The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 25, 1892
    The Bohemians in Chicago

    The Bohemians constitute a larger percentage of the population than is generally estimated... The first Bohemian immigrants arrived in Chicago in 1853. Several families undertook the long journey from New York to Chicago. Then erected log-houses upon the prairie which is now the North Side, and soon many of their countrymen followed their example. Among the first immigrants were Mathias Barcal, the father of Police-lieutenant Barcal, and J. Padeckcy...He is the founder of the Bohemian Athletic Clubs. Dr. Valenta was the first Bohemian physician and J. Fischer the first one to open a store.

    In 1860 the Bohemian colony in Chicago consisted of approximately 1,000 members. The first thing they organized was a rifle club. The sharpshooters participated in the war (Civil War) and were recognized as courageous fighters, particular in the battles at Mission-Ridge, Tunnel 2Hill, Bussetrost, etc. The commander of the Bohemian battalion, Major Michalozcy, was killed in the last mentioned battle.

    Considerable difficulties were experienced in getting a Bohemian newspaper established on a self-paying basis. Finally in 1870 the Nova Doba (New Era) seemed to be successful, but the Chicago Fire destroyed the undertaking.

    The Svornost (Unity) was organized in 1874 and became the leading newspaper among the Bohemians in the course of time. Besides the above paper two others, the Chicagske Listy, and the Denni Hlasatel, have now a large number of readers. There is also a large Bohemian library in Chicago.

    The scattered Bohemian colonies united in due time and settled in the territory between Canal, Ewing, Forquer, Taylor, and De Koven streets, 3where they build two gymnasiums, and a theater. The district located west of Halsted, and south of 16th street is now an exclusive Bohemian colony. Not less than 15,000 Bohemians own real-estate property there, and some of the buildings have a value of about $50,000.

    Other Bohemian colonies are located west of Ashland avenue, west of Douglas Park, and at Humboldt Park. Some of the schools in these territories are attended almost exclusively by Bohemian children. Likewise do we find Bohemian settlements in Town Lake, and on South Halsted street.

    There are not less than 300 Bohemian clubs in Chicago, and their social activities have reached the climax. The total Bohemian population is estimated at 60,000. The first representative of the Bohemians at the School Board was A. Kraus; his successor, Dr. Jirka, is also a Bohemian. L. W. Kadlec represented the Bohemians as an official of the Public 4Library, and his successor, W. Kaspar, became a financier. J. Kravolec is a member of the West Park Board.

    The Bohemians are represented at the present by the Republican Chott in the Congress of the State, by the Alderman, F. Dvorak in the City Council, and by Stepina at the County Board.

    They also possess a Bohemian brewery valued at $300,000 and a Bohemian cemetery in Irving Park which is valued at $200,000. They have erected a beautiful monument upon this cemetery in honor of their countrymen who lost their lives in the Civil War.

    The Bohemians constitute a larger percentage of the population than is generally estimated... The first Bohemian immigrants arrived in Chicago in 1853. Several families undertook the long journey from New ...

    Bohemian
    III A, II B 2 d 1, I A 1 a, II A 1, II A 2, II B 3, I F 4, III D, II C, I G
  • Svornost -- January 17, 1896
    Big Loss in Carl Jonas' Death

    The Bohemian community in the U.S. has suffered a great and unredeemable loss in its national and political life.

    With the death of Carl Jonas, the Bohemian-American community lost its first tutor and protector, its national idealist, and instructor. Since 1863, when he was 23 years of age, he had offered all his energy, ability, and life to the cause of awakening and exciting the Bohemian-American people to honest workmanship and education.

    Overworked, he lost the fight with life as the American consul in Crefeld, where he represented his American countrymen.

    Carl Jonas was known and honored by every Bohemian in America during the last 33 years because he was always active as reporter, editor, and manager of the publications Slavie, Zwon, Prorok and American.

    2

    His main works are a Bohemian-English vocabulary, "A Woman in a Human Community," "Austro-American Pacts and Conventions," "American Law" (3 editions), "Bohemian Interpretations for Americans.

    He also studied law, political science, and economy. He created the Bohemian colony in Kaledonia, near Racine, Wis.

    A republican until 1872, he was entirely absorbed with the creation of his big Bohemian colony in Kaledonia.

    Beloved, eloquent, his advice was always appreciated and approved even by the old settlers in his new colony.

    In 1872, Carl Jonas became a democrat, taking part in the state's democratic events and gaining prominence and influence among older politicans.

    Nobody could state that he was a professional politician acting for his own 3profit,--honestly or dishonestly. He never soiled his honor for political reasons and kept all promises to friends and political opponents.

    Married to Christine Kozicka, daughter of a Racine farmer, he left 4 children, all married and in the United States.

    A freethinker from his youngest years, he never believed in the dominating power of priesthood or nomility over the population. The activity of his whole life was concentrated in that direction. The memory of Carl Jonas should never be forgotten.

    He was buried in Prague, Bohemia.

