The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 22, 1901
    Bohemian Musicians Barred.

    The request of the Bohemian Musicians Union, for the admittance of their delegates to the Chicago Federation of Labor, was discussed in a meeting held last Sunday. The request was denied at the insistence of the American Federation Musicians Union, No. 10.

    The organization committee was instructed to urge the Bohemian musicians to become members of the regular musicians union.

    The request of the Bohemian Musicians Union, for the admittance of their delegates to the Chicago Federation of Labor, was discussed in a meeting held last Sunday. The request was ...

    Bohemian
    I D 2 a 2, II A 3 a, III A
  • Denní Hlasatel -- December 05, 1901
    From the Office of the Bohemian Typographical Union, #330, I. T. W. (International Typographical Union). to the Readers of Bohemian-American Newspapers.

    Friends: - The Bohemian Typographical Union, in this manner, seeks to obtain your aid in its efforts to help Bohemian-American typesetters gain a respectable and deserved wage.

    Every branch of labor is organized so as to achieve honorable compensation for its labor and every branch of labor can boast of its gains, except the typesetters, who scattered throughout Bohemian-American communities, must often work for their board, and this none too good.

    Perhaps the one exception to this haphazard compensation of Bohemian typesetters is in Chicago, as the result of organization. However, if this condition is to be retained, if it is to be improved the competition of cheap out-of-town papers, which flood Chicago with their cheaply produced product, must be removed.

    2

    Bohemian organizations, which were of such great help to the efforts of Bohemian typesetters in the past, will surely take their stand on the side of the Bohemian Typesetters' Union and, in the future, withdraw their support from those publications which are not provided with the union label.

    It depends only upon you, readers, that the typesetters of these out-of-town publications may be properly compensated for their labor. It depends upon you, in order for local typesetters to maintain and, as much as possible, improve their present standards. Work completed by capable union typesetters is pleasing to look at, and publications set up by them are pleasing to the eyes of the reader, because of their arrangement. In opposition to this, the out-of-town publications are often set up by children or by poorly paid people, and their products look accordingly.

    In supporting union publications you are aiding union publications, in supporting non-union publications you injure the former, without materially aiding the latter, for they are doomed in any event to a miserable existence and final oblivion.

    3

    Publications which are able to pay union wages are apparently more wide-spread, and, as a result of their greater circulation, more perfect.

    No friend of union labor should subscribe to the following out-of-town publications:

    Kvety Americke, (American Blossoms) Omaha, Neb.

    Pokrok Zapadu, (Progress of the West) Omaha, Neb.

    Domacnost, (Home,) Milwaukee, Wis.

    Hlas, (Voice) St. Louis, Mo.

    The above listed circulate in Chicago, mainly, and with their cheap labor injure union publications.

    4

    Let them know, that only when they have provided themselves with the union labels will you subscribe to them, and in this manner you will help a good cause.

    In so far as concerns Chicago, the chief enemy of union labor is the "Order of Bohemian Benedicts" (Rad Ceskych Benediktinv). Notwithstanding the fact that the director of its printing plant, the Rev. Valentine Kohlbeck, has told the typesetters, that the Order owns more property than any Bohemian printing business in Chicago, it still refuses to pay the typesetters wages, such as are customary in other printing plants. Many years of negotiating on the part of the union has not produced results, and it is hardly necessary to inform friends of organized labor, that the following named publications; Narod, (Nation), Katolik, (Catholic), Pritel Ditek, (Children's Friend), and Hospodarsky Listy, (Agricultural News), are issued by an association of priests, which since time immemorial has been known for its unfriendliness to all union activities.

    5

    We call the attention of the business men who advertise in the daily Narod to the fact, that this paper, after many years of activity, has a smaller circulation than any other Bohemian paper published in Chicago, and that we consider this as sufficient reason for them to withhold their advertising business from it.

    We hope, that friends of organized labor will take the above into consideration and act accordingly. The Bohemian typesetters will surely repay you in some other manner.

    For the Bohemian Typographical Union, #330, I. T. W.

    Agitation Committee.

    Friends: - The Bohemian Typographical Union, in this manner, seeks to obtain your aid in its efforts to help Bohemian-American typesetters gain a respectable and deserved wage. Every branch of ...

    Bohemian
    I D 2 a 2, III A, II A 3 a
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 04, 1911
    (No headline)

    Classes in drawing and modeling for Czech boys, have been established in the Svatopluk Czech park, upon permission of the Park Board. Two young and gifted Czechs have been procured as teachers: Mr. M. Mrazek for drawing and Mr. Joseph L. Patek for modeling. Their excellent qualifications are evident from the samples of work exhibited by the pupils in the park building, open to the public until January 8. The school affair will be closed on that date by a lecture on "History of Architecture," delivered by Mr. J. M. Mrazek. Due credit for the success of the educational enterprise is given Mr. W. Kolacek, president of the Park Board, Mr. Karel Vopicka, Mr. Kaspar, and also to Mr. Triner, Mr. Hajicek, and Mr. Novak for generous contributions to the prize fund, out of which the prizes for outstanding achievements of pupils were purchased.

