The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Svornost -- June 18, 1878
    [Bohemian Actress Leaves for Homeland]

    Miss Teresa Hovarka who for four years has been busily engaged upon local Bohemian stages leaves to-day upon a journey to her native land.

    She will visit at "Kolin" her birthplace.

    Miss Teresa Hovarka who for four years has been busily engaged upon local Bohemian stages leaves to-day upon a journey to her native land. She will visit at "Kolin" her ...

    Bohemian
    II A 3 d 1
  • Svornost -- December 20, 1881
    Vaclav Denoch

    Vaclav Lenoch, died in the county hospital in Milwaukee, Wis. He was widely known in Bohemian-American circles as one of our foremost actors. He was born in 1846 and came to America in 1869, living in Chicago intermittently. About two years ago he moved to Racine and from there to Milwaukee.

    The theatre was his universe; all his powers, all his existence and his very life were dedicated to the theatre. How well he knew the theatre! With his comedy he caused tears and laughter, and with his tragedy, tears of sorrow and city. Vaclav Lenoch was uncommonly talented in many ways; he painted, wrote, translated and composed poetry. Our foremost post, V. Snajdr, praised several of Lenoch's poems and published them in his paper.

    Lenoch was a contributor to "Ducha Casus and to "Svornost": he translated the theatrical play, "Robert and Bertram", and in other ways took part in our nationalistic movement.

    Vaclav Lenoch, died in the county hospital in Milwaukee, Wis. He was widely known in Bohemian-American circles as one of our foremost actors. He was born in 1846 and came ...

    Bohemian
    IV, II A 3 d 1, II B 1 e
  • Svornost -- August 19, 1883
    The Bohemian School in the 8th Ward

    "Now we are able to keep up a Bohemian school in the 8th ward." With these words the Bohemian school started, being supported by the Ladies' Educational Club Calliope.

    Why are we able "now"? Have we not in Chicago 35,000 Bohemians, half of them liberal thinkers? Have not the Catholics fourteen schools, six Bohemian and eight English? Have not the Catholics two Bohemian and three English in the 8th ward? There are fewer Catholic Bohemians than liberal thinkers. Are the liberal thinkers worse than the Catholics?

    There are in Chicago fifty-two liberal thinking societies with more than 6,000 members. This entire community has one English-Bohemian free liberal school supported by the Czecho-Slovak Pilzen Sokol. This school is frequented by seventy to ninety boys and girls, which makes one pupil to 2every seventy to eighty members of the societies. The 8th ward alone can be proud of eighteen societies, two national halls, but not a single school. Eighteen societies should certainly be able to support more than one school. Would they unite and work uniformly for the general progress. Would the purpose of the society Calliope be fulfilled, i. e., would all Bohemian liberal thinking societies be united for the purpose of maintaining and keeping up the Bohemian schools? It would be wholly possible to have one Bohemian school in every part of the city, no matter if it were an every day or a Sunday school. It would be necessary to make only a little sacrifice on the part of each society, and the future of the Bohemian population in Chicago would be protected.

    Let us consider that we have here the Bohemian theater. How can we understand the theater if we don't know the Bohemian language? It is impossible to know the virtues of our theater if we have no school where we can learn the Bohemian language. How can we expect the boys and girls to frequent the Bohemian theater when we neglect to implant love for the mother language in the delicate hearts of our children?

    3

    The theater is a temple of knowledge, where each race learns to recognize itself. How can we learn about things that our race has accomplished without knowing the Bohemian language? Now that the public school vacations have begun, the society Calliope opened a school in the headquarters of the Bohemian-American Sokol. The school rooms at the headquarters of this organization would qualify better for any other purpose than for the school. It is too bad but it seems that the serious obligations of the enterprise are too great for such a new society, especially when we consider that it is one of the poorest societies, financially, in Chicago. This school, in spite of its handicaps, should be morally supported by parents who have high patriotic feelings. They should send their children to it. At present there are forty-one pupils of both sexes in active attendance.

    Miss Klara Rottova accepted the duties of teaching, which she is performing with sacrifice and magnanimity, overcoming innumerable obstacles and fulfilling her obligations to the satisfaction of the school committee of the society and of the parents.

