The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Svornost -- June 15, 1878
    Lecture

    A Free-thought lecture will be given to-morrow at 10 o'clock in the hall of the "Sokol" Gymnastic Union.

    Free admittance to all. Ladies permitted.

    A Free-thought lecture will be given to-morrow at 10 o'clock in the hall of the "Sokol" Gymnastic Union. Free admittance to all. Ladies permitted.

    Bohemian
    II B 2 g, III C
  • Svornost -- December 09, 1878
    Z Ctenarke Besedy ( from the Literary Club).

    In the last meeting which was held Saturday evening it was agreed that hereafter, we are to have lectures on Tuesdays and Saturdays. Also it was decided that any member wishing to speak should communicate with the agent of the Club so that he may publish the necessary information to members.

    Thus far the following have agreed to speak:- F. B. Zdrubek, V. Kotzum, Fr. Stetka and A. Purer. The first lecture will be held to-morriw night and Mr. F. B. Zdrubek will be the speaker.

    Fr. Stetkam Agent.

    In the last meeting which was held Saturday evening it was agreed that hereafter, we are to have lectures on Tuesdays and Saturdays. Also it was decided that any member ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 d, II B 2 g, IV
  • Svornost -- February 20, 1879
    [Pre-Election Activity of Bohemians]

    In view of this year's city and township elections, there is manifest a pleasing activity among Chicago Bohemians, not only, that they will vote as a bloc with the Socialist Party, but they are becoming members of this party so that they may participate more actively. The membership of the Bohemian section in the 6th Ward increased considerably and in the 8th Ward there was organized a section which 30 citizens joined immediately and which it is expected that all honorably minded working men and business men, of the ward will join at to-morrow's meeting. This section has called a mass-meeting for next Sunday to be held in the hall of "Telocvicna Jednoto Sokol" (Gymnastic Society Sokol). The regular meetings are held in the same hall on Fridays. Numerous countrymen of ours in the seventh ward are also thinking about organizing a Bohemian Section and are holding a meeting for that purpose in the private premises of Citizen Josef Kadic.

    Also numerous Bohemian citizens of the fourteenth ward are contemplating the organization of a Bohemian section either by the end of this week or early next week with many ardently active members, as enlightened citizens of the Northwest side agree throughout with the principles of the Socialist Labor Party.- We trust the numerous Bohemian citizens of the Southside, in the fifth ward, will not lag 2behind and we shall rejoice in the fact that we have five strong Bohemian Sections in the Socialist Party which will work for the realization of labor's just cause. If we glance backward in retrospect we must admit the opposition is stiffening. For a long time there has been only one Bohemian Section in our city, that was in the Sixth Ward, and its activities were limited because of a small membership. The appearance locally of leaflets, furious and slanderous, of some of the fallen leaders and their adherents helped to awaken the laboring classes more than some people think. For this same reason it is bringing together honest Bohemian citizens, who although they previously supported the principles of the Socialist Party did not actually become members of it.

    The movement which in this regard has among up among Chicago Bohemians is most welcome, because until now there never was among us such pre-election activity as at present. Would that our here-tofore inaction and unconcern had vanished, for we used to take no interest in public matters except before elections and then only to lapse into indifference again after elections.

    3

    Let us conscientiously attend lectures on Science and on Economics. Let us arrange public discussions, debating timely questions and let us appear in the election arena, fully prepared and decided on what action to take in order that we shall not be like a shall boat, which the waves of the political seas toss about at will.

    Activity! Ardent unselfish activity is for the good of all honestly sincere leaders among us.

    In view of this year's city and township elections, there is manifest a pleasing activity among Chicago Bohemians, not only, that they will vote as a bloc with the Socialist ...

    Bohemian
    I F 1, II B 2 g, I E
  • Svornost -- July 17, 1879
    [Sokol Celebration]

    Damsky S'Bor Vlasta Cislo I (Vlasta Woman's Club No. 1) held a celebration yesterday in Telocyicne Jednota Sokol (Sokol Gymnastic Union) Hall in commemoration of the birth of the great Bohemian teacher and nationalist, Josef Jakob Jungmann.

    Mrs. Kl. Novak opened the session with an appropriate address referring to the deathless memory of Josef Jungmann, after which Miss Alb. Fligl gave a biographical lecture on this celebrated genius of ours, calling especial attention to all that Josef Jungmann did for Bohemian nationality. Several more short talks followed. Every speaker was applauded.

    It is to the honor of the Woman's club that it never forgets to honor the memory of those who merit remembrance. Toward midnight the ladies served a delightful supper. The entertainment was informal, and there were dancing and singing. It is to be regretted that so few young men attended.