    The Bohemian community in the U.S. has suffered a great and unredeemable loss in its national and political life. With the death of Carl Jonas, the Bohemian-American community lost its ...

    Bohemian
    IV, II B 2 d 1, II B 2 d 3, II A 1
  • Svornost -- April 01, 1900
    The Memoirs of the Bohemian Doctor.

    The other day there was issued by the printinghouse of August Geringer a very valuable publication, which certainly will surprise the Bohemian public.

    The publication describes the history of the city of Chicago and its suburbs, and so long as it describes the Bohemian lifeit is, undoubtedly, a wonderful contribution to the history of American Bohemians in Chicago.

    This publication entitled "The Memoirs of the Bohemian Doctor," discusses the history of the Bohemians in America, generally, and in Chicago, particularly and is written by the oldest Bohemian physician in Chicago, Dr. Jan Habenicht. A beautiful preface adorns the first pages of this book. The annals of the Bohemian life in Chicago are the most important part of the book and you will find there a complete description of the private, public, and social life of the Bohemians, and it will be really a truly cherished remembrance for everybody; so much the more as the details are described correctly, completely and impartially.

    2

    The price of this book is 25 cents, which makes it accessible to everybody. It is even possible for the poor people to buy this book for their household. There are innumerable perfect and original illustrations. Generally speaking, the book, "Memoirs of the Bohemian Doctor," is very meritorious and worthy to be acquired by every Bohemian, because it is a chronicle of our life on the soil of our new fatherland.

    The other day there was issued by the printinghouse of August Geringer a very valuable publication, which certainly will surprise the Bohemian public. The publication describes the history of the ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 d 3, II A 1
  • Svornost -- April 28, 1900
    Bohemian Druggists-Pharmacists

    The Chicago Pharmaceutical College celebrated, yesterday, in the Grand Opara House, its graduation day. Among the graduates were four Bohemians from Chicago: Joseph Lestina, Rudolph Boem, Alvernon Varhanik and Anthony Kucera. Last week, after the State examination, two countrymen, Lestina and F. Pokorny received their State licenses.

    The Chicago Pharmaceutical College celebrated, yesterday, in the Grand Opara House, its graduation day. Among the graduates were four Bohemians from Chicago: Joseph Lestina, Rudolph Boem, Alvernon Varhanik and Anthony ...

    Bohemian
    II A 1
  • Denní Hlasatel -- March 05, 1901
    Lectures at the Society of Bohemian Journalists.

    At the last meeting of the "Society of Bohemian Journalists," it was decided that at the regular meetings, hereafter, some one of the members is to arrange a lecture. The first such lecture will take place at the next meeting to be held this coming Saturday in the club room on the second floor of the Schlitz Building, corner of 19th street and Blue Island avenue, and it is certain that all members will attend. The society's room is furnished with various comforts; there is a selection of American newspapers and there will be arriving soon the leading papers of Bohemia. The "Society of Bohemian Journalists" is zealously working toward an excellent goal and will surely become a good example in Bohemian-American public life.

    At the last meeting of the "Society of Bohemian Journalists," it was decided that at the regular meetings, hereafter, some one of the members is to arrange a lecture. The ...

    Bohemian
    II A 1, II B 2 g
  • Denní Hlasatel -- May 12, 1901
    The Organization Question.

    When the working men of some trades organize themselves into a union, when those belonging to some branch of business or industry compose themselves into an association it is generally recognized as reasonable and beneficial.

    But in no way can our countrymen become reconciled to the idea, that Bohemian-American newspapermen should also organize in their own interests. When even a few editors or reporters in the employ of competitive papers meet in a public place, and talk together in a proper and friendly manner, everyone who witnesses it takes notice as though something improper were being done, and as though it was to be understood, that the employees of various publications must argue and fight among themselves.

    This is a sad phenomenon. The "Society of Bohemian Journalists of America" has taken as its aim: The rectification of this misunderstanding, the formation of an "editors and reporters" organization, the gaining for the newspaper business of public respect and the proper esteem of the employers.

    2

    But, the work of the society is being destroyed by the indifference of the newspapermen themselves, and by the pre-judgement of a large following of citizens. Only the editors of Hlasatel and Narod, and of several weekly papers belong to the "society of journalists." The most peculiar thing about it is that people, who call themselves the most enlightened, who preach the organization of various workingmen, disregard the organization of their own particular following. Rural editors apparently have an altogether indifferent attitude, as not one of them has recognized the joining of the society as a good thing.

    When we see the indifference, yes, the dislike, which a great number of newspapermen show toward their own organization it seems to us that it is indeed a truthful saying, "that every man on earth prospers according to his merit," newspapermen also.

    When the working men of some trades organize themselves into a union, when those belonging to some branch of business or industry compose themselves into an association it is generally ...

    Bohemian
    I D 2 a 2, II A 1, III A
  • Denní Hlasatel -- May 25, 1901
    New Bohemian Lawyers.