    4

    Now we are appealing to all patriotic clubs and societies to act jointly and to remove all obstacles in the great problem of maintaining the Bohemian schools, and the future of the Bohemian population in Chicago. In unity there is life, in division there is death.

    "Now we are able to keep up a Bohemian school in the 8th ward." With these words the Bohemian school started, being supported by the Ladies' Educational Club Calliope. Why ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 f, II B 1 c 1, II A 3 d 1, II D 1, III C, III A
  • Svornost -- March 24, 1885
    Dramatic School.

    Last Sunday we visited with pleasure the dramatic school on 18th Street, where the director of this theater, Mr. Fr. Kosak, has gathered thirty pupils, fifteen boys and fifteen young girls, whom he is coaching in declamation, recitation, rhetoric, and dramatic art. He educates them as good amateurs for our Bohemian theater, which will interpret to the Bohemian people the works of Bohemian dramatic authors.

    They will make their first public appearance in a short time to demonstrate the progress they have made by their zealous and diligent studies. By doing this they will enlist themselves in the national service, by cultivating the dramatic art they will educate themselves and help to educate and elevate the entire nation.

    Last Sunday we visited with pleasure the dramatic school on 18th Street, where the director of this theater, Mr. Fr. Kosak, has gathered thirty pupils, fifteen boys and fifteen young ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 c 1, II A 3 d 1
  • Svornost -- May 28, 1885
    The Theater Ship.

    During the whole of last year there was a movement among the Bohemian citizens of Chicago to arrange a general excursion to the old country; the originators of this idea worked hard, until they realized their undertaking when the time came to start the journey, numerous Bohemians arrived in Chicago from all western states, Nebraska, Kansas, Wisconsin, Iowa, Missouri; and so forth, to join the excursion which is starting from Chicago. The management of the excursion was in the hands of Mr. Tomas Kral and Mr. Frant Cemus of Chicago. The participants gathered together yesterday at 6 P.M. at the corner of 19th and Morgan Sts. accompanied by eight local Bohemian societies. The members of the excursion, numbering 200-250 people, marched in a gay procession to the Grand Trunk Depot, there to board a train for New York. A few short farewell speeches were delivered.

    The main destination of the excursion is the Bohemian capital, Prague, and the visiting of the new national theater there, erected and opened for the public last year.

    2

    This theater, Narodni Divadlo, will have gala performances, arranged especially in honor of the guests from the United States.

    It is understood, that the members of the excursion will visit their families abroad and their birthplaces.

    During the whole of last year there was a movement among the Bohemian citizens of Chicago to arrange a general excursion to the old country; the originators of this idea ...

    Bohemian
    III H, II A 3 d 1
  • Svornost -- January 02, 1896
    [Ludwig's Society Gives Romantic Drama]

    "Eudwig's Society" started yesterday a New Year presenting on the stage a romantic drama entitled "A Nun Buried Alive" or "Knights Of the Cross In the Holy Land". Said play is very old and used to be played on the amateur stages years ago.

    The members of the society prepared beautiful costumes; nice and new sceneries adorned the stage. The interpretation of the main characters was good as always, the monologues were faultless, especially Mrs. Splavcova, Mrs. Lescinska and Mrs. Kollanska, also Mr. Novak, Splavcow and Fisher.

    Next Sunday there will be played a farce," Grocery Woman of 18th Place."

    "Eudwig's Society" started yesterday a New Year presenting on the stage a romantic drama entitled "A Nun Buried Alive" or "Knights Of the Cross In the Holy Land". Said play ...

    Bohemian
    II A 3 d 1
  • Svornost -- December 03, 1899
    B. E. Janovsky

    Merciless death again mowed down one of the young workers in the national field, and thereby took him from the arms of his beloved family at a time when, after hard work, his duties were easing somewhat. B. E. Janovsky was truly a self-made man. As a 17 year old youth, dependent only upon himself employed in the stockyards, in a relatively short time he became the owner of a print shop, a Notary Public and an Insurance Agent, with a successful business.

    He came to America in the year 1887 from Vlatne, Cechach, (Bohemia). He worked in the stockyards and the theatre introduced him into the national life. He first took part in the play "Zibot Za Pritele" (Life For A Friend). He became acquainted with Mr. J. B. Benes, who at that time began to publish in the Town of Lake "Ozvenu" (Echo). He visited him after work and learned to set type. From then on there probably was not a simple theatrical performance in which he did not take part. Here his talents were recognized 2and his acquaintance enlarged.