    Damsky S'Bor Vlasta Cislo I (Vlasta Woman's Club No. 1) held a celebration yesterday in Telocyicne Jednota Sokol (Sokol Gymnastic Union) Hall in commemoration of the birth of the great ...

    Bohemian
    III B 2, II B 1 c 3, II B 2 g, III H, III A
  • Svornost -- April 25, 1881
    Czecho-Slovak Orphanage

    The"Pilsen" Literary Society, which has of late been revived, and whose numbers take great pleasure in discussing and advancing all important matters of community interest, called a meeting of citizens last Saturday. The purpose of the meeting was to decide whether or not a Czecho-Slovak Orphanage in the United States, about which there has been much said in the public press, should be founded.

    The attendance at the meeting was very small and if we were not aware of the great dislike of our countrymen for anything that has the semblance of a meeting called for charitable purposes, we would be compelled to think that such a noble, philanthropic thought has no adherents among Chicago Bohemians.

    The meeting was brought to order by the Literary Society's chairman, Mr. Lajer, who explained the purpose of the meeting. Mr. C. Hloucal, was secretary of the meeting.

    We must express our regret over the fact, that with the exception of the true Nationalist, our old Mr. Svoboda, all the speakers were in opposition 2to the founding of the Orphanage. The discussion was lively and interesting and deviated from the main subject toward the end: that is, to the discussion of whether or not the Bohemian Nationalistic Ideals should be upheld in America. After a lengthy debate the following resolutions were adopted:

    (1) That the expenses involved in maintaining an Orphanage are so great, that it is impossible for Chicago Bohemians to attend to the building of a National Orphanage.

    (2) We urge all Benefit and Nationalistic Societies to provide for the public care of orphans in all cities.

    (3) That for the preservation of our Nationality it is an unavoidable necessity, first of all, to found Bohemian Schools, both daily and Sunday; and we further urge National Societies in other cities where there are no Bohemian Schools, to take necessary steps for their founding.

    The"Pilsen" Literary Society, which has of late been revived, and whose numbers take great pleasure in discussing and advancing all important matters of community interest, called a meeting of citizens ...

    Bohemian
    II D 4, II B 1 d, II B 2 f, III B 2, III A, II B 2 g
  • Svornost -- March 04, 1900
    Lenten Lectures.

    The liberal community Svobodna Obec is arranging this year, as in previous years, their special lectures in the hall of the Bohemian-English school. These lectures will be held every Lenten Sunday for the followers of free-thinking ideas, for the purpose of strengthening their consciousness that blind faith in erroneous public worship and oral prayers is only treachery and poison to the heart; that the real God is a sense, the known laws, the truth and the love of humanity.

    We suppose the welfare of humanity is more dependent upon good sense than upon errors, upon light rather than darkness, and that should be sufficient motive for everyone who has not yet joined, to join one of our lodges now, which are always open to progress and education.

    The speaker of the liberal community Mr. Frank B. Zdrubek chose this year a very interesting theme, "Saviors of the Nation," which he will develop very accurately, as always.

    2

    The community Svobodna Obec is working not for profit, but for recognition, and its only objective is to spread the light before these people who are still blindfolded.

    The liberal community Svobodna Obec is arranging this year, as in previous years, their special lectures in the hall of the Bohemian-English school. These lectures will be held every Lenten ...

    Bohemian
    I B 4, II B 2 g, III C, IV
  • Denní Hlasatel -- March 05, 1901
    Lectures at the Society of Bohemian Journalists.

    At the last meeting of the "Society of Bohemian Journalists," it was decided that at the regular meetings, hereafter, some one of the members is to arrange a lecture. The first such lecture will take place at the next meeting to be held this coming Saturday in the club room on the second floor of the Schlitz Building, corner of 19th street and Blue Island avenue, and it is certain that all members will attend. The society's room is furnished with various comforts; there is a selection of American newspapers and there will be arriving soon the leading papers of Bohemia. The "Society of Bohemian Journalists" is zealously working toward an excellent goal and will surely become a good example in Bohemian-American public life.

    At the last meeting of the "Society of Bohemian Journalists," it was decided that at the regular meetings, hereafter, some one of the members is to arrange a lecture. The ...

    Bohemian
    II A 1, II B 2 g
  • Denní Hlasatel -- August 17, 1901
    New Religious Sect.

    The Liberal Society, (Jan A. Komensky), was incorporated as a religious society under the laws of the State of Illinois on June 5th, 1901, and has the right to elect a speaker who is legally empowered to perform the marriage ceremony according to the methods of the society. Joe J. Burita was chosen to act as the speaker. The Society, which was formerly known as the Jan A. Komensky Educational Society, does not intend to allow it's educational activities to slow down. It intends to increase and expand them.

