The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Chicago Tribune -- February 09, 1880
    In Memory of John Huss

    In commemoration of John Huss, the great Bohemian, who had been burnt at the stake in the market place of the city of Constance for raising his voice against the corruption of the Popes and their clergy, there is a movement of many thousands of Bohemians. But the movement is not confined to Bohemia.

    As the Hussites of old left the confines of Bohemia and roamed all through the German Empire, so the modern Hussites have wandered far from home and found that freedom for which their brethren are struggling for in Bohemia, by becoming denizens and citizens of the United States. Here in Chicago 50,000 of them have found homes, and are fast acquiring American manners and language and good American dollars and neat homes. They are an industrious, thrifty people, clinging somewhat tenaciously to the customs and traditions of old Bohmeia, but nevertheless entering heart and soul into American citizenship.

    And here on the banks of Lake Michigan they now propose to commemorate in bronze the scene enacted on the banks of the Badensee four centuries ago. They will erect a monument to John Huss if they can get the permission of the West Park Board to place it in Douglas Park. They argue that monuments have been placed in other parks and 2that so far from disfiguring they have improved the appearance of the parks. If the Germans could erect a statue to Schiller, why should not the Bohemians be given place to build a monument to Huss? Douglas Park is near the Bohemian settlement in the city and is used by them more than any other park.

    Although there are not many wealthy men among them they mean to raise the money required for a fine monument by subscription. It is to be no less than $15,000. If possible the monument in Chicago will be a copy of the principal statue, at least of the Prague monument, of which a model is expected to arrive in this city within a few weeks.

    The project for the monument in Chicago was conceived by J. V. Matejka, a Bohemian editor of this city. He spoke to a number of prominent men of his nationality, who constituted themselves a temporary committee and issued invitations to all the Bohemian national societies in Chicago to take part in the movement. The plan was received with much favor. There was considerable excitement among the Bohemians owing to the agitation in the "old country" and their patriotism was aroused by the contemptuous remarks of the men in place and power in Bohemia.

    3

    Their sturdy Protestant spirit, fostered and developed by the atmosphere of the United States, had grown into a strong democratic feeling that rebelled against the presumption of the princes in the fatherland. Hence the various societies responded to the call with alacrity. Delegates were elected who will meet in the near future to discuss the particulars of the project.

    The Bohemian societies in the city are quite numerous and they have all given assurance of support. There are six Bohemian turning or gymnastic societies with a membership of about eight hundred.

    In commemoration of John Huss, the great Bohemian, who had been burnt at the stake in the market place of the city of Constance for raising his voice against the ...

    Bohemian
    II C
  • Svornost -- October 27, 1884
    The Memorable Day of the Reverence to Bohemian Art in America.

    The unveiling of the portrait of Jungmann, painted by Chicago's Bohemian Artist, Mrs. Maria Koupalova - Luskova.

    Last Sunday at 2 P.M., in the Bohemian National Hall, on 18th Street, a large audience of prominent Bohemians, called in by the Chairman of the Lodge, was present at the unveiling of the portrait of Mr. Jungmann, ordered by the Lodge and painted by the noted Bohemian Artist, Mrs. Maria Koupalova- Luskova.

    The artist and her husband, the lawyer, C.D.Luser, were invited to the ceremony.

    The celebration was opened with a speech by the Chairman, J. Rezny.

    The portrait was placed on a table on the side of the hall in a space very well lighted. At the last words of the speaker, the veil dropped and before us appeared Jungmann, life size, seated in a chair with a manuscript in his hand. The picture is 6 feet high and 4 feet wide in a richly gilded frame. It is a 2veritable image of our patriot, Jungman, artistically finished by our young painter who is acknowledged in the highest art circles of America.

    This picture will be an adornment of our National Hall for many years and an artistic remembrance and pride for the Jungmann Lodge. Every educated Bohemian, visiting Chicago, should not miss seeing this beautiful and precious portrait. The artist, Mrs. Luskova was paid $75. However, it is worth $300. The frame cost $40.

