The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 06, 1891
    An Important Festival

    An opportunity presented itself yesterday to the Bohemian population of this city to express their sincere gratitude and sympathy towards one of their eminent and well-known countrymen, the Rev. Joseph Molitor, who celebrated his 25th anniversary as a priest. His life presents, indeed, a part of the history of the development of Bohemian colonization in the United States.

    His arrival in Chicago in 1866 was of far-reaching importance to the development of Bohemian activity and Catholic religion locally as well as in the whole west. Sensing the truth that the school is the most effective means and its results most lasting for the cultivation and maintenance of desirable national characteristics and customs, he devoted to this branch of education of his countrymen his undivided attention and activity.

    As president of the Bohemian Literary Club of America he found ways and 2means to have schoolbooks printed in the Bohemian language and to have children make use of them, thereby promoting their mental development. Since the Bohemian population increased steadily in this city, his activities along these lines were very successful. In 1866 only one Bohemian Catholic Church existed in this city, namely the Wenzel-Church, whose pastor is still Rev. Molitor; but today there are seven churches among a population of 75,000 people, in which services are held in the mother tongue; the children being taught same in their parochial schools.

    In view of these facts it was a well-deserved tribute of gratitude which was yesterday rendered to the honorable jubilee-celebrant. Not only Bohemian and Polish, German churches of this city sent their delegates to the festival, but they also came from Detroit, St. Louis, Cleveland, Milwaukee, etc.

    The sermon for the occasion was delivered by J. Kosidelka of Cleveland, who expressed with eloquent words what the audience felt toward the 3guest of honor.

    After the church services a banquet was held in the school-house in which a considerable number of clergmen participated. The honored priest received toasts in seven different languages. Nearly all persons who come from the Slavonic countries of Austria-Hungary are able to speak the German language.

    The impressive celebration closed last night with a dramatic and musical performance before a large audience.

    An opportunity presented itself yesterday to the Bohemian population of this city to express their sincere gratitude and sympathy towards one of their eminent and well-known countrymen, the Rev. Joseph ...

    Bohemian
    IV, II B 2 d 3, II B 1 d, I A 2 b
  • Svornost -- January 17, 1896
    Big Loss in Carl Jonas' Death

    The Bohemian community in the U.S. has suffered a great and unredeemable loss in its national and political life.

    With the death of Carl Jonas, the Bohemian-American community lost its first tutor and protector, its national idealist, and instructor. Since 1863, when he was 23 years of age, he had offered all his energy, ability, and life to the cause of awakening and exciting the Bohemian-American people to honest workmanship and education.

    Overworked, he lost the fight with life as the American consul in Crefeld, where he represented his American countrymen.

    Carl Jonas was known and honored by every Bohemian in America during the last 33 years because he was always active as reporter, editor, and manager of the publications Slavie, Zwon, Prorok and American.

    2

    His main works are a Bohemian-English vocabulary, "A Woman in a Human Community," "Austro-American Pacts and Conventions," "American Law" (3 editions), "Bohemian Interpretations for Americans.

    He also studied law, political science, and economy. He created the Bohemian colony in Kaledonia, near Racine, Wis.

    A republican until 1872, he was entirely absorbed with the creation of his big Bohemian colony in Kaledonia.

    Beloved, eloquent, his advice was always appreciated and approved even by the old settlers in his new colony.

    In 1872, Carl Jonas became a democrat, taking part in the state's democratic events and gaining prominence and influence among older politicans.

    Nobody could state that he was a professional politician acting for his own 3profit,--honestly or dishonestly. He never soiled his honor for political reasons and kept all promises to friends and political opponents.

    Married to Christine Kozicka, daughter of a Racine farmer, he left 4 children, all married and in the United States.

    A freethinker from his youngest years, he never believed in the dominating power of priesthood or nomility over the population. The activity of his whole life was concentrated in that direction. The memory of Carl Jonas should never be forgotten.

    He was buried in Prague, Bohemia.

    The Bohemian community in the U.S. has suffered a great and unredeemable loss in its national and political life. With the death of Carl Jonas, the Bohemian-American community lost its ...

    Bohemian
    IV, II B 2 d 1, II B 2 d 3, II A 1
  • Svornost -- April 01, 1900
    The Memoirs of the Bohemian Doctor.

    The other day there was issued by the printinghouse of August Geringer a very valuable publication, which certainly will surprise the Bohemian public.

    The publication describes the history of the city of Chicago and its suburbs, and so long as it describes the Bohemian lifeit is, undoubtedly, a wonderful contribution to the history of American Bohemians in Chicago.

    This publication entitled "The Memoirs of the Bohemian Doctor," discusses the history of the Bohemians in America, generally, and in Chicago, particularly and is written by the oldest Bohemian physician in Chicago, Dr. Jan Habenicht. A beautiful preface adorns the first pages of this book. The annals of the Bohemian life in Chicago are the most important part of the book and you will find there a complete description of the private, public, and social life of the Bohemians, and it will be really a truly cherished remembrance for everybody; so much the more as the details are described correctly, completely and impartially.

