The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Svornost -- November 11, 1879
    Entertainment.

    The first theatrical entertainment to be given by "Sokol Cechie" (Bohemian Gymnasts) proved to be successful as was expected. The entire program was excellently given, if one takes into consideration, that this was the Sokol's first such effort. The comedy of itself was enough to keep the public satisfied.

    With this fine beginning, enthusiasm for the "Sokol Cechie" among the public will no doubt be multiplied many fold.

    The first theatrical entertainment to be given by "Sokol Cechie" (Bohemian Gymnasts) proved to be successful as was expected. The entire program was excellently given, if one takes into consideration, ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 c 1, II B 3
  • Svornost -- November 11, 1879
    The Pastoral Play "Kriz V Potoka"

    (The Cross By The Brook) given last night was enjoyed by an overflowing attendance of a select part of our public. The play presents a charming picture of country-life, and the participants were accorded a hearty acknowledgement for their efforts. Especially "Evicka" (Eva) as played by Mrs. M. Vaskova, and"Stepan Potockych " (Stephan Potocky) as played by Mr. Koerner, who were accorded the highest laurels of the evening.

    Through we have not seen Mrs. Marie Vaskova play in recent years we were able to recognize in her characterizations the same dynamic force as of yore. Mr. J. Benes played the part of "Ambroz" with utmost perfection, and Miss Papik playing the part of "Marian" was also very much liked. Mr. E. Hasse was very original in his portrayal of the "Landlord." Miss A, Jurkova was excellent in her characterization of the "Miller's Daughter." The various other characters were a great help in rounding out 2a fine performance. The decorations were beautiful. Since this is the last performance under the direction of Mr. James Kostner, it is hoped that under the new director the Bohemian Theatre may be equally successful.

    (The Cross By The Brook) given last night was enjoyed by an overflowing attendance of a select part of our public. The play presents a charming picture of country-life, and ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 c 1
  • Svornost -- November 17, 1879
    Theatrical & Entertainment.

    The Theatrical given by the pupils of the Bohemian Sunday School (at the Lime Kilns) was a success in all respects. Even though it was the first time that the pupils appeared before the public, they carried on as though they had previous experience behind the foot-lights. The public attended in large numbers and the efforts of the amateurs were received with great applause, for they really surprised every one with their fine work. Besides the theatrical presentation there were a number of speeches made and some singing was offered which met with approval.

    After the performance Mr. John Pavel presented the teacher of this school with a beautiful golden ring given by the pupils in appreciation of his industrious efforts in teaching them.

    The dancing program lasted until late in the night. We trust that the school, to which we wish great success, will in the near future again venture before the public with some lengthier play.

    The Theatrical given by the pupils of the Bohemian Sunday School (at the Lime Kilns) was a success in all respects. Even though it was the first time that the ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 f, II B 1 c 1
  • Svornost -- June 24, 1880
    "C.S.P.S." Convention. 3rd Day

    There was nothing much that would be of interest to the general public in yesterday's session of the C.S.P.S. convention.

    Shortly after one o'clock the delegates attended the funeral of Bro. Jos. Vutika, of #208 West 19th Street, and in the evening for the most part, they attended a theatrical performance, given in the honor of them, by the (Reading Club) "Ctenarsky Spolek".

    There was nothing much that would be of interest to the general public in yesterday's session of the C.S.P.S. convention. Shortly after one o'clock the delegates attended the funeral of ...

    Bohemian
    II D 1, II B 1 c 1, II B 1 d
  • Svornost -- July 09, 1883
    In Memory of Jan Hus.

    Saturday, July 7, the memory of Jan Hus was solemnly celebrated in the Pilzen Sokol Hall. As a start there was shown a dramatic play by J. Kaj. Tyl, entitled "Jan Hus" presented very successfully. The main characters were in the hands of experienced ameteurs: Sophie, wife of King Vaclav IV, was played by Mrs. H. Stejskal; the part of Marketa, Hus' mother, was presented by Mrs. M. Vaskova; Jan Hus by F. B. Zdrubek; Jan Zizka by A. Pregler; Petro Angelo, Cardinal and Pope's delegate, was played by Jos. Zak. All these amateurs were well-known as dramatically experienced.

    Strange as it may seem, the editors of Svornost were partaking in the play and each was very busy with the interpretation of his part in the drama - as Zikmund, the German Emperor; the Roman Catholic Pope, Jan XXIII, the Archbishop of Praha, and consequently, all our editors condemned Jan Hus, portrayed by the chief editor, F. B. Zdrubek.