    Mr. Lusek, in the name of his wife, expressed his thanks for the acknowledgment of her work and congratulated the Jungmann lodge on its progress and cultural work. A guest from St. Louis Father Fr. Masek praised the progress of the Bohemians in Chicago and the choice of the artist. The Committee and a few guests than passed downstairs, where refreshments were served.

    The celebration was finished with many toasts to the artist, to the lodges and to Jungmann's honor. We must confess truthfully that this celebration left a very deep impression and in our imagination we visioned the future of the Bohemian people in America. We can see at this time more and more glimmering lights, far 3away from us, that are marking a long life for our nation. To-day's celebration marked the erection of one more monument, permanent and effective for the honor and memory of the Bohemians in America. We always can point to it with pride.

    The unveiling of the portrait of Jungmann, painted by Chicago's Bohemian Artist, Mrs. Maria Koupalova - Luskova. Last Sunday at 2 P.M., in the Bohemian National Hall, on 18th Street, ...

    Bohemian
    II C, II A 3 c, IV
  • Svornost -- July 27, 1885
    The Unveiling of the Monument of Professor Ladimir Klacel.

    It was really an impressive festival for our Bohemian metropolis. Thousands of people gathered at the unveiling of the monument of our great teacher, Ladimir Klacel. The festival committee was right in its decision not to have a procession led by bands; this removed the possibility of the disparagement of the Bohemian name in the opinion of other nationalities.

    As the Americans are mourning the loss of their best son, Ulysses S. Grant, the whole town is wrapped in deep sorrow. If we had marched in procession with a band, the local newspapers would again scold us, that we have no sentiment and no regard for the sentiments of our American co-citizens.

    The festival committee took the highest care not to give the smallest cause for complaints. Yesterday's procession was a real funeral procession. The participating societies marched quietly timed only by a drum, and all the banners were veiled. We have proved that we can respect the prominent men of this country, and 2we were praised for this in the press.

    The trains brought huge masses of Bohemians to the cemetery, they formed a large circle around the monument, the orchestra played the national hymn, and the mixed choir of the singing society,Lumir, sang a dirge in lowered voices. After this many wreaths were placed on the base of the monument.

    A long memorial speech formally delivered the monument to the Administration of the National Cemetery with the words: "Here is the result of two years of effort, the monument of our glorified, honorable Professor Ladimir Klacel. I am turning it over to your hands to include it in the estate of the National Cemetery, to protect it and to keep it as a proud symbol of the Bohemian people and as an inspiration for the national spirit for many future generations."

    DESCRIPTION OF THE MONUMENT.

    It is located in the middle of the newly opened second division of the cemetery, 3partly hidden among the trees, although it can be seen from all parts of the cemetery. It is thirteen feet high; the bust is carved in white marble, larger than life-size, two feet six inches high. The similarity of the features is exceptionally good and portrays the celebrity at the time that he lived in Chicago before his illness. The base of the monument is four by four feet square and one foot four inches high. The column is three feet ten inches high and supports the base of the bust. Except for the bust, the monument is of a greyish-blue granite, imported from the Hurricane Islands.

    The inscription on the front part of the pedestal is as follows:

    "Ladimir Klacel

    Born April the 7th, 1808 in Ceske Trebove,

    passed away March the 17th, 1882 in Belle Plaine, Iowa.

    Encourage yourselves-to be philosophers.

    Erected by the Bohemians of Chicago, July 26th, 1885 to their wise and great man."

    It was really an impressive festival for our Bohemian metropolis. Thousands of people gathered at the unveiling of the monument of our great teacher, Ladimir Klacel. The festival committee was ...

    Bohemian
    II C, II B 1 c 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 24, 1888
    Bohemian Monument Association

    The "Bohemian Monument Association" is an organization which has proposed to erect a monument for those Bohemian soldiers, who took part in the Revolutionary War and sacrificed their lives for their new fatherland.

