The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Svornost -- February 08, 1884
    Home for Forgotten People

    Last Wednesday there was held a meeting of the financial committee of the Home for Forgotten People. The treasurer's report is as follows: Income during the month of January, $1,105.34; expenses, $1,024.53; balance, $80.81. The Burov Mission took in during the same period of time $488.75, expended $251.30; balance, $237.45. The school department of the institution took in $375.65; expended $102; balance, $293.65. The total balance in the treasury consists of $611.91. The newly accepted inmates were 92 adults and 134 children; the released, 70 adults and 17 children. On Feb. 1st the institution lodged 139 people. The school of industry of the Burov Mission has 64 pupils.

    Last Wednesday there was held a meeting of the financial committee of the Home for Forgotten People. The treasurer's report is as follows: Income during the month of January, $1,105.34; ...

    Bohemian
    II D 10, II B 2 f, II D 4, II D 5
  • Denní Hlasatel -- April 11, 1901
    Bohemian Old Peoples Home and Orphanage.

    That the name of Bohemian immigrants in Chicago may be spoken of with respect when we shall have been for a long time turned back into ashes and dust, depends upon all of us. Everyone of us should work for monuments which will make known to our descendants that we really worked towards the alleviation of the suffering and grief of our countrymen who through unfortunate circumstances were driven upon the rocks where their vessel of happiness and of a satisfactory life was wrecked. By monuments we mean a "home" for our old people and an "orphanage" for Bohemian children. These are two undertakings for the early realization of which every Bohemian should zealously work. Every individual, every society, and every Bohemian club should remember to make collections at every opportunity for the "home"and for the "orphanage" and in this manner help build the most beautiful lasting monument for all of us in common.

    That the name of Bohemian immigrants in Chicago may be spoken of with respect when we shall have been for a long time turned back into ashes and dust, depends ...

    Bohemian
    II D 5, II D 4
  • Denní Hlasatel -- April 20, 1901
    The Old Peoples' Home

    Already there has been much complaint about the indifference of our citizens toward the "Home." These complaints were not, and are not, without substantiation. Everywhere, in everything, we see an almost staggering indifference to the undertaking, the importance and benevolence of which are generally recognized, and, which formerly was so enthusiastically and liberally supported. Early improvement is needed for this condition. There are smaller groups of other nationalities here, and they all have homes for their aged poor folk, their own hospitals and orphanages.

    We have been preparing over a period of years, for the foundation of a "Home," and now we are worse off in the matter than we were three or four years ago. We are drowsy and indifferent. How much patriotism, charity and generosity there formerly existed among us! How much money Bohemian Americans, especially Chicagoans, have sent to the old country in support of the undertakings and institutions of the national societies! How 2generously we have supported our countrymen, in the old country, whenever they were stricken by some elemental calamity! Now we care about nothing except the most diversified forms of amusement, and at the very most, we decide, at times, upon a manifestation of mutual hatred among ourselves, (between Liberals and Catholics.) On our national field almost all fruitful work has ceased. Almost nothing happens for this reason, however, there is so much more criticism undermining and tearing down. We do not consider this sad condition in our national life as permanent but we cherish the hope, that there will soon be a change for the better. The present lack of interest and dullness is probably only the result of former great drives. We needed a rest, and perhaps we have taken more of it than was really necessary, therefore, let us go to work. Let us remember that we have three undertakings which deserve our fullest support. They are: The "Home for the Aged." the "Orphanage," and the "Singing School for Children." Everyone should have the realization and success of these undertakings at heart, and work for at least one of them at each opportunity. Then, let our public also participate and we shall be able to expect the completion of at least one of our chief undertakings in a short time.

    Already there has been much complaint about the indifference of our citizens toward the "Home." These complaints were not, and are not, without substantiation. Everywhere, in everything, we see an ...

    Bohemian
    II D 5, II B 2 f, II D 4, III H, III C
  • Denní Hlasatel -- May 24, 1901
    The Old People's Home Near the Bohemian National Cemetery.

    The property of the well known citizen Anton Pregler was bought for it.

    The efforts of all countrymen in Chicago to have the home located near the outskirts of Chicago, so that it could be easily reached, were realized yesterday afternoon. The directors of the home, through their fully empowered representatives, Jan Pech and Jan Visko, arranged for the purchase of the property, belonging to the well known countryman Anton Pregler, which is located near the Bohemian National Cemetery.

    This change will surely be welcomed by every one with great satisfaction, as the Bensenville, Ill. site for the home, which was located in Du Page county, because of the great distance and bad travel connections did not please anyone. The directors of the home, in the belief, that if the site for the home were closer to Chicago, the entire undertaking would be looked upon more favorably, looked about for a suitable site.

