The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Svornost -- June 03, 1878
    [Reading Club Commemorates the Death of Voltaire]

    The Reading Club commemorated the one hundredth Anniversary of the death of Voltaire, exhibiting a large portrait of him and reading several of his shorter works. Because of rain, attendance was small.

    We were much surprised at the skill of our young and modest artist, Miss M. Koupalove.

    Using a small portrait as a model, she completed, in two hours, a large painting for the club. She is certainly deserving of recognition and encourgement to proceed to further success.

    The Reading Club commemorated the one hundredth Anniversary of the death of Voltaire, exhibiting a large portrait of him and reading several of his shorter works. Because of rain, attendance ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 d, II B 1 b, II B 1 e, IV
  • Svornost -- December 20, 1881
    Vaclav Denoch

    Vaclav Lenoch, died in the county hospital in Milwaukee, Wis. He was widely known in Bohemian-American circles as one of our foremost actors. He was born in 1846 and came to America in 1869, living in Chicago intermittently. About two years ago he moved to Racine and from there to Milwaukee.

    The theatre was his universe; all his powers, all his existence and his very life were dedicated to the theatre. How well he knew the theatre! With his comedy he caused tears and laughter, and with his tragedy, tears of sorrow and city. Vaclav Lenoch was uncommonly talented in many ways; he painted, wrote, translated and composed poetry. Our foremost post, V. Snajdr, praised several of Lenoch's poems and published them in his paper.

    Lenoch was a contributor to "Ducha Casus and to "Svornost": he translated the theatrical play, "Robert and Bertram", and in other ways took part in our nationalistic movement.

    Vaclav Lenoch, died in the county hospital in Milwaukee, Wis. He was widely known in Bohemian-American circles as one of our foremost actors. He was born in 1846 and came ...

    Bohemian
    IV, II A 3 d 1, II B 1 e
  • Denní Hlasatel -- October 10, 1903
    Third Thousand

    A meeting was again held last night, it's purpose being the alleviation of want, which has befallen the hundreds upon hundreds of our countrymen in Eastern Bohemia who were visited by that terrible calamity of the elements during the month of July. The meeting was conducted by a large attendence of women and men representatives of various lodges and societies, in the premises of the Ladimir Klacel Reading Club, in the hall of the same name on Leavitt and 19th street. It should be said, that the reading club particularly exerted itself to see that the lodges sent their representatives to the collective committee, and thereby it had undeniably earned credit for the fact that the relief movement spread so remarkably. During yesterday's meeting it was resolved to send to Bohemia the sum of one thousand crowns, which is the third such remittance.

    The meeting was brought to order at eight o'clock by the chairman of the committee Mr. Antonin Cmolik. The secretary Mr. Frant. Ort read the minutes 2of the previous meeting. It could be seen that everything to the smallest detail was recorded very carefully and marked "Accepted". The collection sheets were then read and from all indications it is certain that they were in the hands of energetic collectors, because each one of them showed generous receipts. Mr. Vacl. Spacek gave a report on the entertainment at the Bohemian American Sokol Hall, which was for the benefit of the calamity stricken. According to the report made, it is to be regretted that the entertainment was not attended in such a manner, as decidedly, considering the purpose for which it was arranged, it should have been.

    As a result of the small attendance, the committee had left many donated cigars, much beer, wine, etc. It was decided, therefore, that another affair should be arranged,preferably in Bohemian California, of which community it is known, that Bohemians there do not become frightened by thunder and lightning, and that they will surely attend in large numbers.

    3

    For this purpose a committee was elected and it is to begin making preparations at once. Receipts at this meeting amounted to $190.60. As a result, it was voted to send 1000 crowns to the order of Mrs. Naprstek, in Bohemia, who will then deliver it to the proper place. The meeting was then declared adjourned. The next meeting will be held in two weeks.

    A meeting was again held last night, it's purpose being the alleviation of want, which has befallen the hundreds upon hundreds of our countrymen in Eastern Bohemia who were visited ...

    Bohemian
    II D 10, II B 1 e
  • Denní Hlasatel -- June 23, 1905
    Adolf Heyduk Attains Three Score and Ten

    During the closing days of this month one of the most prolific and most popular among the Bohemian poets of the nineteenth century is nearing the seventieth year of his life. His comparatively long span of life has been devoted entirely to the writing of poetry which, peacefully flowing from the southwestern Bohemian forests into our literary market, will occupy a place of honor on the shelves of Bohemian literature.

