Architect Jan Klucina. They are generally acknowledged as meeting the requirements of usefulness and beauty.

    The school has now six classes, four on Kedzie ave., and two on Homan ave.; the six classes in the new building are to accommodate one hundred children. The building committee will be composed of Mr. Richard Dusil, president, Mr. Adolph Rys, Mrs. Marie Stepanek, and Mr. J. F. Fisher; the construction will be started toward the end of March.

    The site for the gymnasium is valued at $3,500. The plans were prepared in the offices of architects Ludvik Novy & Son. The cost of the building 3is to be $35,000, which will be contributed in shares. The gymnastic society has two hundred male members, eighty members in the women's section and about 150 members in the junior division. The preliminary work, propaganda and support, as well as the actual erection, are in the hands of a committee of twelve Sokols whose names follow: Velan, Jakoubek, Zeman, Prochazka, Benes, Kier, Krametbauer, Cermak, Zeman, Raska, Vlsen, and Martinek.

    Preparations for two buildings in "Czech California" are being pushed with great vigor for the edifices are destined to play an important part in the life of the Czech population ...

    Bohemian
    I A 2 a, I A 2 b, III B 2, II B 3, II D 6
  • Denní Hlasatel -- February 01, 1911
    Construction to Begin In Yesterday's Annual Meeting of the Patronage of the Vojta Naprstek School it was Decided That the Directors Should Award the Building Contracts

    One of the best attended meetings of the Vojta Naprstek school patronage was held last evening in the upper hall of Sokol Chicago, on Kedzie Av. The reasons for the large attendance of the meeting were very weighty, not only because it was the annual meeting and election of officers was on the program, but because at this meeting, it was to be definitely decided as to when construction of the new school at 25th St. and Homan Av. is to be commenced.

    2

    The meeting was called to order, at eight o'clock in the evening, by the chairman, Mr. R. Dusil. The secretary Mr. Otcovsky, read the minutes of the previous meeting, which were accepted as read. Bills were ordered paid and of the communications read, the one from the Association of Liberal (Free Thought) Schools was noted by the proper officers. The secretary then read the report of the committee for the New Year's Day celebration, in which he announced, that the receipts on that occasion amounted to $228.16 with disbursements of $113.10, resulting in a net profit of $115.06. This report was accepted and thanks voted to the committee. Mrs. Mazacova, for the Dobrocinny Krouzek Kalifornskych Dam (California Ladies Benevolent Circle), announced they are turning over for the benefit of the school, $300.00 from the proceeds of the masquerade 3ball, given by them, and any further profit realized will be included in the final report. The women were thanked for such profitable work and the gift was accepted with expressions of gratitude. Then followed the reading of the names of newly elected delegates and of the amounts of the contributions sent in by various lodges. All newly elected delegates were then welcomed by the chairman.

    The secretary of the Board of Directors Mr. J. A. Jurena, then read a report of the activities of that body, pointing out, that all preparations for building have been completed and it is now up to the delegates to decide when construction of the new school shall start. From the report given by Mr. Jurena, we find the total assets of the Patronage amount to 4$11,172.76, of which $11,100.00 is loaned on notes, leaving a balance of $72.76 with the treasurer. Because the largest part of the loaned amount is with the Kedzie Building & Loan Association, a summary of about one hundred paid-up shares with that society was also read. Mention also was made of directors' meetings, where the bids of various contractors were discussed. The relatively low bids were given consideration and the directors strove to recommend Bohemian firms exclusively. According to the bids approved and received, the cost of construction will be about $25,011, and out of this sum, Mr. Jurena, announced for the directors, there is a possibility of saving about a hundred dollars. The report was accepted and then other matters of the evening were taken up.

    5

    The chairman Mr. Dusil, made a summarized report of the activities of the past year, referring to the dispute about the construction of a building to cost more than $20,000. He gave the reasons why he protested against the construction of so expensive a building. This, of course, caused a short debate. Mr. V. Roubal, a former member of the Board of Directors, replied to the chairman's protest. However, at the request of the majority of those present that old wounds be not reopened, the debate ceased and the matter of bonds for the officers was taken up. Attention was called to the fact that the secretary of the Board of Directors was bonded for only $1,000, as against a bond of $5,000, for the bookkeeper, although all money passed through the hands of the former and not the latter. Consequently, according 6to a motion made and carried, the bond of the secretary will be raised to $5,000, and the bookkeeper's reduced to $1,000. The bond of the chairman, $2,000, and that of the treasurer, $10,000, will remain as here-to-fore. With the completion of this matter, the most important business of the evening was taken up, namely, the election of directors. To the Board of Directors, which consists of nine members the following named persons were elected: Messrs. Dusil, Rys, Topinka, Otcovsky, Zednik, Sus, Stepanek and Mmes. Hrychova and Mazacova. Mr. Dusil was elected president. Mrs. Brychtova was named vice-president. Mrs. Stepanek was elected secretary. Mrs. Kar. Janecek was reelected bookkeeper and Mr. J. A. Jurena was reelected treasurer. The arrangement committee was appointed by the chairman 7and is composed of Messrs., Rus, Zeman, and Mmes. Benes, Fencl and Rak. The auditing committee also was named by the chairman as follows: Mrs. Soucek, Mr. Vasak and Mr. D. Novak. Mr. Topinka and Mrs. Brychtova were elected delegates to the Association of Liberal (Free Thought) Schools.