    2

    Anton Pregler offered to sell his property for this purpose, several years ago, asking at that time $40,000, but as the price asked seemed to be too high, further discussion was held on the matter by the directors in private, until last Thursday, when the directors again began negotiating with Mr. Pregler. He was willing to sell his entire property to the directors of the home for $32,000, but was unwilling to accept as part payment the property which the home held in Bensenville, Ill. The directors of the home, however, did not allow this objection to defeat their purpose of purchasing a suitable site, and immediately sent Mr. Pech and Mr. Viska to negotiate with Mr. Pregler, It was finally agreed that Mr. Pregler would turn his property over to the home for $24,000, and in addition he was to receive the Bensenville property of the home, which is valued at about $9,000.

    Wednesday, a special meeting of the board of directors was called and it was decided, unanimously, to accept the offer and buy the property from Mr. Pregler.

    Yesterday the deal was closed, and according to it, Anton Pregler, together with his wife, turn their property over to the board of directors of the home and receive for it the home property in Bensenville and $24,000, of which $1,000, each $500, they donate toward the building funds of the home.

    3

    The directors of the home have on hand about $8000, so they need about $13,000 more in order to pay the required amount of the transaction and this they expect to borrow from the National Cemetery to which surely none of the representatives of that body will be opposed.

    The home will receive the Pregler property "as is" with the exception of the personal property of the seller.

    The change will assure the success of the home for all lodges and clubs and women's committees will again work with feverish activity, to hurry the final realization of the undertaking.

    The property of the well known citizen Anton Pregler was bought for it. The efforts of all countrymen in Chicago to have the home located near the outskirts of Chicago, ...

    Bohemian
    II D 5, III C, IV
  • Denní Hlasatel -- June 06, 1901
    Meeting of Bohemian National Cemetery Association.

    The minutes of the previous meeting were read and accepted as read.

    Yesterday's meeting of the Bohemian National Cemetery Association advanced the undertaking of the Old People's Home, when it was decided to loan the Directors of the Home, sufficient money to complete the purchase of the site which was selected.

    The Board of Directors of the Home in a letter, which was accompanied by the Directors, requested a loan of $15,000 from the National Cemetery for the purpose of paying for the newly purchased Pregler property. After a lengthy debate, which was participated in by various representatives, it was resolved to loan the money to the Board of Directors of the Home on a first mortgage, payable after 5 years, with 4 per cent interest. Accepted: 20 votes for, 5 against. In addition the Cemetery Association will purchase from the Home $5,500 worth of Bonds.

    The minutes of the previous meeting were read and accepted as read. Yesterday's meeting of the Bohemian National Cemetery Association advanced the undertaking of the Old People's Home, when it ...

    Bohemian
    III C, II D 5
  • Denní Hlasatel -- June 07, 1901
    The Old People's Home.

    A magnificent pavillion for our Old People's Home, in the beautiful neighborhood of the National Cemetery, a favorite place visited mostly by Bohemians, and therefore the most suitable, is already assured. The National Cemetery Association, in Wednesday's meeting, took such action as was expected by all reasonable countrymen. It resolved, by an overwhelming majority, to loan to the Home the necessary sum, to enable it to pay Mr. Pregler the purchase price of his property. In this manner relieving the Home of the necessity of seeking a loan from a bank or other financial institution, spending money while doing so and paying high interest rates. The National Cemetery will lose nothing by this, but will gain, because the increased favor of the public will be significant compensation for the slight difference in interest rates.

    2

    The money, which will be loaned, will be secured in safety by the property of the Home. The property of Mr. Pregler, which the Home will acquire, has a value of at least $60,000, and the National Cemetery Association will receive a first mortgage on this valuable property, for making the loan. It now remains for our public to earnestly endeavor to reduce the indebtedness of the Home, in order that our old people may in a few years be accommodated in a refuge, satisfying all human needs, in the healthful, cheerful and beautiful neighborhood, surrounding the National Cemetery. They should work toward this end as societies and as individuals. Every society among us ought to send a representative to the Home Board, it should be remembered to take up collections for the benefit of the Home, at all entertainments and picnics, the clear receipts of all entertainments should be donated in whole or in part to the treasury of the Home. In this manner we will 3benefit not only our aged and worn countrymen, but the entire nationality. We will have the respect of all reasoning people, when we shall have proven that we care for our aged people, and that we practice a true interest in, and a love for our fellowman.

    Whoever honors himself, receives honor from others. This applies to individuals as well as nationalities.

