The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Svornost -- June 03, 1878
    [Reading Club Commemorates the Death of Voltaire]

    The Reading Club commemorated the one hundredth Anniversary of the death of Voltaire, exhibiting a large portrait of him and reading several of his shorter works. Because of rain, attendance was small.

    We were much surprised at the skill of our young and modest artist, Miss M. Koupalove.

    Using a small portrait as a model, she completed, in two hours, a large painting for the club. She is certainly deserving of recognition and encourgement to proceed to further success.

    The Reading Club commemorated the one hundredth Anniversary of the death of Voltaire, exhibiting a large portrait of him and reading several of his shorter works. Because of rain, attendance ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 d, II B 1 b, II B 1 e, IV
  • Denní Hlasatel -- December 20, 1903
    Bohemian Artists.

    No doubt the report of the organization of a Bohemian Artists Society, bearing the name of one of the greatest living Bohemian masters, will interest our public in the greatest degree. The number of artists in our midst continues to grow and become more powerful, in this respect we can boast that we have far surpassed many other nationalities. The number of creative artists is increasing unusually rapidly and of these, painters decisively occupy first place. These young artists finally came to the realization that it will be for better for them, and for art in particular, if they are united in one strong organization. The work of organizing the Bohemian artists had been going on for a long time until finally on the 22nd of Sep. the Mikulas Ales society of Bohemian artists was organized.

    The society will meet every Sunday morning between 8:00 and 11:30 A.M. in the Bohemian-American Hall at 588 West 18th street. At these meetings, lectures will be given about art and at the same time drawings from models will be done. For the membership this will be not only entertainment but excellent practice. As we are informed, it is the goal of this society to hold expositions twice each year, in spring and fall.

    2

    Every Bohemian painter may become a member of this society by merely paying fifty cents a month dues, no initiation fee is required. At the time of the organization of this society the following officers were elected: Jan Jirse, Chairman. Ladies are also accepted in the society and many of them applied. This is a welcome revelation, because it convinces us that our Bohemian ladies are in nowise remaining behind, going forward with exemplary determination in everything, also in art.

    No doubt the report of the organization of a Bohemian Artists Society, bearing the name of one of the greatest living Bohemian masters, will interest our public in the greatest ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 b, I K
  • Denní Hlasatel -- July 23, 1911
    Young Bohemian Artist

    Without any flattery, we must recognize that seventeen year old countryman, Karel Weiss, of 4511 South Wood Street, is gifted with an unusual talent for painting. He is the oldest of five children of Mr. Leopold Weiss, who owns and operates a variety store and barber shop at that address.

    Young Karel has had an unusual liking for painting ever since the age of five, and he has saved some paintings from the period during which he attended public school. Up to this time, he had not yet received any training in the art which merits recognition. Later, after he had graduated from public school, he entered the Art Institute, where he studied for one year. At present, he works in his own atelier, in the home of his father. He is working to complete a scene taken from nature. The young artist especially excels in landscape painting.

    2

    Mr. Weiss has his paintings on exhibition in his father's place of business, some of which are offered for sale. We wish our young countryman much success.

    Without any flattery, we must recognize that seventeen year old countryman, Karel Weiss, of 4511 South Wood Street, is gifted with an unusual talent for painting. He is the oldest ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 b, IV
  • Denní Hlasatel -- September 11, 1911
    Joseph Tomanek Talented Czech Artist in Chicago

    The ranks of Czech artists in America have been increased by one of our countrymen whose handling of brushes is a real art. We had the opportunity to make the acquaintance of this artist in the atelier of Mr. Vladimir Shamberk (Vladimir Samberk) located in Kimball Hall in the person of Mr. Joseph Tomanek. Mr. Tomanek was schooled in the art of interior decorating in the old country. This trade did not satisfy Mr. Tomanek. For that reason, he began to train himself in his art with water colors.

    Mr. Tomanek came to America about a year ago, and made his living by hard work such as almost every intelligent immigrant finds to be almost a necessity. He visited the atelier of Mr. Shamberk and asked to be allowed to complete his education in painting and to receive instruction so that he could make use of his talents. He showed Mr. Shamberk some of his water colors. Mr. Shamberk examined the work, and finding that he had real ability, accepted him into his atelier where he completed his training in painting. It can 2now be said of Mr. Tomanek that he is a real artist.