    Since money is required to do this and since the Society is composed mostly of people of small means, the speaker has elected to perform his duties without pay.

    All money collected by the Society will go into the Society's treasury, to be used for the maintainence of the educational class, which will be arranged for evenings, in the Society's building. Beginning next month the Society will also hold regular lecture meetings, before the Sunday school meetings every Sunday afternoon.

    2

    Twice each week, on Monday and Thursday, the speaker, Jos. J. Burita, will teach English. Other educational projects will be started as soon as financial conditions permit. All decent Bohemians, irrespective of religious beliefs, will be allowed to attend the English school, all other educational classes, and all lectures. For the privilege of attending the school and other educational projects a small fee will be charged. Admission to the Sunday lectures will be free; however, a voluntary contribution will be taken for the building fund, which now amounts to over $50. According to the speaker, Mr. Burita, the purpose of the Society is for the members to strive for a moral and dignified life and to further this ideal, by example and teaching in order to gain and convert their friends. He does not think that for this purpose it is necessary to resort to abuse and scoffing. What is necessary is continuous positive work, governed at all times by the rules of decency. The Society must proclaim at the very beginning that no barbarous attack will be made upon any religious sect nor against the liberal camp.

    The Society's hall, where meetings are held every Saturday is located at 774 So. Ashland Ave., near 17th Street. The Board of Trustees is composed of 3the following named persons: J.J.Burita, V. Chochola, Ruzena Fivek, Richard Hlina, Jos. Herout, Jos. Richter, Marie Hasek.

    The Liberal Society, (Jan A. Komensky), was incorporated as a religious society under the laws of the State of Illinois on June 5th, 1901, and has the right to elect ...

    Bohemian
    III C, II B 2 g, II B 2 f, I A 3
  • Denní Hlasatel -- May 15, 1902
    Lecture by Professor Masaryk the Development of Czech Socialism Since 1848.

    Prof. Masaryk, who came to the United States for the purpose of giving a series of lectures at the University of Chicago, made a short stopover in New York and used the opportunity to arrange a lecture for his countrymen. This was given on Sunday afternoon May 11th in the National Hall before a distinguished assembly of countrymen.

    Professor Masaryk came to America without any boisterous fanfare, but his literary significance is all the more prominent, for reports of his earlier public and teaching activities have been preserved here.

    This probably explains the general interest, which was called forth by Sunday's lecture.

    As was stated in the beginning Professor Masaryk lectured on "The development of Czech socialism since the year 1848."

    2

    Although the lecture was started somewhat later than the time it was announced for, the public, appeased by the band's selections, patiently waited until the arrival of the lecturer. When he finally put in an appearance he was welcomed with a veritable storm of applause.

    Before we proceed to the lecture proper, write New York papers-- it will not be amiss, if we take a little notice of the lecturer's person.

    Professor Masaryk, although he is a man of about fifty-two years of age, at first sight has the appearance of a highly intelligent man. The manner of his appearance is pleasing at first sight. It is neither the appearance of a pessimist nor a fanatic! On the other hand, hardly does he materialize before the eyes of the public, it becomes evident, that we have to do with a man extremely spiritual, who exists in human life spiritually and not at all bodily.

    3

    It is not possible to speak here about any measure for the education of this university professor, educated by the highest authorities in the world. At least so far as we are concerned, we consider Professor Masaryk a learned man, which is also evidenced among newspaper opinions.

    In brief, we consider him an authority and even though his views are at odds with the customary views of so called patriots, we have respect for him as a man of science, spiritual strength and extraordinary energy.

    But that is enough of that. Mr. Masaryk's Sunday lecture served only to the honor of his reputation and his name.

    Although he limited himself exclusively to Czech conditions, still his logical deductions influenced everyone so convincingly, that no one was able to disprove them. His easy and readily understood manner of speech had a noticeable influence upon the listeners.

    4

    The interest of the listeners, who gathered in great numbers because of the fair weather, was lively. Each of those present followed the speaker devotedly, knowing that such occasions are rarely offered them.

    The clear voice of the speaker filled the space of the large hall of the National Building and the simple but massive subject of the lecture was so masterfully carried out that the interest of the listeners was held from beginning to end.

    The lecture summarized in brief is as follows:

    In the prologue the speaker said that he considered it an honor that his first lecture here is in Czech and that he can speak about Czech socialism. About the socialist question he said, "I do not find a more important question in Bohemia. Our people are a nation of workers. There can be no mention of a national aristocracy. The working class create the nation, to speak of that is my purpose.