    The following officials were elected last Saturday: William Kaspar, President; James Cermak, Secretary; J. Wemeck, Treasurer. Nearly all local Bohemian clubs were represented. A committee was appointed to draw up the by-laws. The next meeting will take place the following Sunday at the "Bohemian Athletic Club", when preparations will be made for the collection of funds.

    The "Bohemian Monument Association" is an organization which has proposed to erect a monument for those Bohemian soldiers, who took part in the Revolutionary War and sacrificed their lives for ...

    Bohemian
    II C, III D, III F, IV
  • Svornost -- January 06, 1890
    Jan Hus Memorial

    On the premises of the Bohemian-English Liberal School on 18th Street, there was held a meeting yesterday afternoon, at which time a report was made by the temporary committee on preliminary arrangements for the purpose of providing a suitable memorial for our national martyr, Jan Hus.

    The objective which some of our citizens have decided upon is surely noble and it is regretted that many of our prominent citizens who could effectively work for the accomplishment of this purpose have thus far remained aloof. We hope that the present movement will not die out before the purpose is definitely accomplished.

    The meeting was brought to order by the temporary chairman, Mr. J. Vilimovsky and the committee-shairman, Mr. J.V. Matejka reported on previous efforts of the committee. He also mentioned the sending of telegrams to Bohemia and recommended the appointment of a permanent committee and a committee for the collection of contributions and the issuance of a suitable proclamation to be published in the English papers.

    2

    The report was accepted, following which there developed a debate as to the best method to establish a permanent committee. Citizen Pondelicek moved that our various lodges be requested to send delegates, as only in that manner would the objective be successfully carried out, when the committee is set up as is the committee for the construction of the memorial to the Bohemian Veterans. The motion was resisted by citizen Matejka, who asked that the committee be appointed immediately. The majority being in favor of this, there was named a committee of twenty-five. Some of the speakers advanced the opinion that if the fulfillment of the entire purpose were left up to our Liberal Thought Societies, the entire Bohemian population of Chicago would not be able to take part. We must differ with them.

    Our nationalistic efforts are centered in our Lodges--they are at the focus of our national life. Whatever good our Lodges have thus far accomplished, they have done for the benefit of all Chicago Bohemians--of this we have an example in the National Cemetery, and they would do likewise in this purpose.

    3

    The Lodges will have to be called on for aid in the matter eventually and it is our opinion that it would be very tactful, if we expect to receive any help from this source in the successful accomplishment of our objective, to invite them to work with us from the very beginning.

    Mr. F. Novak--contributed fifty dollars toward the memorial. Mr. Vanek, the secretary, gave some of those present credentials for the cellection of contributions and the gathering disbursed.

    On the premises of the Bohemian-English Liberal School on 18th Street, there was held a meeting yesterday afternoon, at which time a report was made by the temporary committee on ...

    Bohemian
    II C, III B 2, II D 1, III C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 10, 1890
    A Huss Movement

    In conformity to the example of their compatriots of the former "Homeland", the Bohemians intend to erect a monument in Chicago in honor of Johann Huss, precursor of the Reformation. In Prague, Bohemia's capital, a life size statue will beautify a place opposite the National Museum, and a similar monument to Johann Huss shall find a niche in Douglas Park, say the local Bohemians. The Bohemian newspaper editor, J. V. Matejka has been the main cog in this propaganda and he succeeded in arousing the enthusiasm of all the Bohemian National clubs. Within the near future a meeting of the delegates is to be arranged to consider the practical aspects of the plan. A model of the Prague monument is expected....within a few weeks. The cost is estimated at $15,000; to be paid by contributions.

    In conformity to the example of their compatriots of the former "Homeland", the Bohemians intend to erect a monument in Chicago in honor of Johann Huss, precursor of the Reformation. ...

    Bohemian
    II C
  • Chicago Tribune -- March 09, 1891
    Bohemian Soldiers' Monument

    The Bohemian Monument and Memorial Association met yesterday afternoon at No. 400 West Eighteenth Street. Thirty societies were represented and met to make arrangements in connection with the Bohemian Soldiers' monument at the National Cemetery near Irving Park. When completed it will be one of the finest monuments erected in commemoration of the soldiers of the late war.