    We saw some of his paintings, outstanding of which are his "Othello and Desdemono," "Tarantela," a portrait of "Tolstoy," and many picturesque landscapes from the vicinity of Brookfield.....

    Mr. Joseph Tomanek is twenty-two years of age, and was born in Straznice, Hodonina, Moravia.

    He came to America from Praha, where he was employed before coming to this country.

    The ranks of Czech artists in America have been increased by one of our countrymen whose handling of brushes is a real art. We had the opportunity to make the ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 b, IV
  • Denní Hlasatel -- December 31, 1911
    Bohemian Art Club

    The meeting to organize the Bohemian Art Club, the need for which has been felt, and the creation of which will aid in carrying out many worth-while projects, took place in Chicago on December 27.

    It was unanimously agreed upon by all who were present that this new society, which in no way competes with any existing Czech society, because Czech artists of Chicago have thus far been without any sort of an association, will develop into a desirable, friendly community in our city devoted to Czech art. It will be able to perform very important services for our cultural development.

    The following individuals participated in a discussion dealing with the problem of organizing the Club: representing the musicians were Messrs. Adolph H. Capek, Vaclav Machek, and Jiri Hrusa--requests to be excused were received from Joseph Vilim, Stepan Erst, A. Novak, Mario J. Korbel and Rudolph F. Ingerle; the creative artists, Professor Antonin Sterba, August Petrtyl, Joseph Patek; 2the architects, Messrs. A. Charvat and James B. Rezny; the stage, Mr. F. Horlivy; and the literary men, Messrs. Enrique S. Vraz, Dr. Jaroslav E. S. Vojan, J. Tvrzicky-Kramer and Bretislav Jonas--requests to be excused were received from Messrs. R. J. Psenka and Bartos Bittner. Temporary officers, who are to serve until the regular election will be held on January 10, 1912 were elected. They are: Dr. Jaroslav E. S. Vojan, president, and Jiri Hrusa, secretary. With the unanimous consent of those present, the president announced the establishment of the new society. It will be called the "Bohemian Arts Club". On a motion of Mr. E. S. Vraz it was unanimously agreed that the Club will also be known as "The Art and Literary Department of the Cesko-Americka Narodni Rada (Bohemian-American National Council) of Chicago". The president and secretary, therefore, will serve on the executive committee of the Cesko-Americka Narodni Rada. The Arts Club, however, will be a self-governing independent body.

    It was then decided that the Club be divided into five departments: music, creative painting and sculpture, architecture, drama and literature. The 3Club committee will consist of the five representatives from these departments, and the president and secretary who will be elected by the members. The committee for the preparation of the bylaws elected was composed of Messrs. Charvat, Petrtyl, Capek and Vojan. The next meeting will be held on Wednesday, January 10, 1912 in Mr. Welky's place. After the constitution and bylaws have been accepted, the public will be furnished with detailed information regarding the purposes of the Club. In many ways its program will be much the same as that followed by the Prague Arts Club; but, of course, many adjustments will be made to suit our own Bohemian-American conditions. On a motion of Mr. F. Horlivy one of the bylaws will provide that great care be taken by the Arts Club to preserve its genuine Czech characteristics--a purpose naturally desired by the Bohemian Arts Club.

    The meeting to organize the Bohemian Art Club, the need for which has been felt, and the creation of which will aid in carrying out many worth-while projects, took place ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 a, II B 1 c 1, II B 1 b, II B 1 d, III B 2, IV
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 16, 1913
    Annual Plenary Meeting of the Bohemian Arts Club of Chicago

    Last Sunday afternoon, the Bohemian Arts Club of Chicago held its first annual plenary meeting which was well attended by the membership. The violin virtuoso Jaroslav Kocian, and Professor Karel Veleminsky, who came toward the end of the meeting, were especially welcome guests.