    Classes in drawing and modeling for Czech boys, have been established in the Svatopluk Czech park, upon permission of the Park Board. Two young and gifted Czechs have been procured ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 f, II A 3 a, I A 1 d, III B 2
  • Denní Hlasatel -- June 17, 1911
    Fine Arts Academy Graduation Exercises

    Commencement exercises were held yesterday afternoon by the graduates of the Academy of Fine Arts on Michigan Avenue and Adams Street. Among the graduates was Miss Marie Tuma, daughter of Mr. Longin Tuma, the manager of the Bohemian National Cemetery. Prof. Wats Folwell, of the University of Minnesota, addressed the graduates. Miss Tuma completed with success in three years the course in decorative drawing. This young lady is a deaf-mute. She has learned to speak, but the deafness has not been cured. Despite her affliction, Miss Tuma is a talented young lady, and she will be a source of great joy to her parents. We wish the young lady all the success in her artistic life's journey.

    Commencement exercises were held yesterday afternoon by the graduates of the Academy of Fine Arts on Michigan Avenue and Adams Street. Among the graduates was Miss Marie Tuma, daughter of ...

    Bohemian
    II A 3 a
  • Denní Hlasatel -- April 02, 1912
    Amateur Milliners Exhibit Hats

    Tonight at 8 P. M. at the Svatopluk Cech Park Field House at May and 20th Streets, there will be an exhibit of hats made in the Park by girls who meet there twice a week from 8 to 10 P. M. in order to learn the art of making and trimming hats. The purpose of the exhibition is to show our adolescent girls how they can make profitable use of leisure hours at night by making their own finery instead of wasting time in idleness or in nickelodeons. The Park Management invites all our Bohemian mothers and their daughters to visit this exhibition. They will be agreeably surprised to see the elegant and colorful work of our maidens.

    Tonight at 8 P. M. at the Svatopluk Cech Park Field House at May and 20th Streets, there will be an exhibit of hats made in the Park by girls ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 f, II A 3 a
  • Denní Hlasatel -- October 25, 1914
    The New Building of the Sirotcinec

    [Half-tone, three column-half of a page, architects drawing of proposed orphanage]

    An exhibition of the handicraft of the inmates of one of our principal charitable institutions will be opened today. The young inmates of the orphanage--not only girls, but boys, too--have worked hard during the whole year and have made a large number of objects which are now exhibited and for sale to our public.

    The exhibition has a double purpose: To acquaint our general public, which is at the present time the only support of our institution, with the work done by the inmates of the orphanage in their spare time, and to secure financial help. The money paid for the objects on display will go to swell the very low funds of the building committee.

    2

    Since the exhibition has been arranged for the benefit of the new building it is only fitting that we should offer, in addition to a picture, some information concerning it.

    The building, which will face Crawford Avenue, will stand fifty-six feet from the street and will be entirely fireproof. Its largest dimensions will be 108 by 96 feet, and it will accomodate 160 inmates, that is eighty boys and eighty girls. The boys' and girls' quarters will be separated, and the children will meet only in the dining room. For each forty children, there will be one nurse, or four nurses for the whole building. Three or four women will be employed in the kitchen.

    The building will have two stories, an attic, and a basement. The basement floor will be two feet under the level of the ground. Both stories and the basement will be twelve feet high. There will be steam heat, electricity and gaslight.

    3

    There will be two fireproof stairways leading from Crawford Avenue and two on the east side of the building. These latter passages will be connected with a balcony and a hall leading to the old building which will be used exclusively for hospital purposes.

    The walls will be of pressed brick; the building will be covered with a tile roof.

    The price of construction is calculated not to exceed $50,000.

    [A detailed description of the building floor plans, etc., follows.]

    [Half-tone, three column-half of a page, architects drawing of proposed orphanage] An exhibition of the handicraft of the inmates of one of our principal charitable institutions will be opened today. ...

    Bohemian
    II D 4, II A 3 a
  • Denní Hlasatel -- October 26, 1914
    Inspection of the Ceska Utulna a Sirotcinec

    It has become customary for our public and charitable institutions to render an account of their activities once a year, and at this time the general public is given free access to all its parts. One of the most attractive of such inspections was held yesterday at the Ceska Utulna A Sirotcinec (Bohemian Old People's Home and Orphanage). In connection with the inspection, an exhibition of the handicraft of the inmates of the orphanage was arranged.

    The inspection of the orphanage is always attended by a large number of visitors, and so was it yesterday.....

    The program of the afternoon started with an address of welcome delivered by President V. Suchy.....There were....a number of musical selections.....which pleased the visitors.

    2

    We saw many good ladies, particularly those who bear in mind their grown-up daughters' hope chests, purchasing an embroidery here, an ornamental pillow-case there, a lamp shade, etc.--all this the work of the tiny hands of the inmates of our first charitable institution.....