    Capt. E. R. Lewis has been selected Chairman of the committee in charge of ceremonies. The following committee was appointed: William Kaspar, John Waska, Frank Schultz, James Kubicek, and Joseph Stok. Prof. Kler, a young Bohemian artist, is the designer.

    The Bohemian Monument and Memorial Association met yesterday afternoon at No. 400 West Eighteenth Street. Thirty societies were represented and met to make arrangements in connection with the Bohemian Soldiers' ...

    Bohemian
    II C, III D
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 25, 1892
    The Bohemians in Chicago

    The Bohemians constitute a larger percentage of the population than is generally estimated... The first Bohemian immigrants arrived in Chicago in 1853. Several families undertook the long journey from New York to Chicago. Then erected log-houses upon the prairie which is now the North Side, and soon many of their countrymen followed their example. Among the first immigrants were Mathias Barcal, the father of Police-lieutenant Barcal, and J. Padeckcy...He is the founder of the Bohemian Athletic Clubs. Dr. Valenta was the first Bohemian physician and J. Fischer the first one to open a store.

    In 1860 the Bohemian colony in Chicago consisted of approximately 1,000 members. The first thing they organized was a rifle club. The sharpshooters participated in the war (Civil War) and were recognized as courageous fighters, particular in the battles at Mission-Ridge, Tunnel 2Hill, Bussetrost, etc. The commander of the Bohemian battalion, Major Michalozcy, was killed in the last mentioned battle.

    Considerable difficulties were experienced in getting a Bohemian newspaper established on a self-paying basis. Finally in 1870 the Nova Doba (New Era) seemed to be successful, but the Chicago Fire destroyed the undertaking.

    The Svornost (Unity) was organized in 1874 and became the leading newspaper among the Bohemians in the course of time. Besides the above paper two others, the Chicagske Listy, and the Denni Hlasatel, have now a large number of readers. There is also a large Bohemian library in Chicago.

    The scattered Bohemian colonies united in due time and settled in the territory between Canal, Ewing, Forquer, Taylor, and De Koven streets, 3where they build two gymnasiums, and a theater. The district located west of Halsted, and south of 16th street is now an exclusive Bohemian colony. Not less than 15,000 Bohemians own real-estate property there, and some of the buildings have a value of about $50,000.

    Other Bohemian colonies are located west of Ashland avenue, west of Douglas Park, and at Humboldt Park. Some of the schools in these territories are attended almost exclusively by Bohemian children. Likewise do we find Bohemian settlements in Town Lake, and on South Halsted street.

    There are not less than 300 Bohemian clubs in Chicago, and their social activities have reached the climax. The total Bohemian population is estimated at 60,000. The first representative of the Bohemians at the School Board was A. Kraus; his successor, Dr. Jirka, is also a Bohemian. L. W. Kadlec represented the Bohemians as an official of the Public 4Library, and his successor, W. Kaspar, became a financier. J. Kravolec is a member of the West Park Board.

    The Bohemians are represented at the present by the Republican Chott in the Congress of the State, by the Alderman, F. Dvorak in the City Council, and by Stepina at the County Board.

    They also possess a Bohemian brewery valued at $300,000 and a Bohemian cemetery in Irving Park which is valued at $200,000. They have erected a beautiful monument upon this cemetery in honor of their countrymen who lost their lives in the Civil War.

    The Bohemians constitute a larger percentage of the population than is generally estimated... The first Bohemian immigrants arrived in Chicago in 1853. Several families undertook the long journey from New ...

    Bohemian
    III A, II B 2 d 1, I A 1 a, II A 1, II A 2, II B 3, I F 4, III D, II C, I G
  • Svornost -- May 07, 1892
    J. A. Komensky

    As we announced in yesterday's issue of this paper, the J. A. Komensky Memorial Celebration Committee decided, with permission of the National Grand Lodge and the Grand Lodge of Illinois C. S. B. S. (Czecho-Slovak Benevolent Society), that the portrait of J. A. Komemsky, which was painted by our artist, Mr. Klire, be presented to the school, on whose front the name of Komemsky is engraved. The presentation took place yesterday.