    with this, the elections came to an end and on the motion of Mr. Topinka, it was decided by vote to begin building at once, the awarding of contracts to be left to the decision of the directors. This body will hold its meeting on Monday, at which time contracts will be signed and soon after that construction will begin. The new building of the Vojta Naprstek 8School, upon its completion and dedication, will surely be the pride of all progressive Chicago Bohemians and those of Ceska Californie (Bohemian California) in particular. After the reading of the receipts of the evening $279.06, and disbursements of $157.25, the meeting was adjourned at a late hour.

    One of the best attended meetings of the Vojta Naprstek school patronage was held last evening in the upper hall of Sokol Chicago, on Kedzie Av. The reasons for the ...

    Bohemian
    I A 2 a, II B 2 f, I D 1 a, III B 2, II D 6, III A
  • Denní Hlasatel -- June 12, 1911
    The Cornerstone of the Sokol Chicago Hall Addition Laid in a Festive Manner

    It was a significant and grand celebration which was held yesterday afternoon in our Bohemian California. The cornerstone of the addition to the hall of one of the most active sokol Societies of America, Sokol Chicago, on Kedzie Avenue and Twenty-fourth Street, was laid. Sokol Chicago plays an important part in the social life and educational activities in Bohemian California. For that reason, it was not strange that on this significant occasion the entire Bohemian quarter was on its feet, that an enthusiastic holiday mood prevailed, that wherever a person looked, it was apparent that something significant was going on.

    The celebration began shortly after noon when the various sokol societies and delegates of other patriotic bodies began to assemble at Twenty-third and Spaulding Streets so as to take part in a parade. This was assembled 2around two P. M., and proceeded to the Sokol Chicago Hall.

    The parade, which had a dignified appearance, moved along Twenty-fifth Street to Kedzie Avenue, and then to the building site. There it spread out before the Sokol Chicago building, to which two large wings are being added, and here the band played "Kde Domev[gap]uj? after which Mr. Roubal came forward and delivered an appropriate speech, calling attention to the significance of the occasion. The cornerstone of the present building of Sokol Chicago was laid in the year 1899. At that time Lohemian California was just in its iafaney. Sokol Chicago, upon its organsation, had only sixty-seven members, but it went to work energetically and perfermend a task, of which it can be groud. Erecting a splendid building, it brought a gigantic but upon itself. Even its friends doubtel that it gould be able to for the hall. Sokol Chicago paid off the debt within eight years, Which is the best proof of the zealousness with which it worked. After paying for the hall, its 3development in no way shackened, it continued to expand further, until it became evident a few years ago that not even that spacious hall would suffice for the full expansion of its powerful wings. The enlargement of the hall was beginning to be thought of, and now, finally, steps have been taken toward its accomplishment. Plans were made, and if success is met with according to these [plans], Sokol Chicago Hall will become one of the largest Bohemian national halls not only in Chicago, but in all America.

    After the cornerstone had been placed at the corner of the north wing, the parade was reassembled and proceeded to the Pilsen Park, where the festive program was continued. Dr. Rudis-Jicinsky, editor of Sokol Americky, of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, addressed those present, calling attention to the fact that the cornerstone of one of the largest Sokol buildings in America had been laid. He then spoke of the many sided activities which Sokol Chicago developed, as in the spiritual field so in physical development, 4dramatic art, and all knowledge, which tends toward the good and beautiful. He called attention to the great task which this society has taken upon itself, expressing the hope that the people will not forget it in its hard fight, but will support it, because Sokol Chicago is not working for its own good only, it is working for the good of the entire Bohemian public. The entire Bohemian public benefits from its activity. The speaker named all the sokol societies which participated in the celebration, and proclaimed, convincingly, that none of them would forsake Sokol Chicago, that none of them would withhold a helping hand in time of need.

    After a short intermission, various drills were performed under the direction of instructor Thomas Kocka. One hundred twenty-five girls performed calisthenics to the accompaniment of music. Then one hundred twentyfour boys performed calisthenics. Then followed thirty-two women sokols whose performance aroused general admiration. The program was concluded 5by a company of twenty-four sokols, who performed exercises on parallel bars and buck under the direction of Commander, Sokol Rudolph Langer. Exercises which will be performed in the competition at Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on July 4 were demonstrated.

    The Croatian singing society, Zora, arrived, even though somewhat late, and sang several beautiful songs under the direction of its choirmaster, Mr. Coufal.