    There was a room full of handwork made by the boys which, of course, was clumsier and more man-like, but many pieces showed promise....or practical sense.....

    It has become customary for our public and charitable institutions to render an account of their activities once a year, and at this time the general public is given free ...

    Bohemian
    II D 5, II D 4, II A 3 a
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 02, 1915
    Handicraft Exhibition at the Ceska Utulna a Sirotcinec

    It was Sunday, October 25, at 2 P. M. when the main entrance of the Ceska Utulna A Sirotcinec (Bohemian Old People's Home and Orphanage) was opened to a large crowd of visitors who were eager to inspect the results of ten months' work of the young inmates of the institution.

    The crowd was unexpectedly large--larger, in fact, than the premises of the exhibition could accomodate--and there were many non-Bohemians.....

    That the exhibition was a complete success may be gathered from the fact that $475.63 was taken in for the exhibits sold to admirers during the day, in addition to which $261.15 was received subsequently, making a total of $653.28. The raw material necessary for the exhibits cost $124.99, hence the net profit for the exhibition amounted to $528.29.

    2

    Otto F. Dusek, secretary of the Ceska

    Utulna A Sirotcinec.

    It was Sunday, October 25, at 2 P. M. when the main entrance of the Ceska Utulna A Sirotcinec (Bohemian Old People's Home and Orphanage) was opened to a large ...

    Bohemian
    II A 3 a, II D 5, II D 4
  • Denní Hlasatel -- May 25, 1917
    The Work of a Czech Artist

    The Gould Printing Company has placed on the market a beautiful color-print, "United States of America," which shows the Capitol in Washington, the Statue of Liberty, and a likeness of President Wilson. The text of the President's message of April 2 to Congress is printed on the back of the sheet.

    The picture is the work of the gifted Czech painter, J. J. Klapka, son of Mr. Alois Klapka, popular member of the Chicago theatrical troupe, Ludvik. Mr. J. J. Klapka is secretary of the Association of Commercial Artists.

    The Gould Printing Company has placed on the market a beautiful color-print, "United States of America," which shows the Capitol in Washington, the Statue of Liberty, and a likeness of ...

    Bohemian
    II A 3 a, IV
  • Denní Hlasatel -- July 14, 1917
    Czech Artist Honored by the Governor (Summary)

    The Chicago Tribune reported in yesterday's issue on the appointment by Governor Frank Lowden of Prof. Albin Polášek as a member of the State Art Conservation Council. It is surprising that not one Czech language newspaper of Chicago took notice in its columns of this item. The Denní Hlasatel was unable to print the news as it learned about it after its deadline.

    Albin Polášek was born in Frenštát in Moravia. He showed signs of artistic inclinations at an early age, devoting himself to wood carving, and later to the creation of ornamental work.

    He came to the United States in 1901, landing in New York, from there he moved to Minnesota, and later to La Crosse, Wisconsin. In this town he 2specialized in carving wood statues for churches. He was a wood carver up to that time. Not until 1905 did he begin to study the art of sculpturing. This he did in Philadelphia, and after one year of study, he was awarded a first prize. He held the Cressen Traveling Scholarship from 1907 to 1909, which enabled him to visit the main art centers of Europe.

    In 1910, while working in Rome, Italy, he was awarded the "Prize of Rome," the highest distinction within the reach of students of the Academy of Art in Rome. It carried with it not only a yearly stipend of $1,000, but free lodging, light, heat, and free tuition. Polášek enjoyed these extraordinary privileges for fully three years. He returned to America in 1913 to settle in New York, where he established himself at 9 McDougal Alley. After a brief sojourn in Baltimore, Maryland, he received and accepted a call from Chicago to become a professor and director of the Department of Sculpture at the Art Institute. In this capacity he still functions. His predecessor was the well-known artist, Mulligan.

    3

    Honors galore were showered upon Polášek; among them: at the Paris Exposition, the San Francisco World's Fair, and at other occasions. He is a member of the Metropolitan Museum of New York, the Academy of Arts of Philadelphia, of the Society of Sculptors, and the Architects' League of New York. He opened his studio in Chicago at 6114 Stony Island Avenue.

    He enjoys great popularity among his students, not only for his great artistic achievements, but for his quiet, unassuming ways as well. He is a sincere son of the Czech people, representing himself as a Czech on every occasion. In a recent interview, granted to a representative of this paper, he declared himself to have been an enthusiastic member of the Sokol associations.

    [Translator's Note:- At present, Polášek's studio is located adjacent to the Medinah Temple. The statue of "Music" and the desk, representing musicians of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, are his work. They are placed in front of the Art Institute.]

    The Chicago Tribune reported in yesterday's issue on the appointment by Governor Frank Lowden of Prof. Albin Polášek as a member of the State Art Conservation Council. It is surprising ...

    Bohemian
    II A 3 a, II A 3 c, I F 5, IV