    To be sure it was not a large celebration, but the more significant, because the respect for this great teacher was expressed in ardent words from the tender hearts of the children and if the Principal of the above named school keeps her word, Komemsky School will be the fountain from which will spread love and respect toward this Bohemian genius among American people.

    When the Committee arrived at the school at the appointed time, all 2pupils and teachers gathered in the upper hall and Mr. Matonsek, speaking in English, made the presentation. Mrs. Mahoney, Principal, accepted with a short talk. Dr. Jirka, as a member of the Committee, as well as the school board, explained to the gathering, the beneficient influence of Komensky and tried to awaken respect in the hearts of all for the greatest teacher of his time, who today is read by the entire civilized world.

    On all the black-boards of the school were written various extracts from Komemsky's writings. The teachers and the principal of Komemsky School gave proof that they are well acquainted with the writings of the great Bohemian teacher and that they respect his influence highly.

    As we announced in yesterday's issue of this paper, the J. A. Komensky Memorial Celebration Committee decided, with permission of the National Grand Lodge and the Grand Lodge of Illinois ...

    Bohemian
    II C, I A 1 a, II D 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 30, 1892
    Inauguration of the First Bohemian Soldier Monument.

    At the Bohemian National Cemetery at Irving Park an important festival took place yesterday. The Bohemians of Chicago erected a monument to the memory of the Bohemian American soldiers, who had sacrificed their lives in the Civil War. This monument was unveiled yesterday. The Grand Army of the Republic displayed its splendor and magnificence. The festival attracted approximately five thousand Bohemian citizens. The monument is of large propostions. It is made of bronze, and represents a common soldier with full equipment.

    All those participating in the inaugural ceremony assembled at 10 A.M. at Dearborn and Adams Street and marched to the Northwestern Station. The procession consisted of the following sections:

    Police squad, under Sergeant Johnson, C. R. Lewis, Field-Marshal and his staff; Slavonian music band; Camp No. 1 of the Sons of Veterans; Veterans of the Whitier Post, Grant Post, S. H. Thomas Post, Lincoln Post, and S. A. Custer Post;

    2

    Eminent Citizens in carriages;

    Bohemian Veteran Soldiers and Sailors;

    Bohemian K. of P. No. 2;

    Bohemian Athletic Clubs;

    Knights of Charles IV;

    Bohemian Citizens Club;

    John Huss Lodge J. O. F.

    Bohemian Grand Lodge;

    Bohemian-Slavonian Society;

    Bohemian National Association,

    Radetz-Ky Veterans,

    Otto-Kar Division K. of P1,

    3

    Bohemian-American Glee Club. J. Sindelar officiated as marshall of the Bohemian Clubs, and A. J. Miksch as marshal of the veterans.

    At the cemetery these various civil and military organizations assembled, group-wise, in a circle around the monument. The Bohemian Glee Club rendered a song as a prelude to the ceremony. Then Miss A. L. Steiska presented a large American flag to the officials of the cemetery in the name of the Bohemian Glee Club. President Malouseck held a preliminary speech welcoming the visitors in general, and, Ex-Mayor Harrison in particular.

    The Vice Commander of the Illinois section of the Grand Army of the Republic, H. S. Dietrich made the inaugural speech. He pointed out how the Bohemian-American Citizens had been ready to follow the call of their adopted fatherland when the war broke out. This monument, he declared, is not only a monument to honor the dead heroes, but to teach all men, that this country has room only for one government and one flag.

    4

    When the veil was removed from the monument, shouts of applause came from thousands of voices. Three salutes with cannon were made thrice the flags were dipped, and the first Bohemian military monument was dedicated...

    At the Bohemian National Cemetery at Irving Park an important festival took place yesterday. The Bohemians of Chicago erected a monument to the memory of the Bohemian American soldiers, who ...

    Bohemian
    II C, II B 1 c 3, III B 2, III D, I C