    It is so impossible for us to give the correct details or the real criticism of the play because every one of the editors was so absorbed with his own 2part that is was simply impossible for him to observe critically the interpretation of other actors and it is not our wish to praise ourselves. The hall was over-filled. All intelligent Bohemians were present; we don't know what had attracted the public more - the drama or the editors of Svornost.

    The second part of the celebration, the dance, finished late in the night, will be remembered for a long time by the countrymen.

    Saturday, July 7, the memory of Jan Hus was solemnly celebrated in the Pilzen Sokol Hall. As a start there was shown a dramatic play by J. Kaj. Tyl, entitled ...

    Bohemian
    III B 3 a, II B 1 c 1, IV
  • Svornost -- August 19, 1883
    The Bohemian School in the 8th Ward

    "Now we are able to keep up a Bohemian school in the 8th ward." With these words the Bohemian school started, being supported by the Ladies' Educational Club Calliope.

    Why are we able "now"? Have we not in Chicago 35,000 Bohemians, half of them liberal thinkers? Have not the Catholics fourteen schools, six Bohemian and eight English? Have not the Catholics two Bohemian and three English in the 8th ward? There are fewer Catholic Bohemians than liberal thinkers. Are the liberal thinkers worse than the Catholics?

    There are in Chicago fifty-two liberal thinking societies with more than 6,000 members. This entire community has one English-Bohemian free liberal school supported by the Czecho-Slovak Pilzen Sokol. This school is frequented by seventy to ninety boys and girls, which makes one pupil to 2every seventy to eighty members of the societies. The 8th ward alone can be proud of eighteen societies, two national halls, but not a single school. Eighteen societies should certainly be able to support more than one school. Would they unite and work uniformly for the general progress. Would the purpose of the society Calliope be fulfilled, i. e., would all Bohemian liberal thinking societies be united for the purpose of maintaining and keeping up the Bohemian schools? It would be wholly possible to have one Bohemian school in every part of the city, no matter if it were an every day or a Sunday school. It would be necessary to make only a little sacrifice on the part of each society, and the future of the Bohemian population in Chicago would be protected.

    Let us consider that we have here the Bohemian theater. How can we understand the theater if we don't know the Bohemian language? It is impossible to know the virtues of our theater if we have no school where we can learn the Bohemian language. How can we expect the boys and girls to frequent the Bohemian theater when we neglect to implant love for the mother language in the delicate hearts of our children?

    3

    The theater is a temple of knowledge, where each race learns to recognize itself. How can we learn about things that our race has accomplished without knowing the Bohemian language? Now that the public school vacations have begun, the society Calliope opened a school in the headquarters of the Bohemian-American Sokol. The school rooms at the headquarters of this organization would qualify better for any other purpose than for the school. It is too bad but it seems that the serious obligations of the enterprise are too great for such a new society, especially when we consider that it is one of the poorest societies, financially, in Chicago. This school, in spite of its handicaps, should be morally supported by parents who have high patriotic feelings. They should send their children to it. At present there are forty-one pupils of both sexes in active attendance.

    Miss Klara Rottova accepted the duties of teaching, which she is performing with sacrifice and magnanimity, overcoming innumerable obstacles and fulfilling her obligations to the satisfaction of the school committee of the society and of the parents.

    4

    Now we are appealing to all patriotic clubs and societies to act jointly and to remove all obstacles in the great problem of maintaining the Bohemian schools, and the future of the Bohemian population in Chicago. In unity there is life, in division there is death.

    "Now we are able to keep up a Bohemian school in the 8th ward." With these words the Bohemian school started, being supported by the Ladies' Educational Club Calliope. Why ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 f, II B 1 c 1, II A 3 d 1, II D 1, III C, III A
  • Svornost -- September 24, 1883
    Hamlet on the Bohemian Stage.

    Yesterday the society, Jednota presented "Hamlet". The main character was played by one of the best amateurs, Josef Kerner, who bade us farewell. This explains the extremely large attendance. - The Bohemians have proved that they understand how to honor an amateur, who always has offered his services with extreme zeal and unselfishness, and always responded, when he was summoned for a public appearance.

    Not long ago we expressed a decision on the serious responsibility of featuring Shakespeare on the amateur stage, and we have decided not to write any criticism of similar enterprises. But to our surprise the play of last night was exceptionally excellent. It was a quiet glorification of our most diligent worker of the stage and, at the same time , the farewell to him.

    That Mr. Kerner had studied, especially, the part of "Hamlet" was easily seen from his interpretation and only yesterday, we understood what a big portrayer of dramatic character will be lost to our Bohemian amateur theater.