    This poet whose birthday is being celebrated belongs among the oldest literati of our homeland. He has managed to retain a personal brightness and buoyancy and a certain youthful enthusiasm in his work which must be called extraordinary, indeed, in our times. Though old in years and rich in experience, his spirit and his temperament are vigorous and youthful. This is the light in which Heyduk appears to us, in contrast to the unnatural and decadent writers of our times who, even in their teens, are torn already by fatigue, ennui, and mental torpor--qualities with which they infect their literary products.

    2

    Heyduk has preserved his remarkable vigor and creative enthusiasm primarily because he became fond of tranquillity and rural solitude; because he avoided the turmoil of cultural centers, which as a rule merely embitter and poison the taste for work; secondarily, because he always followed the narrow path which he had laid out for himself, unconcerned with current fads and changing fashions; and, finally, because with his temperament and with his beliefs as to the tasks of contemporary art, in his selection of subjects for poetry, and in his way of treating these subjects artistically, he has remained, to this day, a true son of the sixties and seventies of the last century, when work meant brisk activity, sincere feeling and a deep national interest. In those times the editing of poetry, educating to leadership and imparting resiliency of mood to the reading public were all inherent parts of a single whole. This is the reason why a majority of our literati of that time applied themselves to their work with much more enthusiasm and pleasure than those of today, when literary activity is merely flirted with because of the fact that by the distribution of one's books a national mission is fulfilled, and people derive pleasure from them and obtain an education at the same time.

    3

    Heyduk's literary work comprised epic and lyric poetry. Lyrics, however, play the formost part, and even in his epic there is a trace of lyricism.

    During the closing days of this month one of the most prolific and most popular among the Bohemian poets of the nineteenth century is nearing the seventieth year of his ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 e, III H
  • Denní Hlasatel -- March 14, 1907
    Literature

    p. 1--Attorney Thomas Capek, a well known Bohemian who has gained merit and fame among Bohemian-Americans for his scientific and political literature, has just completed a second volume of "Memories of Bohemian Emigrants in America." This book is published by a Bohemian printing concern in Omaha.

    Anybody who is interested in the history of the first Bohemian immigrants to America, cannot find a book anywhere at any price that will serve its purpose better than this book. Yet this book will sell at the nominal price of one dollar.

    It pictures and describes Bohemian immigration and emigration from the "White Mountain era" to the year 1848.

    The author states that this book is not a history, but just an addition to it.

    He claims that even more important facts about the Bohemian people could be discovered by some one who would have interest and time for research.

    This book is recommended to all Bohemian people in America.

    p. 1--Attorney Thomas Capek, a well known Bohemian who has gained merit and fame among Bohemian-Americans for his scientific and political literature, has just completed a second volume of "Memories ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 e, II B 2 d 3
  • Denní Hlasatel -- March 31, 1907
    Mr. Vladislav Florjansky.

    p. 2, col. 3.. During his tour of the United States this noted Bohemian operatic tenor honored us by stopping in Chicago. Mr. V. Florjansky is a former director of several European operas, gaining most of his fame in Prague, Czechoslovakia. In Prague he had the reputation of an excellent operatic singer. He has a large repertoire, consisting of about seventy operas. His ability was soon recognized by the largest opera houses of Europe which offered him attractive contracts, but Mr. V. Florjansky always gave preference to his own people.

    Now we find this artist on a concert tour of America. On his way to Chicago he has given Bohemian concerts in New York, Baltimore, Pittsburg, Cleveland, Buffalo, Detroit, Cedar Rapids and many other eastern cities. His concerts were so well liked in these cities that he had to promise to repeat them on his way back east.

    Mr. V. Florjansky is accompanied by Mr. F. Veselsky, a young but very accomplished pianist. Mr. F. Veselsky is a student of the Prague Conservatory and also studied piano in Vienna under the guidance of Professor Gruenfeld. Although he is young he has already gained fame during his tour of Czechoslovakia and England. Now he and Mr. V. Florjansky are rapidly winning acclaim for 2their concerts in America.

    These two Bohemian artists will give their Chicago concert on April 7, 1907, at the Czechoslovak-American Hall. It is expected that every Chicago Bohemian will take the opportunity to hear these celebrated artists, especially the chance to hear the wonderful voice of Mr. V. Florjansky. The best way to show our gratitude would be to fill the hall to capacity.

    p. 2, col. 3.. During his tour of the United States this noted Bohemian operatic tenor honored us by stopping in Chicago. Mr. V. Florjansky is a former director of ...