    The celebration came to an end with a dance in the pavilion, at which the younger generation, after all the hardships of the day, "kicked up its heels."

    It was a significant and grand celebration which was held yesterday afternoon in our Bohemian California. The cornerstone of the addition to the hall of one of the most active ...

    Bohemian
    II D 1, III B 2, II B 3, II D 6
  • Denní Hlasatel -- June 23, 1911
    For the Future Generations Societies and Individuals, Who Contributed Something toward Sokol Chicago's New Hall, Are Assured That Tidings about Them Will Be Preserved for Future Descendants

    The building committee of Sokol Chicago has done everything possible to furnish Bohemian California with a gymnasium and hall that would satisfy all modern requirements. From plans, according to which the construction will be carried out, it is seen that it will be one of the finest Bohemian halls in America. Provisions will be made so that not only the Sokols will find it one of the best-equipped gymnasiums, but so that amateur players will have a stage which will enable them to suitably appear before the public. Other Bohemian lodges will also have headquarters in the building. Even the lodges with large memberships will be able to hold their meetings and satisfy all prescribed rituals there.

    2

    The interior fittings of the hall and lodge rooms will be luxurious and supplemented with dignity by the strong, joyful impression called forth by the enormous building.

    In brief, the Sokol Chicago Hall will be such that not only the Sokol, but all Bohemian California, all Bohemian Chicago, will be proud of it. It is an enormous undertaking and will cost about $45,000.

    Sokol Chicago does not have such great means but it is depending upon other Bohemian societies and our generous countrymen, who recognizing to what advantage and to what honor the new building will serve all Bohemian people, surely will not withhold their aid from so deserving and undertaking.

    This hall will become the focus of Bohemian life: it will become the center of our national efforts; in it sokols, amateurs, and societies will 3look after the preservation of our adolescents for the Bohemian people; it will cultivate Bohemian culture and the Bohemian language. Whoever is concerned about these things, let them give a helping hand towards their realization.

    A building, so sturdily constructed as the Sokol Chicago Hall will be, will bring the glory of the Bohemian name to future generations. In the cornerstone, which will be laid an June 26, the history, societies and individuals who acquired some merit in service for the Sokol building, will be preserved as future mementos of Sokol Chicago and the local Bohemian community. Those societies that would like to have their memorial notes placed in the cornerstone should not delay but should apply immediately. Everyone, be it an individual or a society, who contributes for the construction of the building will be entered on the memorial paper that will be placed in the cornerstone just before it is laid. Those who still wish to make a contribution may do so in the 4clothing establishment of Novak and Sebek at Twenty-second and Troy Streets. The office will be at this address during the entire period of construction.

    The building committee of Sokol Chicago has done everything possible to furnish Bohemian California with a gymnasium and hall that would satisfy all modern requirements. From plans, according to which ...

    Bohemian
    II D 6, I D 1 b, III B 2, II D 1, III E
  • Denní Hlasatel -- August 06, 1911
    New Building of Sokol Karel Havlicek (Summary)

    The article shows a reproduction of the original drawing of the building as it will appear at some future time when the organization's finances permit the completion of the building according to the plans finally adopted.

    This society was organized more than six years ago and the membership now consists of over two hundred men and eighty women. The plans for the new building were drawn up by the architect Mr. Novy and the estimate for its construction is $49,000. The society hesitated to contract so large a debt and it was decided to change the plans somewhat. Temporarily the right and left wings of the building will not be constructed. The cost of the building is thereby reduced to $35,000. The wings will be added when finances permit.

    The hall will measure 90 x 80 feet; the stage will be 38 feet wide and 220 feet deep. At the sides will be the cloak room, dressing room, toilets, barroom, kitchen, and living quarters for the caretaker. Everything will be modern.

    Contracts for the construction work were awarded as follows: masonry and brick work, to Frank Pitra for $12,800; carpenter work, Joseph Pastur for $6,300; iron work, M. J. Strnad & Son for $4,912; plumbing, water and gas, to Frank J. Tichy for $2,830; cornice work, to John Eiselt for $1,475; painting and varnishing,to Joseph Hosna for $375.

    The article carries a long list of organizations and individuals who purchased bonds of the building.

    The building committee has the following assets to its credit: on deposit with the "Budovcnost" Building and Loan Association $3,106. Loan on note of the Building & Loan Association $1,400. Cash on hand $626.25. Four lots on Lawndale Ave., $3,500. Private loan $3,350. Total $11,982.25.

    3

    Members of the Board of Directors are: Frank Vlach, president; Fr. Zeman, chairman building committee; R. Cermak, secretary building committee; J. Jakoubek, financial secretary; J. Matousek, treasurer; R. Krametbauer, J. Stech, J. Tuma, V. Velan, J. Raska, J. Smid, and F. Prochazka.

    The article shows a reproduction of the original drawing of the building as it will appear at some future time when the organization's finances permit the completion of the building ...

    Bohemian
    II D 6, III B 2