    A magnificent pavillion for our Old People's Home, in the beautiful neighborhood of the National Cemetery, a favorite place visited mostly by Bohemians, and therefore the most suitable, is already ...

    Bohemian
    II D 5, III C
  • Denní Hlasatel -- June 14, 1901
    The Home Takes Over Property.

    Yesterday afternoon, the Committee for the Bohemian Old People's Home, arrived at Mr. Pregler's place to take over the property. Mr. Pregler showed exceptional generosity to our humanitarian undertaking. He kept only his beloved personal collection, and turned over to the committee, everything else in the hostelry. The committee, which very carefully inventoried everything appraised the value of these articles, which Mr. Pregler left, at over $4,000. Mr. Pregler could have kept for himself very easily, articles valued at more than $1,000. Because he did not do so, he is deserving of full recognition by the Bohemian public. The Home received from him a collection of live animals, hundreds of rabbits and pigeons, thousands of trees, an ice-house full of ice, a large amount of hay and various machinery, rare flowers, dishes valued at several hundred dollars, bowling alleys in excellent conditions, etc.

    2

    Everything which Mr. Pregler called his own thus far, became the property of the Home yesterday. The committee which took over the property was composed of: Mrs. Sulove and Mrs. Liskove and Mr. Pech, Kacina, Minarik and Topinka. A manager for the property will be appointed as soon as possible and it is expected that the Bohemian public will visit the Home in large numbers and that it will support it in every way possible.

    Yesterday afternoon, the Committee for the Bohemian Old People's Home, arrived at Mr. Pregler's place to take over the property. Mr. Pregler showed exceptional generosity to our humanitarian undertaking. He ...

    Bohemian
    III C, II D 5
  • Chicago Tribune -- August 12, 1901
    Bohemian Old Settlers.

    Bohemian old settlers and their friends, 6,000 strong gathered at the grounds of the Home for Aged Bohemians at Irving Park yesterday at a picnic for the benefit of the home.

    Bohemian old settlers and their friends, 6,000 strong gathered at the grounds of the Home for Aged Bohemians at Irving Park yesterday at a picnic for the benefit of the ...

    Bohemian
    III B 2, II D 5
  • Denní Hlasatel -- December 27, 1901
    Mis-Used Telegram.

    Narod (Nation) served itself badly, when it made use of Kubelik's telegram to the Society of Bohemian journalists, in a clumsy attack upon the Old Peoples Home. Not only the liberal-minded, but the Roman Catholics as well, consider the Old Peoples Home a humanitarian undertaking deserving the support of denomination. All aged, forsaken, Bohemians will be given refuge in the Home without any question being raised, as to whether they belonged to a Catholic or a liberal-minded society. Bohemian Catholics know this, therefore, they charge Narod with wrong doing, in not only refusing to support the Home, but in injuring it at every opportunity. With its remarks on the occasion of Kubelik's telegram to the Bohemian journalists, Narod not only injured the Home, but the Society of Bohemian Journalists as well. From these remarks one would have to judge, that the Society of Bohemian Journalists takes upon itself the right to invite Kubelik to decide for whom he shall play, and that it is opposed to the interests of the Home. However, this is not so. The Society, of Bohemian Journalists merely offered its services to Kubelik in case he should be in need 2of any information, and they, at no time, had any idea of arranging some sort of welcoming ceremony, or of advising the artist, for which Society he should play.

    The Society of Bohemian Journalists, together with all honorable Bohemians, supports the Home and will continue to give it support.

    Narod (Nation) served itself badly, when it made use of Kubelik's telegram to the Society of Bohemian journalists, in a clumsy attack upon the Old Peoples Home. Not only the ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 d 2, II D 5, III C
  • Denní Hlasatel -- December 28, 1901
    Magnanimous Gift.

    The well known Bohemian brewing company, Atlas, did not neglect to make its customary monetary contribution, of considerable amount, for some honorable purpose. This year, as a Christmas gift, it donated to the Old Peoples Home the sum of $100, with the hope that this welfare institution should be host to the old people, who will seek and find refuge therein, in the near future. The above mentioned gift was delivered to the Home by Karl Vopicka, President of the Atlas Brewery and member of the Chicago School Board. The Board of Directors of the Home accepted the gift with great pleasure, and will not forget to give whole-hearted thanks, in an appropriate place and time,to the honorable donors whose ranks should grow more rapidly.

    The well known Bohemian brewing company, Atlas, did not neglect to make its customary monetary contribution, of considerable amount, for some honorable purpose. This year, as a Christmas gift, it ...

    Bohemian
    II D 5, II A 2, IV