    Bohemian
    III H, II B 1 e
  • Denní Hlasatel -- April 14, 1907
    New Bohemian Club.

    p. 1 - col. 6.. An enthusiastic group of young Bohemian people of Chicago have organized a genuine national Bohemian Club, which will be known under the name of "Cest" (meaning Honor). The purpose of this club will be to educate its members, by teaching them the Bohemian language, by holding educational lectures, and by encouraging them to read Bohemian literature. It also intends to give theatrical plays annually or semi-annually, the proceeds of which would be turned over to some worthy cause as to some Bohemian benevolent undertaking.

    The aim of this club is indeed a lofty one. The hard work of this young group will surely bear fruit and the club will be a success, if all its members continue to work in the future, with such enthusiasm and harmony as they display at present.

    Mr. H. Farsky is given the most credit for the organization of this club, because it was his idea which originated it. He is a Bohemian teacher who has taken part in many Bohemian activities in Chicago.

    p. 1 - col. 6.. An enthusiastic group of young Bohemian people of Chicago have organized a genuine national Bohemian Club, which will be known under the name of "Cest" ...

    Bohemian
    III B 2, II B 1 c 1, II B 2 f, I A 1 b, II B 2 g, II D 1, III A, II B 1 e
  • Denní Hlasatel -- March 02, 1908
    In Memoriam: Svatopluk Cech.

    p. 1.. A great poet, philosopher, reformer and patriot, Svatopluk Cech has finished his earthly pilgrimage. The mournful news evoked a deep echo in the hearts of all American-Bohemians. They expressed their deepest sorrow in a dignified manner manifesting that they realized the loss of so great a Bohemian patriot.

    In memory of Svatopluk Cech, two meetings have been arranged in our Bohemian centers. One meeting was already held yesterday afternoon in the Bohemian-American Hall on 18th Street. The main speakers of this meeting were Messrs. Zdrubek and Iska. The other meeting will be held this coming Wednesday in Pilsen Sokol Hall and the speaker for this meeting will be Mr. Pelant, from Prague.

    There will be no charge for admission, so that our people will be represented to the fullest capacity of the hall; this will prove their admiration for our national patriots.

    p. 1.. A great poet, philosopher, reformer and patriot, Svatopluk Cech has finished his earthly pilgrimage. The mournful news evoked a deep echo in the hearts of all American-Bohemians. They ...

    Bohemian
    III B 2, II B 1 e, III H
  • Denní Hlasatel -- March 10, 1911
    Mr. Frantisek Fiser, Bohemian-American, Journalist, Author, and Distinguished Amateur Actor, Died Early Yesterday Morning

    The none-too-large community of Bohemian-American journalists and authors was again bereft of one of its members by death. Frantisek Fiser is no more. He died shortly before five o'clock yesterday morning. He died peacefully, quietly, being spared the painful struggle with death. He had been ill for several months, but had not given up hope of becoming well again. Likewise, his wife, Marie, and his children, Oldrich and bessie, were also convinced their beloved husband and father would recuperate, and be active again. However, fate decided otherwise, and Frantisek Fiser, to the great sorrow of his dear ones, and the great loss to Bohemian-American literature, did not recover. About three weeks ago, he was injured by a street care at 22nd Street and Kedzie Avenue, and there is no doubt that this injury, if not the direct cause of his death, hastened it. It is certain that before he met with the accident, he was recovering from his illness, and gaining strength, and had every reason to look forward to an early recovery. However, since the fateful day when he was dragged almost half a block by the 2street car, his condition grew steadily worse, and even though at times he seemed to be improving as was the case the day before his death, Frantisek Fiser was nearing the end. He has finished suffering, and has ended fighting. Yes, it can be said of him that he ended the fight and died like a soldier on the field of battle.

    We do not have many Bohemian men of letters in America, and of those, Frantisek Fiser was one of the best. In so far as original work was concerned, he wrote miniature stories mostly. Some of these we reprinted in our calendar. It was in these little stories, written in simple, understandable words, that Fiser's talent was best shown. Being an educated man, a graduate of the higher gymnasium in Kralovy Hradec, and an expert of the Czech language, he always endeavored honorably so that his works would influence others, and he was remarkably successful.

    In so far as larger works are concerned, he is known through a great many translations, all of which were very successful and sought after by all readers.

    3

    As an editor, he was a valuable force in any editorial room, and because of his clever pan and fine composition, he was never in want of a place.