    2

    The price of this book is 25 cents, which makes it accessible to everybody. It is even possible for the poor people to buy this book for their household. There are innumerable perfect and original illustrations. Generally speaking, the book, "Memoirs of the Bohemian Doctor," is very meritorious and worthy to be acquired by every Bohemian, because it is a chronicle of our life on the soil of our new fatherland.

    The other day there was issued by the printinghouse of August Geringer a very valuable publication, which certainly will surprise the Bohemian public. The publication describes the history of the ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 d 3, II A 1
  • Denní Hlasatel -- December 07, 1903
    For a Beautiful School

    It cannot be denied that in spite of the indifference to everything patriotic, in spite of the decline of national consciousness, which properties are a characteristic portion of a large percentage of our countrymen, there are among our people many such, who spare no effort and are not afraid of any sacrifice, when the question is the development and elevation of our national life. Members of the Patronage of the Ladimir Klacel Bohemian-American school, individually and collectively, surely rank first place among these generous patriots. Whoever is a sincere patriot, provides first of all for the preservation and elevation of national schools, because they are the foundation of everything. If there were no Bohemian schools, our youth would very soon become denationalized. Our youth becomes acquainted with Bohemian books in these schools and does not denationalize so easily. The Patronage of the Ladimir Klacel Bohemian-American school has taken the task of maintaining one of the Bohemian schools of our community and is fulfilling its task zealously.

    2

    A grand exhibition was opened by it in the Ladimir Klacel hall at 19th and Leavitt Streets yesterday, which will last until December 12th and the profits derived there from will accrue to the benefit of the school building and the society's hall.

    The affair was generally successful yesterday, which certainly can be attributed to the zealous activity of the Arrangements Committee. We hope the exhibition will meet with like success during the following days of its existence. It would be to the shame of the public if such was not the case, in view of the work connected with such an exhibition and especially in view of the purpose. We are, so to speak, certain that there will be none among our enlightened countrymen who will fail to visit this exhibition or begrudge the nickel, dedicated to such a good purpose for the benefit of the Bohemian school. Arise there fore and go to the exhibition!

    It cannot be denied that in spite of the indifference to everything patriotic, in spite of the decline of national consciousness, which properties are a characteristic portion of a large ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 c 3, II B 2 d 3, II B 2 f, I C
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 13, 1907
    Plays for Bohemian-American Children

    P.1--Mr. B. Hladky, the well-known and ambitious teacher of the fourth grade in the Vojta Naprstek Bohemian School, has written and arranged plays to be presented by the students of the School.

    A collection of his plays will be published in book form by a publishing company of Chicago.

    Mr. B. Hladky has taught Bohemian at this school for several years, achieving more success with the students than any teacher had done before. He teaches his scholars thoroughly and is well liked by them.

    His book of dialogues is recommended for all Bohemian schools. It contains plays for all occassions.

    P.1--Mr. B. Hladky, the well-known and ambitious teacher of the fourth grade in the Vojta Naprstek Bohemian School, has written and arranged plays to be presented by the students of ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 c 1, II B 2 d 3, III B 2, I A 1 b, II A 1
  • Denní Hlasatel -- March 14, 1907
    Literature

    p. 1--Attorney Thomas Capek, a well known Bohemian who has gained merit and fame among Bohemian-Americans for his scientific and political literature, has just completed a second volume of "Memories of Bohemian Emigrants in America." This book is published by a Bohemian printing concern in Omaha.

    Anybody who is interested in the history of the first Bohemian immigrants to America, cannot find a book anywhere at any price that will serve its purpose better than this book. Yet this book will sell at the nominal price of one dollar.

    It pictures and describes Bohemian immigration and emigration from the "White Mountain era" to the year 1848.

    The author states that this book is not a history, but just an addition to it.

    He claims that even more important facts about the Bohemian people could be discovered by some one who would have interest and time for research.

    This book is recommended to all Bohemian people in America.

    p. 1--Attorney Thomas Capek, a well known Bohemian who has gained merit and fame among Bohemian-Americans for his scientific and political literature, has just completed a second volume of "Memories ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 e, II B 2 d 3
  • Denní Hlasatel -- March 17, 1911
    New Officers of the Bohemian-American Press Rureau

    Election of officers of the Bohemian-American Press Bureau took place at the last meeting of the newly elected executive committee. James F. Stepina was elected chairman to replace Mr. John J. Fucik, who resigned from the office because of increased business matters. The retiring chairman was tendered a vote of thanks of the other members for the good work he has done for the organization. Mr. Em. Beranek remains vice-chairman; R. Jaromir Psenka, as secretary, and Mr. Frank J. Skala, as treasurer. Mr. Fucik accepted the chairmanship of the financial committee.