    The meeting was opened by the president, Dr. Jaroslav E. Salaba Vojan, who presented a resume of the Club's work during its first year. All objectives as set up in the bylaws were being pursued: Fellowship among the members was being promoted by meetings like the Smetana evening in Korbel's Studio, the musicale in the auditorium of the Art Institute, and Ales party in Sterba's Studio. For the general public, the Vrchlicky evening was arranged in cooperation with the [Cesko-Americka] Narodni Rada (Bohemian-American National Council) and the Cesko-Americka Tiskova Kancelar (Bohemian-American Press 2Bureau). The members were active in the banquet in honor of Count Frankish Luzon, at the meeting of the Cesko-Americka Narodni Rada, etc. Newspaper articles, such as the president's recent article on Ales [Translator's note: Vaclav Ales, famous Bohemian painter] in the Daily News, will be continued. The resume was unanimously approved and [the Club's] appreciation expressed to the president.

    The president then asked the meeting to rise in memory of Mr. Bartos Bitner and Mr. J. Patek. There followed then the unanimous re-election of Dr. Vojan (for the committee on Literature) as president; Mr.A. Sterba (for the committee on Creative Arts) as vice-president; and Mr. J. Mrazek (for the committee on Architecture) as organizer and recorder. A motion to amend the bylaws by an article concerning contributing members was adopted. The Club will now admit as members friends of the arts who will have the right to attend all concerts, social evenings, and all other undertakings of the Club. The dues will amount to five dollars a year, and admission to membership will 3be decided by a committee of five members composed of Mr. V. Machek for the Committee on Music, Mr. R. J. Psenka for Committee on Literature, Mr. Frantisek Randak for Committee on Architecture, Mr. Antonin Petrtyl for Committee on Creative Arts, and President Vojan.

    Last Sunday afternoon, the Bohemian Arts Club of Chicago held its first annual plenary meeting which was well attended by the membership. The violin virtuoso Jaroslav Kocian, and Professor Karel ...

    Bohemian
    III B 2, II B 1 a, II B 1 b, II B 1 d, III H, IV
  • Denní Hlasatel -- October 23, 1915
    Silver Cup Contest

    As we have mentioned briefly before, the amateur-photographer members of the Ceske Narodni Sdruzeni are organizing a gala night which will be held sometime next month and at which the distribution of prizes of a photographic contest will take place. It will be the first night of its kind in Bohemian America, and the prizes awarded will be well worth preserving by all their winners.

    There will be an entertaining program arranged for the evening, and the whole affair will be a social event of the first order, perhaps the red-letter day of our social season.....

    Following are the rules of the contest. All our photographers should clip them out and save.....

    2

    Rules of the Contest of Bohemian Amateur Photographers

    The contest will take place in the second half of the month of November.

    The prizes that will be awarded to the exhibitors of the best amateur photographs are:

    1) A silver cup and the title of champion of Chicago Bohemian amateur photographers. The cup will be the winner's property.

    2) Travel camera, value, at least $15.

    3) Bronze trophy.

    4) Field glass.

    5) Enlargement and framing of the photograph awarded this prize 3Photographs to be submitted must be the work of countrymen from Chicago and vicinity who have never been professional photographers.....

    The prizes will be awarded by a jury consisting of Bohemian professional photographers and members of the building arts committee of the Cesky Umelecky Klub (Bohemian Arts Club).....

    The net profit of the contest and the whole evening at which the prize distribution will take place will go to the Ceske Narodni Sdruzeni (Bohemian National Alliance) as a gift of Bohemian amateur photographers and of those countrymen who are donating the prizes.....

    All communications should be directed to the Ceske Narodni Sdruzeni at 3639 West 26th Street, at the corner of Millard Avenue.....

    As we have mentioned briefly before, the amateur-photographer members of the Ceske Narodni Sdruzeni are organizing a gala night which will be held sometime next month and at which the ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 b, III B 2, II B 3
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 30, 1916
    Z Umeleckeho Klubu

    Cesky Umelecky Klub (The Czech Artistic Club) in Chicago held its regular meeting January 26, 1916, with which it closed its fourth year of active service.

    A vote of thanks was extended to the following outgoing officers for work well done: Mr. Charvat, chairman; Mr. Petrtyl, vice-chairman; Mr. Kryl, secretary; Mr. Mrazek, treasurer, and Mr. Svoboda, librarian.

