The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Chicago Tribune -- May 09, 1876
    Yesterday's Proletarian Riot.

    The Bohemian and Polish laborers in the lumberyards in the southwest quarter of the city who were called on by the proprietors to accept $1.25 per day instead of $1.50 on account of the great depression in business, struck, and refused to work at the rate, as they had a right to do, But there were plenty of Germans, and Irish, and Americans destitute of employment who were glad to take the vacant places. But this enraged the strikers, who demanded $1.75 per day, and, under the influence of Communist demagogues, resolved that the other workmen should not be employed, but that they must be taken back at advanced wages, and they proceeded to mob both the workmen and the employers. A large proportion of these Bohemians had been idle during the winter months, as the bulk of the work consists of unloading vessels, sorting and piling lumber.

    2

    Their refusal to work, under these circumstances, and in the present hard times, was a folly which only ignorant men would commit, since, including their families, some 2,000 or 3,000 people are dependent on their employment at this season of the year. But since they have resorted to violence and an attempted interference with the right of other men to labor at any price they choose to accept, it is no longer a question of the policy of the strikers, but simply an emergency requiring the strong arms of authority to suppress quickly and summarily the mob-violence incited against it. There is at present truce between the strikers and the employers, but it has been obtained by a practical abandonment of work, and the terrorism which the strikers sought to establish virtually exists. The moral force of this must be broken, and the right of free men to free labor established beyond the reach of menace.

    The Bohemian and Polish laborers in the lumberyards in the southwest quarter of the city who were called on by the proprietors to accept $1.25 per day instead of $1.50 ...

    Bohemian
    I D 2 a 4, I D 2 a 4
  • Chicago Tribune -- August 09, 1877
    Bohemians.

    A second meeting of the Bohemians was held last evening at the Bohemian Hall. The meeting was quite large and composed of better material than such gatherings usually are. The object of the meeting seemed to be to calmly discuss the result of the late riots and to better unite the lumber-shovers, and give some expression in defense of the Bohemian nationality from the aspersions cast upon them in the late troubles. Numerous speeches were made accusing the papers of blamming them for the riots and censuring them as a class, which charges the speakers resented with great earnestness. They maintained that the Bohemians are peacable, law-abiding citizens, and that of the 25,000 in the city a smaller portion had been convicted of crime than any other class. Resolutions were adopted denouncing the papers for accusing them of leading and promoting the riots of two weeks ago. The meeting was devoid of enthusiasm, but from remarks not incendiary -occasionally dropped by a hot-headed speaker, it was evident, that the leaders of that nationality, at least, were ready to resent imaginary evils of any kind at any time, and to join the lumber-shovers or any other class, in a strike, let the consequences be what they may. The following resolution then was adopted.

    2

    "Resolved, that we protest against those calumnies thrown upon us Bohemians in Chicago during the past riotous days by our large dailies, the Tribune and the Times. We refer every fellow-citizen to the criminal statistics of the city of Chicago, which show that the Bohemian Nationality being represented here by at least 25,000 inhabitants, furnish proportionality the least contingent of criminals and transgressors to the prisons and jails. And by these statistics we prove that those calumnies were base affronts to all the best citizens of Bohemian extraction, and we pronounce them a base lie.

    A second meeting of the Bohemians was held last evening at the Bohemian Hall. The meeting was quite large and composed of better material than such gatherings usually are. The ...

    Bohemian
    I D 2 a 4, I C
  • Chicago Tribune -- August 12, 1877
    The Lumber-Shovers' Proposed Strike.

    If the lumber-shovers of Chicago carry out the threats they have previously made, they will strike to-morrow morning for higher wages and undertake to forcibly prevent others from taking their places, with the expectation of coercing their employees to accede to their demands. There are said to be 4,500 lumber-shovers in this city, mostly Bohemians, who were originally mostly all agricultural laborers, and who have abandoned their farm-work in the old country to undertake the harder work of lumber-shoving in Chicago. It may not be that all of them will strike; but the principles at issue are the same, whether 100 strike or the whole 4,500.

    There are two sides to this question, as to every other. There is no doubt that the labor of these men is very hard and toilsome. There is no doubt that their wages are low. Up to last year, they, had we believe, $1.50 per day.