    2

    It is too bad, so much the worse, as we never will have an amateur who would sacrifice so much. Mr. Kerner's interpretation of any character was absolutely conscientious. - He was, so to say, a white raven, a blessed exception. - We are very sorry to be losing such an authority. The audience expressed its satisfaction by loud applause, and Mr. Kerner was much applauded after each appearance on the stage, but that was all.

    Anyhow, the world is ungrateful. For so many sacrifices, for such faithful work for our people, not a little wreath, not a green leaf, was presented to our beloved amateur as a proof of the gratitude and appreciation of our community.

    The Bohemians are not sensitive, they have good will, but must be animated by someone.

    In another city, where there is, maybe, one half of the numbers of Chicago's Bohemians, such an occasion would not pass so coldheartedly.

    3

    Our amateur earned, certainly, an open public gratitude, and yesterday was the right day to show to him our appreciation and gratitude. In spite of unfavorable weather the hall was filled to capacity. There was no room to stand. "Hamlet" was a surprise to us. We never expected such a good performance.

    While we don't intend to spoil the good impression we will not mention the mistakes, which in many instances were, alas, not small, that's why we are finishing this article with our heartiest wishes to Mr. Kerner for best success and prosperity.

    Yesterday the society, Jednota presented "Hamlet". The main character was played by one of the best amateurs, Josef Kerner, who bade us farewell. This explains the extremely large attendance. - ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 c 1
  • Svornost -- April 14, 1884
    The Theaters

    Six successful plays were given by the Bohemians yesterday. In the Sokol Hall was produced a very difficult play, "Rewisor" (The Comptroller), played to the complete enjoyment of the audience. The dramatic society Kolar (Cyclist) played "Svedove Na Morave" (The Swedes in Moravia), with great success. Those that played the major roles were without reproach. In the hall of the Bohemian-American Sokol was played the drama "Katovo Posledni Dilo" (Hangman's Last Deed). The citizens on the West Side had a wonderful entertainment arranged by the All-Bohemian Youth. We expressed here our opinion generally, a more detailed explanation would demand too much space.

    Six successful plays were given by the Bohemians yesterday. In the Sokol Hall was produced a very difficult play, "Rewisor" (The Comptroller), played to the complete enjoyment of the audience. ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 c 1, III E
  • Svornost -- June 02, 1884
    Celebration of the 30th Anniversary of the Czecho-Slovak Benevolent Societies

    The thirtieth anniversary of the founding of the Czecho-Slovak benevolent societies was celebrated yesterday in the large building of the Bohemian school. The school building was beautifully decorated with garlands of wintergreen and with national flags. Over 500 spectators were present. The main speakers were J. F. Sprosty, chairman of the main administration office; J. A. Schleiss, secretary of the office, and L. J. Palda, of Cedar Rapids, as well as the chairmen of the Chicago branch offices.

    Between the speeches the singing society Lumir delivered beautiful Bohemian songs. This association was organized in St. Louis in 1854 with 300 members. Now there are 16 lodges, 110 branch societies and 7,000 members.

    2

    Illinois alone has twenty-one societies and of this number sixteen are in Chicago with a total number of 2,000 members. This association pays $750 in case of the husband's death, or total disability, and $250 in case of the wife's death. Besides this the association takes care of the orphans and maintains a school. The celebration finished with the play, "Primator," presented by the club Kolar (Cyclist), for the first time in Chicago.

    The thirtieth anniversary of the founding of the Czecho-Slovak benevolent societies was celebrated yesterday in the large building of the Bohemian school. The school building was beautifully decorated with garlands ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 c 3, II B 1 c 1, II B 1 a, II D 1, II D 4
  • Svornost -- March 24, 1885
    Dramatic School.

    Last Sunday we visited with pleasure the dramatic school on 18th Street, where the director of this theater, Mr. Fr. Kosak, has gathered thirty pupils, fifteen boys and fifteen young girls, whom he is coaching in declamation, recitation, rhetoric, and dramatic art. He educates them as good amateurs for our Bohemian theater, which will interpret to the Bohemian people the works of Bohemian dramatic authors.

    They will make their first public appearance in a short time to demonstrate the progress they have made by their zealous and diligent studies. By doing this they will enlist themselves in the national service, by cultivating the dramatic art they will educate themselves and help to educate and elevate the entire nation.

    Last Sunday we visited with pleasure the dramatic school on 18th Street, where the director of this theater, Mr. Fr. Kosak, has gathered thirty pupils, fifteen boys and fifteen young ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 c 1, II A 3 d 1