    We wish to make known the future activities decided on at this meeting: the club publication, Jednou Za Cas (Once In A While), which now has twelve pages, will be published in the same form, and Artists Petrtyl, Sterba, Ingerle, Froula, Bohunek, and others have promised to work energetically for the publication.

    The following action was taken with respect to Dvorak Park, which is named in 2memory of the great composer Dvorak: a committee of two was selected to investigate the particulars regarding the portrait of Dvorak which the Cesky Umelecky Klub expects to furnish by means of donations for that purpose. This portrait is to remain in Dvorak Park as long as the park bears the great musician's name.

    The following activities, the April Shakespearean celebration, the March artists' evening in Mr. Sterba's atelier, and the cycle of popular lectures, all will be acted upon at the next club meeting, February 9.

    The officers elected for the year 1916 are as follows: Chairman, unanimously elected, Mr. J. E. S. Vojan; vice-chairman, Mr. A. Sterba; secretary, Mr. Frantisek Horlivy; treasurer, Mr. V. A. Cerny, and librarian, M. J. M. Mrazek. The gentlemen named represent the following art divisions: literary, productive, dramatic, musical, and architectural.

    The next meeting will be held Wednesday February 9, and will commence the fifth 3year of the club's activity. The participation of all members in the next meeting is greatly desired.

    Cesky Umelecky Klub (The Czech Artistic Club) in Chicago held its regular meeting January 26, 1916, with which it closed its fourth year of active service. A vote of thanks ...

    Bohemian
    II A 3 c, II B 2 d 2, II A 3 b, II B 1 a, II B 1 d, II B 1 b
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 09, 1917
    Czechs Among the First

    The YMCA held a fair in its building, 3210 Arthington Street, a gift by Rosenwald, during the days from Dec. 29, 1916 to Jan. 1, 1917. The exhibition which stood under the sign of "Crafts and Arts," brought many samples of skill and talent before the eyes of the visitors, who had come in great numbers, to which men prominent in their vocations contributed a large contingent. The arrangement committee consisted of some members most influential in the association, which may be called the biggest of its kind in the United States. Only objects of merit were placed on exhibition.

    There were two divisions: one for grammar and one for high schools. In the former we did not encounter the work of a single pupil of Czech descent by either close or distant relationship. In the high school division, on the 2contrary, there were long rows of work done by Czech pupils and they were being discussed with utmost interest. There was a printer's roller made by Julius Bizik, of Crane High School which was awarded the second prize. The first prize in the Carpenter's Section was won jointly by Josef Prochazka, and Karel Luire. In the Patterns' Section it was Jan Stastny who received the first prize.

    Pupils of the C. H. Harrison High School, however, won the highest honors. Among these, Anton Coufal, of 3614 W. 26th Street, son of the well-known choir director and light-opera conductor, distinguished himself by winning two prizes in the Art Section, in which another Czech-American, J. Vopat, came into prominence. We are giving these names to the public because by doing so we are giving well-deserved publicity to the young men and a stimulus for the further pursuit of their ambitious aims.

    The YMCA held a fair in its building, 3210 Arthington Street, a gift by Rosenwald, during the days from Dec. 29, 1916 to Jan. 1, 1917. The exhibition which stood ...

    Bohemian
    I A 1 a, II B 1 c 3, II B 1 b
  • Denní Hlasatel -- June 08, 1917
    Young Artist Is Honored (Summary)

    Mr. Ignaz M. Sahula, of 1255 South Komensky Avenue, Novy Tabor, a Chicago suburb, was one of the students of the Art Institute who competed for a prize for the best posters to be used by the United States recruiting service. He received a very flattering letter only a few days ago which was signed by Captain F. R. Kenney, chief of the United States recruiting service for the Chicago district. The message informed him that he was at the top of the list of those who received honorable mention in the competition. His poster depicts the Statue of Liberty, before whom lies a town in flames. A young soldier with his bugle calling others to their duty stands in the foreground. There is an appropriate inscription.....

    Mr. Ignaz M. Sahula, of 1255 South Komensky Avenue, Novy Tabor, a Chicago suburb, was one of the students of the Art Institute who competed for a prize for the ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 b, I G