    2

    In the present depressed condition of the lumber-market they receive but $1.25. They ought to get more, if possible, upon the principle that the laborer is worthy of his hire; but, if the business affords no more, and the market will furnish men who are willing to work at the current wages, then these striking Bohemians have no right to prevent them. They have the right to quit work. They have the right to ask what they please and to refuse to work until they get it; but they have no right to forcibly prevent other men from working $1.25, because they want an increase to $1.50. The settlement of this question, therefore depends on the ability of the lumber firms to obtain substitutes. If the market will not furnish men who are willing to work for the prevent wages, then the strikers will succeed in getting their advance. So far as the mere fact of striking is concerned, there is nothing censurable in their announcement. But, when they couple with it the distinct threat that they will not allow any other men to take their places, they not only transcent their rights in the premises, but, if they carry their threat into operation, immediately becomes liable to arrest and punishment under the State law of Illinois, passed last winter, affixing penalties for obstructing business.

    3

    The provisions of this law are so explicit, that the lumber-shovers will have no difficulty in ascertaining its meaning. And it may be added that the businessmen of this city, after the disastrous experiences of the past 2 or 3 weeks, are not in a temper to allow interferences with their business, nor are the authorities in a temper to allow any violent proceedings upon the part of a mob to stop labor. As long as those proposed strikers refrain from interference with business, no one will interfere with them. But the moment they commence to hinder others by force from working, they violate the law and will be persecuted accordingly.

    If the lumber-shovers of Chicago carry out the threats they have previously made, they will strike to-morrow morning for higher wages and undertake to forcibly prevent others from taking their ...

    Bohemian
    I D 2 a 4
  • Svornost -- June 25, 1878
    Local News

    The strike at Cooper's was ended after nine days. Hereafter, they are to receive 40 cents instead of 25 cents for making lard barrels.

    It would be well for all Bohemian coopers to join the union.

    The strike at Cooper's was ended after nine days. Hereafter, they are to receive 40 cents instead of 25 cents for making lard barrels. It would be well for all ...

    Bohemian
    I D 2 a 3, I D 2 a 4, III A
  • Svornost -- July 18, 1892
    National Hall Meeting

    Bohemian Workers in protest against "Pinkertons' Bohemian Workers Educational Club" called a mass meeting yesterday afternoon, in "National Hall", for the purpose of protesting the use of "Pinkerton Murderers" against the workingman of Homestead, Pa., and at the same time to offer their warmest sympathies for the locked out steel mill workers of Pennsylvania.

    Is it justice, when a capitalist is allowed to defend his supposed interests with the aid of a gun, while a worker is denied the right to even raise his voice in protest, lest he be labeled an anarchist, or villain, of the biggest sort? Is that any kind of freedom, when every rich cut-throat can have us shot whenever he takes a notion to do so?

    Resolved, that we Bohemian Workingmen gathered here in National Hall in Chicago, protest in the name of all Bohemian Workers of Chicago against the legality of the hiring of murderers by the capitalist, for use against their workingmen, whenever they see fit. Further, we protest 2against the support of the capitalist by the Government of Pennsylvania. The laboring men there are being oppressed and driven to deeds of desperation in order that the workers may be accused of all unrest. Finally, it is resolved to express our full sympathy with the strikers, and to encourage further opposition against the superior force of capitalist, who are making every effort to destroy all trade unions and to secure the ruling power.

    We condemn all such forms of procedure, and call on all organized labor in America to raise its voice in behalf of the oppressed workers of Homestead, Pa.

    This resolution was unanimously adopted and the meeting was then adjourned.

    Bohemian Workers in protest against "Pinkertons' Bohemian Workers Educational Club" called a mass meeting yesterday afternoon, in "National Hall", for the purpose of protesting the use of "Pinkerton Murderers" against ...

    Bohemian
    I D 2 a 4, I D 2 a 1, I D 1 a
  • Svornost -- March 19, 1896
    Laborer Question Bohemian Workers and the Foreign Press

    Many times we have had the opportunity to call the attention of our countrymen to the manner in which the local foreign press, especially German and English, are using the smallest facts to lower the Bohemian immigrant element to a basis below that of the Polish or Russian Jew. Our Bohemian immigrants were depicted as enemies of the American regime, ignorant, anarchistically inclined and trying to overthrow the regular government.