    5

    "Bohemian lands were and are the jewel of the Austrian Crown. Already in the 17th and 18th centuries they were recognized as the most industrialized lands in Austria. Therefore Bohemian lands, as industrial, were more apt, these others, to incline toward socialism. To be sure, that beginning did not fully develop until after the year 1848 at which time true life first began. Up to that time the people were in serfdom, the Bohemian peasant was a white Slave. However from the year 1848 the people arose with their demands, mainly political.

    "When the Paris revolution spread and overwhelmed Prague, there was assembled in the St. Wenceslaus Baths in Prague on March 11th a congress and here among other things was introduced the demand for the organization of labor. The whole rebellion had a purely socialistic foundation.

    6

    "There would not have been so many political errors, if the mass of people had been remembered, that is, politics should have been conducted more along democratic lines. However, when the reaction set in, after 1848, neither Bach nor the government wanted to recognize or make use of the gains of the revolution, that is the destruction fudalism. The peasant was free to a certain extent and progress was possible. Absolutism was continued further, but the year 1848 had great social significance, even greater than the political.

    "That the success of socialism was not such as it should have been, can be laid to the fact that it came with the French revolution, it was overwhelming and therefore did not carry out social reform.

    However there were many who began to work on these fundamentals, among them was Klacel, who finished his activities in America.

    7

    In the year 1859 we see an order which takes into consideration the factory workers and in 1869, when constitutionalism was begun it was more than plain, that the question of socialism must be solved and that labor was beginning to organize.

    "La Salle and Marx appeared with doctrines of socialism and their doctrines were accepted. In 1867 when the Austrian constitution gave the right of assembly, there was among workingmen and organizations more interest. However there were no organizers. Labor announced, that it was expelling politics from it's program and that it thinks that the socialist question can be directed by the national-government. However it was soon discovered, that it was impossible to accomplish anything in Austria without politics. Therefore a new motto was adopted: Into Politics.

    8

    "A new movement, brought in from Germany, where the doctrines of La Salle and Marx were combined, was introduced into Bohemia and the doctrines of Marx gained supremacy over the doctrines of Bakunin, because socialism is a consistent antagonist of anarchism. Thus there followed two tendencies, anarchism against socialism and socialism against anarchism. In the 80's anarchism was defeated, but socialsim was victorious. Already in 1878 the government provided health insurance and in 1888 accident insurance, in the year 1889 the first political club was organized and in the 90's Bohemian labor stood upon its own feet. In 1897 they organized their own daily paper Pravo Lidu and labor takes notice of and discusses all important questions. The organization of the women is progressing and it is from that time that their developement is figured.

    "It is certain, that the modern movement in Bohemia is socialistic. Even older writings indicate this. Macha, Nemcova, Svetla and others indirectly touched upon socialism. Neruda, Arbes and mainly in the later period Machar, who is considered as the greatest socialist poet, dedicated and still dedicate their powers to it and if literature is the product of the spirit, then Bohemian literature proclaims, that the question is a socialist question. To the little Bohemian man belongs the future!"--

    Prof. Masaryk, who came to the United States for the purpose of giving a series of lectures at the University of Chicago, made a short stopover in New York and ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 g, I E, III H, I C, IV
  • Denní Hlasatel -- June 25, 1902
    Masaryk's Lecture.

    Public lectures, which are regularly held in the summer, were begun at the University of Chicago yesterday. This year's lectures are of interest to us Bohemians because among others. Professor T. G. Masaryk of the Bohemian University of Prague is lecturing.

    In his lecture of yesterday he gave a statistical and ethnological summary of the Slavonic races, and particularly of the Bohemian race, further he discoursed about Slovanic institutions. The lecture was fairly well attended and interested the listeners in no small measure.

    The lectures are given regularly on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday in the University Theatre on 57th Street and Ellis Avenue. Everyone is welcome to attend these lectures that secure tickets of admission. The price is twenty-five cents for a single lecture and two dollars for the series of twelve lectures.

    Today Professor Masaryk will lecture on the Bohemian Reformation and on Jan Hus. For tomorrow's theme he has taken Peter Chelcicky and Amos Komensky.

    2

    Besides Masaryk there are now lecturing at the University, Hamlin Garland, Lorado Taft, Professor Richard Green Moulton, and Professor H. L. Stetson of Kalamazoo College.

    Public lectures, which are regularly held in the summer, were begun at the University of Chicago yesterday. This year's lectures are of interest to us Bohemians because among others. Professor ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 g, III H, IV