    Two Bohemians have completed the study of law at the Illinois College of Law. They are James O. Hruby and James F. Stepina, Commencement exercises were held, last night, at Handel Hall where diplomas were awarded to the graduates.

    Two Bohemians have completed the study of law at the Illinois College of Law. They are James O. Hruby and James F. Stepina, Commencement exercises were held, last night, at ...

    Bohemian
    II A 1, IV
  • Denní Hlasatel -- September 22, 1901
    Recognition of a Bohemian.

    Dr. Josef F. Lunak, 658 Loomis St., Appointed Professor of Practical Dentistry.

    It is with pleasure that everyone receives the report that one of our countrymen has been honered by being called to act as a Professor of Dentistry at Northwestern University.

    Dr. Josef F. Lunak was appointed Professor of Dentistry at a meeting of the Directors of Northwestern University Dental School last week. He will take up his duties immediately as the study of dentistry commenced at the University this week. The appointment is extraordinary, for the reason that Dr. Lunak did not seek it. It was offered to him by the Directors.

    Dr. Lunak was a distinguished student at this institution, and it was, therefore, for his earnest industry that he was given the greatest recognition possible that the University could bestow on one of its students, which is to be appointed valedictorian of his class. This unusual recognition of the youthful Bohemian is now further advanced by his appointment to the faculty.

    2

    Dr. Josef F. Lunak was born in Cleveland in 1878, and his appointment is all the more extraordinary because of his youth. Even in the first year of his studies at the University, attention was directed towards him, and he was soon recognized as the leader of his class, which class elected him to membership in the fraternal society, Psi Omega.

    So far as we know, he is the first Bohemian in Chicago to be so honored. The news of his elevation will be welcomed by all his friends.

    Dr. Josef F. Lunak, 658 Loomis St., Appointed Professor of Practical Dentistry. It is with pleasure that everyone receives the report that one of our countrymen has been honered by ...

    Bohemian
    IV, I A 1 a, II A 1
  • Denní Hlasatel -- April 17, 1902
    Labor Matters. from Bohemian-American Society of Journalists.

    At their own request, the Bohemian-American Society of Journalists was inducted into the International Typographical Union of North America, and given number four (4). It was officially named "Chicago Bohemian-American Newspaper Writer's Union No. 4, International Typographical Union of North America." It became a regular affiliate, using the same union label as all other Bohemian union print-shops and newspapers. Of these, only those will be considered union-shops, which employ not only union typesetters and other labor, but union editors as well. The agreement, in which are formulated the demands of the members of the Bohemian-American Journalist Societies, has again been placed before the publishers of Bohemian newspapers for signature; they have not accepted as yet, but it is expected that they all will sign readily. The Union of Bohemian Journalists does not want to cause the owners of Bohemian papers unnecessary difficulties and will strive to maintain present friendly relations. However, it will insist upon the fulfillment of its reasonable demands. Thus far a mutual agreement with our Society has been signed by the publishers of the following papers:

    2

    Denni Hlasatel, Spravedlnost, and Zenskychlisty, effective since the first of the year, and Lidovych Novin, effective since April 15.

    The other Bohemian papers are to accept or reject the agreement by Saturday, April 19. In case of rejection by papers using the union label, the local representative of the International Typographical Union will intercede.

    At their own request, the Bohemian-American Society of Journalists was inducted into the International Typographical Union of North America, and given number four (4). It was officially named "Chicago Bohemian-American ...

    Bohemian
    I D 2 a 2, II B 2 d 1, II A 1
  • Denní Hlasatel -- April 12, 1903
    Traveling to Bohemia.

    Mr. T. V. Vilim of 1620 West 22nd St. the well known pharmacist and graduate optician, who operates a first class drug-store, an Eye and Ear clinic, perfectly equiped with Roentgen Ray machines, is leaving with his wife on the 23rd of April for the old country, so as to attend the Eye and Ear clinic in Prague, for further studies. On his return to America he will again endeavor to serve our countrymen to the best of his ability in the cure of Eye and Ear troubles. After he completes the studies at Prague he expects to travel through Italy and will stop in Paris for a time, where he wishes to become acquainted with the French methods of treating the Eyes and Ears. During his absence the entire business will be conducted by an experienced pharmacist Mr. Ant. J. Jehlik with the assistance of Mr. J. Vlck and N. Stach.

    Mr. Jehlik will also conduct the Eye and Ear Clinic under the supervision of professor Reigl and Dr. J. Vasumpaur experienced ouclists and aurists. Any of our countrymen who would like to obtain medicines or curative herbs from Bohemia, which cannot be obtained here, should let Mr. Vilim know before his departure and he will gladly take care of such transactions.

    Mr. T. V. Vilim of 1620 West 22nd St. the well known pharmacist and graduate optician, who operates a first class drug-store, an Eye and Ear clinic, perfectly equiped with ...

    Bohemian
    II D 3, II A 1, III H, IV