    We should be thankful for this kind of inspiration to the individuals who collected money among the American population for educational purposes for the local Bohemians. It is impossible to refute such calumnies with two or three columns of writing about some prominent Bohemian citizen or about some national undertaking which is published in the American news by the country of this or that other person.

    2

    The German journals and especially those which reflect the local voice of the people, as for instance, the Abendpost and others, are helping to spread among foreigners the false impression that the Bohemian working masses are very low in every way. At the outbreak of the tailors strike, one of the local German newspapers lamented the Bohemian tailor trade and added to it that Bohemia is one of the nations that brought poverty to this country. Everybody knows how our intelligent tailors tried to keep on the level, to organize the workingmen in the tailor business and to agitate for improvement of the trade.

    In yesterday's copy of the Record for instance, there appeared a news story entitled, "Bohemians are Fighting With Bohemians. A Few Shots Were Fired And The Fighting Was So Violent That Police From Three Stations Were Called." The local press spreads this kind of information with pleasure. Among American readers, we have collected the details on the above item in the Record. There was a little first fight between two Bohemians. We hope our readers, friends of the Bohemian population, will pay no attention to this kind of wrong information 3The local Bohemian workingmen know very well that the Bohemian community and press sympathize with them. They will carefully watch themselves so that nothing may happen, which would give the English newspapers a chance to write stories again, dishonoring our honest workingmen. Endurance, self-esteem, general moderation and reputation will elevate the Bohemian workers and place them on the high level with others.

    Many times we have had the opportunity to call the attention of our countrymen to the manner in which the local foreign press, especially German and English, are using the ...

    Bohemian
    I C, I D 2 a 4, II B 2 d 1, II B 2 d 1
  • Denní Hlasatel -- March 16, 1901
    Bohemian Typographers Strike

    The printing plant of Narod is closed today, because the Benedictines did not sign an agreement with the Bohemian Typographical Union. At yesterday's meeting of this union, the strike was called. Narod thus far has not been a union shop, though its typesetters have become members of the union.

    The strikers ask the support of the public.

    The printing plant of Narod is closed today, because the Benedictines did not sign an agreement with the Bohemian Typographical Union. At yesterday's meeting of this union, the strike was ...

    Bohemian
    I D 2 a 4, I D 2 a 2, III C
  • Denní Hlasatel -- March 22, 1901
    Typesetters' Union Makes New Demands

    Some of our Typesetters have disregarded the agreement of a week ago, and now come forward with a new demand.

    We are particularly blessed by people who like to share. Eight years ago members of a literary society, requested that we turn our business over to them. We served these impudent applicants according to their merits. Now it seems this is all to be repeated.

    Although it is only a week since we signed an agreement with the Typographical Union, in which we agreed to terms such as even the Typesetters of the large English papers can not boast of; although we put into force the various articles of the agreement some of our typesetters prepared a surprise for us yesterday. They stopped work at noon and in the afternoon delivered their ultimatum, which says: "Give each of us, one like the other, a share in the business as large as each of you have. If you do not divide with us before 4 o'clock this afternoon, we will step out of the job."

    If the workers in an English business, or of any nationality came with a like request, they would simply be laughed at, and called crazy. But with us anything is possible. What would Geringer say if his typesetters suddenly arose and said: "Make us share holders in your business or we will not work!" But the workers of Geringer would 2not think of such an idea. In the first place, "Jesus" is a rich capitalist and no one dare oppose people of that class, but everyone has courage against a fellow-worker, or a firm which is financially weak. In the second place Geringer in his business has ruled and still rules with an iron hand. The workers in his plant are like so much machinery, whereas, with us the share-holder in the business works along side another worker; respects him as a fellow worker and allows him all the rights and privileges which he himself enjoys. For that, our typesetters repay us by coming forward with a proposition that they share in the business. To be sure, we know very well from which direction the wind blows.

    More than two months ago a deputation of our typesetters visited Mr. Albieri to offer him the Editorship. Because they were not shareholders with us, and the other papers evidently had not made them their agents, it is plainly to be seen that some of our typographers at that time were already working towards the founding of a new paper. In this work and preparation they progressed steadily, with the expectation that, Denni Hlasatel, and Svornost, would not sign an agreement with the Union as the conditions of the agreement were carried to extremes. In this event they wanted to come out with a new newspaper, raise a hue and cry and create a whirlwind of dust and publicity for themselves. They miscalculated. Bohemian newspapers, with the exception of Narod, signed the agreement and in that manner took the trumps away from our ambitious typesetters. The various articles of agreement 3were strictly adhered to by Denni Hlasatel and there remained nothing else for our dear typesetters to do except cast aside the Union mask behind which they hid, repudiate the agreement, make new demands which were impossible of fulfillment, and then quit work to found a newspaper for themselves.