    When he reached his majority he did not idle, but became a citizen and took an active interest in politics and here, also, he gained many friends.

    He opened a print shop in the "Town of Lake" at 4659 Gross Avenue, which property he bought with his brother, Karl, who learned to set type, and together they conducted a printing business. He also attempted to found a weekly and published four number of "Novomestskych Listu" (New City Paper), but means were insufficient for further publication. In spite of that, he always had it in mind.

    Vlastenec Lodge No. 142 C.S.P.S. (Czechoslovak Benefit Society) was represented by him in the Grand Lodge of Illinois and at the Detroit Convention. He was secretary of the National Grand Lodge of the Labor Society. He was also secretary of the New City Building and Loan Association.

    Merciless death again mowed down one of the young workers in the national field, and thereby took him from the arms of his beloved family at a time when, after ...

    Bohemian
    IV, II A 3 d 1, II A 2, II D 1
  • Chicago Tribune -- April 09, 1901
    Passion Play Produced by Bohemian Actors Ludwik Company Goes through Scenes of the Last Supper, Betrayal, Crucification, and Resurrection

    The "Passion Play" in Bohemian was presented by the Ludwik Theatrical Company last night at Thalia Hall, Eighteen Street and Allport Avenue. The different scenes of the passion week, the last supper, the betrayal in the garden, the trial before Pilate, the crucifixion, and finally the resurrection, were depicted with great care by the large company of Bohemian players. The part of Jesus Christ was taken by Mr. Horlivy, who was attired in a blue and white robe and wore long hair and beard as represented in the paintings by old masters. The apostle John was impersonated by Miss Splavcova, who wore the yellow hair of a Raphael angel, Judas was arrayed in yellow.

    The audience was deeply affected by many of the scenes, and there were sobs and tears at the parting of Christ from Mary Magdalene and at the crucification scene. The play will be repeated every night this week. The Ludwik Company is composed of actors from Bohemia who present a play every Sunday night at Thalia Hall.

    The "Passion Play" in Bohemian was presented by the Ludwik Theatrical Company last night at Thalia Hall, Eighteen Street and Allport Avenue. The different scenes of the passion week, the ...

    Bohemian
    II A 3 d 1, III C
  • Denní Hlasatel -- September 05, 1901
    Opening of Theatrical Season.

    Ludvik's Theatrical Society will open this season on Sept. 15th at it's headquarters in Thalia hall, corner 18th and Allport Streets. Several new artists, whom Mr. Ludvik had engaged in Bohemia, will have arrived by that time.

    Ludvik's theatrical company will endeavor further to increase the favor it has gained during the eight years of it's past existence.

    Ludvik's Theatrical Society will open this season on Sept. 15th at it's headquarters in Thalia hall, corner 18th and Allport Streets. Several new artists, whom Mr. Ludvik had engaged in ...

    Bohemian
    II A 3 d 1, IV
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 10, 1903
    Grand Banquet in Honor of Jaroslav Kocian.

    In Libuse Hall, luxuriously draped with Bohemian Colors, decorated the Bohemian Club 12th and Cypress St., held a grand banquet yesterday in honor of the distinguished guest Jaroslav Kocian, who arrived accompanied by his pianist Spindler, and their business manager Aronson. The attendance was large, and all seats at the tables, in the entire room were occupied. In addition to members of the club and their wives, almost the entire Ludvik Company and other invited guests were present. Among foreign nationalities, lawyer, W. E. Elliot, Jr., Maynard Harlan and Mrs. Murodough, were present.

    Kocian, will remain in Chicago over Sunday, and promised to visit the theatrical performance of the Ludvik Company.

    Trans. note (The Ludvik Company was a Stock Company producing plays in Bohemian).

    In Libuse Hall, luxuriously draped with Bohemian Colors, decorated the Bohemian Club 12th and Cypress St., held a grand banquet yesterday in honor of the distinguished guest Jaroslav Kocian, who ...

    Bohemian
    II B 1 c 3, II A 3 d 1, III B 2, III H