    He came to America in 1888, and shortly after his arrival, accepted a position on the editorial staff of the Cechoslovan, a Catholic weekly published at that time by Victor [gap]eclik. Resigning from this position after a time, he traveled with his family to Omaha, and joined the staff of Osveta. But he longed for Chicago, and returned here taking a position on our staff. From there, he went to Nared. when the newspaper Jednota was founded, he became its editor. After the failure of that publication, he went to Cedar Rapids, where he published the Ceska Lipa. Later, he was a member of the editorial staff of the Lidovy Noviny, and of Svornost. Some time ago, he went to Milwaukee and joined the staff of Domacnost. He again returned to Chicago. However, he did not work for any newspaper after that, but devoted himself to literature exclusively.

    Frantisek Fiser will be remembered not only as a journalist and writer 4but also as a distinguished amateur actor. Those old lovers of the amateur theatre, wherever it still flourished, remember Frantisek Fiser well. Yes indeed, it is hardly possible to forget some of his roles, whether they be of a serious or comic character, which he portrayed on the stage. Let us recollect only his "Valenta" in "Palicov dceri," (The charcoal-burner's daughter) in which role he had no peer. The stage brought Fiser just as many friends as his activity as a journalist and writer; ala however, both brought only friendship and moral recognition. Otherwise, he had to struggle hard for an existence, and had to exert all his forces if he wished to have his family lack nothing.

    Of his ardent love for the homeland and for all things Bohemian, we have innumerable examples at hand. His library, of the choicest Bohemian works, speaks for all of these. It was nothing strange for Frantisek Fiser to use the last penny, if necessary, to acquire some Bohemian book.

    Frantisek Fiser was born in Studenec v Podkronosy, and was forty-seven years old at his death. As has been said, he came to America in 1888, 5accompanied by his wife. At that time, he became a member of St. Vaclav Society No. 65, First Catholic Central Union, and later, a member of the dramatic club, "Jablonsky."

    His funeral will be held Sunday morning at 9 o'clock from his former residence at 5050 South St. Louis Avenue, then to the Church of the Bohemian blessed Agnes, and from there to the Bohemian National Cemetery.

    The none-too-large community of Bohemian-American journalists and authors was again bereft of one of its members by death. Frantisek Fiser is no more. He died shortly before five o'clock yesterday ...

    Bohemian
    IV, II B 2 d 1, II B 1 e
  • Denní Hlasatel -- April 30, 1911
    Bohemian-American Literature

    Dr. Jaroslav E. Salaba Vojan, journalist and manager of the Ceske Tiskove Kancelare, (The Bohemian Press Bureau), also author of Velkeho New Yorky, wrote and published a new book, Cesko-Americke Epistoly (Bohemian-American Epistles). The writer dedicated this work to his wife, Olga, but we immediately note that he made a remarkable gift to Bohemian-American literature thereby. Bohemian-American literature is scarce, almost too scarce, so far as really worth-while works are concerned, and we welcome with sincerest joy its every enrichment with works of distinctive worth.

    Bohemian-American Epistles is such a work, even if we did not agree with some parts of its contents. For instance, we disagree with the author in his division of Bohemian-Americans into three groups. We agree that there is a group here which is rapidly and indifferently becoming denationalized. These people the author places in the first group. We also know, and agree with the author that there is another group of those who, although they are becoming 2adjusted to American habits and customs, are remaining sincere Bohemians, but we do not agree with the author that there is a third group, who are surrounding themselves with a veritable Chinese Wall against everything American and, under no consideration, want to admit that they are in any way duty-bound to this new country. True, there are such people here, but they do not and cannot create a group. They are merely strays, a few individuals, who simply can not be considered. Otherwise, we agree with the contents of the book to the last letter.

    Dr. Vojan sees correctly what we have, and what we lack. He judges remarkably the work accomplished by Bohemians in America, and we admit he is absolutely correct when he says that Bohemians in America are not a dying branch of the Bohemian people, and are not threatened with extinction as many Bohemian writers predicted, who, in former days, made a flying visit through America.

    Bohemian-American Epistles are written in a beautiful, easily understood style, and because the cover of the book is very fine, we do not doubt that 3it will become an adornment to every Bohemian-American library. We recommend it most heartily.

    Dr. Jaroslav E. Salaba Vojan, journalist and manager of the Ceske Tiskove Kancelare, (The Bohemian Press Bureau), also author of Velkeho New Yorky, wrote and published a new book, Cesko-Americke ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 d 3, II B 1 e, I C, IV