    The ultimatum handed to us was signed by people, who had been employed by us for only a few months. It contained the name of a former shareholder who again wished to become a shareholder in our business; but who when, Denni Hlasatel was in its most difficult period had himself paid out and went to work for a rival paper. There are names on this ultimatum of persons with whom, should we associate would ruin our business, for which we struggled so fiercely, and on which we have worked for the past ten years.

    We are and will remain union. If the union lives up to its agreements and laws it will never have occasion for any action against us. We will not discharge any of our enterprising typesetters, and if any one of them wishes to return to work under union conditions he has an open road. But we will not divide with anyone. Even a beggar defends his bag with all his might if someone wants to take it.

    Our paper is union. All work on it is done by union labor. The entire present affair results from the fact that nine typesetters quit work without giving notice, handing us the previously mentioned ultimatum to the amusement of ourselves and the 4entire public, hoping, by that means to cover their decision to enter upon the publication of a new newspaper.

    When they have passed through the experiences and struggles, such as we have had to contend with, then let some one approach them with a demand such as they have made of us.

    They will give it to them!

    Some of our Typesetters have disregarded the agreement of a week ago, and now come forward with a new demand. We are particularly blessed by people who like to share. ...

    Bohemian
    I D 2 a 2, I D 2 a 4, III A
  • Denní Hlasatel -- April 03, 1901
    Strike at Svornost.

    That friend of labor, darling and patron of Bohemian Socialist Democrats, Mr. August Geringer, has been shown in his true colors. With deceptive pretense he acquired the union label, thought he had no intention to abide by union conditions and never did abide by them - but he could permit him-self anything. Finally, however, his time has come. The officers of the Bohemian Typographical Union, together with representatives of the Allied Printing Trades Council, investigated conditions in the printing plant of Svomost and were convinced that union wages were not paid nor were union hours observed there, for that reason a strike has been called in that establishment and the union label taken away.

    Svornost appeared without the union label yesterday.

    The hypocrisy of "Geringer" is astonishing. When several of our typesetters quit working, because their unreasonable demands, to be made shareholders in the business, as those are, who started the business and with great sacrifices worked through from bitter beginnings, were not granted, Svornost wrote maliciously that there is a strike in our plant.

    2

    The day before yesterday a strike was declared against Svornost in accordance with union rules and the union label was removed.

    "Geringer" is as silent as the grave about this, for he wants to keep the public in the mistaken belief that his plant is a unionshop.

    Whoever still believed there was a little sincerity in that old fox, probably will have his eyes opened now.

    That friend of labor, darling and patron of Bohemian Socialist Democrats, Mr. August Geringer, has been shown in his true colors. With deceptive pretense he acquired the union label, thought ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 d 1, I D 2 a 4, I D 2 a 2, III A, IV
  • Denní Hlasatel -- October 03, 1902
    Striking Coal Miners Supported by Bohemian Labor.

    p.4- Bohemian workingmen will do their duty. Welfare activity on behalf of the striking coal-miners has been started in the larger communities, and it is expected that it will have the support of the majority of our public.

    Bohemian California, in this respect, is progressing far ahead of all other Bohemian communities. Bohemian women of Bohemian, California are arranging a ball for Saturday evening, Oct. 11th, from which the net proceeds will be donated to the needy coal-miners.

    On Sunday, following this affair there will be held a grand party by union workingmen for the same purpose. We feel certain that both of these undertakings will meet with great success. Bohemians, without exception, sympathize with the lockedout coal-miners and, with all their heart, wish for them a victory over the pot-bellied capitalists. In order to help the coal-miners to gain their victory Bohemians will contribute their dollars.

    The Bohemian-California community is so large and so well informed, that both entertainments will be able to boast a large attendance.

    p.4- Bohemian workingmen will do their duty. Welfare activity on behalf of the striking coal-miners has been started in the larger communities, and it is expected that it will have ...

    Bohemian
    II D 10, I D 2 a 4, I D 1 a