    The agreement between the executive committee and the directors, Doctor J. Salaba Vojan, was extended for another year. Another important decision was for the revision of the English text books and encyclopedic 2works, and the sending of corrections and informative articles to publishers, whose publications do not give the happenings about Bohemians and Bohemia correctly.

    Election of officers of the Bohemian-American Press Bureau took place at the last meeting of the newly elected executive committee. James F. Stepina was elected chairman to replace Mr. John ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 d 3
  • Denní Hlasatel -- April 30, 1911
    Bohemian-American Literature

    Dr. Jaroslav E. Salaba Vojan, journalist and manager of the Ceske Tiskove Kancelare, (The Bohemian Press Bureau), also author of Velkeho New Yorky, wrote and published a new book, Cesko-Americke Epistoly (Bohemian-American Epistles). The writer dedicated this work to his wife, Olga, but we immediately note that he made a remarkable gift to Bohemian-American literature thereby. Bohemian-American literature is scarce, almost too scarce, so far as really worth-while works are concerned, and we welcome with sincerest joy its every enrichment with works of distinctive worth.

    Bohemian-American Epistles is such a work, even if we did not agree with some parts of its contents. For instance, we disagree with the author in his division of Bohemian-Americans into three groups. We agree that there is a group here which is rapidly and indifferently becoming denationalized. These people the author places in the first group. We also know, and agree with the author that there is another group of those who, although they are becoming 2adjusted to American habits and customs, are remaining sincere Bohemians, but we do not agree with the author that there is a third group, who are surrounding themselves with a veritable Chinese Wall against everything American and, under no consideration, want to admit that they are in any way duty-bound to this new country. True, there are such people here, but they do not and cannot create a group. They are merely strays, a few individuals, who simply can not be considered. Otherwise, we agree with the contents of the book to the last letter.

    Dr. Vojan sees correctly what we have, and what we lack. He judges remarkably the work accomplished by Bohemians in America, and we admit he is absolutely correct when he says that Bohemians in America are not a dying branch of the Bohemian people, and are not threatened with extinction as many Bohemian writers predicted, who, in former days, made a flying visit through America.

    Bohemian-American Epistles are written in a beautiful, easily understood style, and because the cover of the book is very fine, we do not doubt that 3it will become an adornment to every Bohemian-American library. We recommend it most heartily.

    Dr. Jaroslav E. Salaba Vojan, journalist and manager of the Ceske Tiskove Kancelare, (The Bohemian Press Bureau), also author of Velkeho New Yorky, wrote and published a new book, Cesko-Americke ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 d 3, II B 1 e, I C, IV
  • Denní Hlasatel -- May 07, 1911
    Young Chicago Bohemian an English Author

    The Home Friend, a monthly published in Kansas City, Missouri, has brought to us several works of the young Bohemian-American, Mr. Joseph Novak. Mr. Novak is the son of our well-known countryman, Mr. Novak of Novak & Stejskal, real-estate dealers. The youthful writer, a sincere Bohemian, and former president of Komensky Club, in addition to his duties in his father's office, is studying law.

    The May issue of the above mentioned monthly brings the beginning of a new work by Novak, "The Heir to the Charles Millions." Several shorter novels by this author were published by the Welcome Guest.

    The Home Friend, a monthly published in Kansas City, Missouri, has brought to us several works of the young Bohemian-American, Mr. Joseph Novak. Mr. Novak is the son of our ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 d 3, IV
  • Denní Hlasatel -- May 30, 1911
    Why the Number of Bohemian Books Is Insufficient in the Public Library

    That there are no Bohemian books in the Public Library, aside from those which were deposited there about a quarter of a century ago, and which have been augmented in no way for at least fifteen years, has long been a source of indignation. Yesterday, Professor Jaroslav J. Zmrhal had an opportunity to speak about it. He said the fault lies with both the management of the Public Library, and the Bohemian public.

    "I visit the public library often," said Professor Zmrhal, "and I find that there exists great indifference toward Bohemian literature. The Public Library has special blanks upon which anyone may enter the title of a book not found in the library, the purchase of which is recommended. It has happened to me several times already that I recommended an English book and a Bohemian book, and although the English book always has been purchased, the Bohemian book was not. The blank which recommended the Bohemian book always disappeared in some unexplained manner.

    2

    To be sure it does not happen often that some countryman uses the privilege of recommending the purchase of a book, but when it does happen, the management of the library does not make the purchase. I believe that there are no people there who know Bohemian, and, therefore, the purchase of Bohemian books causes the management difficulties. In that way the disappearance of such recommendations is explained."

    That there are no Bohemian books in the Public Library, aside from those which were deposited there about a quarter of a century ago, and which have been augmented in ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 d 3, I C