The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Svornost -- June 25, 1878
    Local News

    The strike at Cooper's was ended after nine days. Hereafter, they are to receive 40 cents instead of 25 cents for making lard barrels.

    It would be well for all Bohemian coopers to join the union.

    The strike at Cooper's was ended after nine days. Hereafter, they are to receive 40 cents instead of 25 cents for making lard barrels. It would be well for all ...

    Bohemian
    I D 2 a 3, I D 2 a 4, III A
  • Svornost -- May 10, 1881
    A Proclamation to All Bohemian Owners of Bakery Shops

    Bohemian bakery shop employees, at a meeting held Saturday afternoon, in the Hall of "Tel. Jed. Sokol" (Gymnastic Union Sokol), for the purpose of deciding the best method to secure the betterment of working conditions, accepted the following resolutions unanimously:

    (1) Publicly by means of the newspapers to notify all proprietors of bakery shops to install a twelve hour day and give a wage increase of ten per cent.

    (2) For every hour of work performed after 12 o'clock midnight, the worker is to be paid fifteen cents.

    (3) Those employees who are boarded by the employer, are to enjoy such food and quarters as are befitting a working man.

    (4) All those who work without board and room are to receive three dollars more weekly pay.

    (5) All proprietors of bakery shops are called upon to decide these points before Saturday, May 14 and announce their decisions to the Chairman of the Bohemian Bakers Union under the address of Hynek Kopp, 161 Bunker St.

    Bohemian bakery shop employees, at a meeting held Saturday afternoon, in the Hall of "Tel. Jed. Sokol" (Gymnastic Union Sokol), for the purpose of deciding the best method to secure ...

    Bohemian
    I D 2 a 3, I D 1 b, III A
  • Svornost -- April 10, 1896
    [Co-Operative Taloring Factory Founded]

    The Bohemian Tailor's Union, #102, has founded a cooperative tailoring factory at 742 Van Horn Street. The business administration of the factory was entrusted to Mr. Joseph Stybe, who will be manager and provide jobs at first to the tailors who have families.

    The Bohemian Tailor's Union, #102, has founded a cooperative tailoring factory at 742 Van Horn Street. The business administration of the factory was entrusted to Mr. Joseph Stybe, who will ...

    Bohemian
    I D 2 b, I D 2 a 3
  • Denní Hlasatel -- April 30, 1904
    Local Bohemian Lumber Workers Talk Union

    A desire is being aroused among Bohemian workingmen in the local number industry for the organization of a union. This is really a desirable step, for these people are in many instances oppressed, and know not what to do with their divided forces. If they unite and create an integral body, they will be given consideration and they could then set up their demands. The realization of their objectives be accomplished through their allied efforts.

    However, if such an organization is to have a good foundation, it must originate with workers, must spring from their own desire to form a cohesive body among themselves.

    Unions based upon forced membership, do not have solidarity and they fall apart at the slightest tremor. Therefore, those who are interested in seeing a solid organization established should talk it over frequently with their fellow-workers and spread the idea from one factory to another. When sufficient interest in this direction is evidenced, a public meeting can be called and the final work of organizing accomplished. We hope that our workingmen will soon achieve their aims and appear before us as a powerful organization in welfare activities.

    A desire is being aroused among Bohemian workingmen in the local number industry for the organization of a union. This is really a desirable step, for these people are in ...

    Bohemian
    I D 2 a 3, I D 2 a 2
  • Denní Hlasatel -- February 05, 1911
    Labor Matters

    The Reply of Mr. A. Uzlik to Mr. Balvin and to the Anonymous Writer of "Who is damaging the Labor Movement" In the first place, Mr. Balvin, I am not an organizer of the Industrial Workers of the World and I did not arrive among the Czechs in the last fourteen days, for I have lived among them eighteen years and I have been active in the labor movement during this entire period. I never sought to gain personal or selfish advantages and my aims always were to aid and not to hinder this idealistic movement.

    I am a member of the working class and I can never advocate ideas which are injurious to this class. One of these is the idea being spread 2by Socialists, that only through political action can workingmen triumph. Every strike lost is an opportunity welcomed by them to confirm this false view.

    If the strike is won and higher wages obtained, they maintain that it means nothing because the capitalists will get it back through higher prices. The result of this false viewpoint is that these people endeavor to use every strike for the benefit of their political party. They are active in the union movement only for those reasons. The rottener the union organization, the better it suits their purposes. That's why they stick so tenaciously to the American Federation of Labor. At the last convention of the American Federation of Labor, eighty Socialists were present and they all voted for Gompers. In the Chicago Federation of Labor, not one Socialist protested against the acceptance of the agreement with Hart, Schaffner and Marx and to the last one they all voted for it. I have never knowingly lied 3and I again assert, that every accusation brought against Mr. Balvin, can be substantiated by any delegate to the conference. I was chairman of the last two meetings of the conference and know whereof I speak. Neither Trautman nor I forced ourselves among you. Trautman and Haywood were invited by the strikers to take charge of the strike. I was asked by Trautman, because he did not know the Czech language and thought that I would be of assistance in many respects. Your insinuation that we were more interested in the assessments than in the members, I reject as a common barefaced insult. We urge no one to become a member of the Industrial Workers of 4the World. We are open and above board, and say only what we think and nothing more.

    In so far as the anonymous article is concerned, in which I am censured for my membership in the American Federation and in the Painters Union, it will not dissuade me from my intention to point out the wanton corruption within them. That I write to newspapers which you proclaim as non-union is only your fault, not mine. When I sent you a communication for publication, you returned it to me. If your paper is so strictly a labor paper, why did you accept a full page ad from the ultra-capitalistic Tribune? In that advertisement the reading of the Tribune, which in the year 1886 recommended lead pills and strychnine for striking labor, 5was recommended to workingmen. It was not Hlasatel which was breaking the strike, but the corruption and unfitness of the Garment Workers' Union and the Federation of Labor, as you yourselves have acknowledged and to whom you are giving such stout aid.

    We have enough laws, more than are needed, but what we need is someone to enforce them. Inspectors allow themselves to be bribed, but labor organized into the right kind of unions will see to it that every work-room, every factory, every mine is safe for the health and life of the workers. Labor organized into an industrial union, will be the political power which will enforce these various laws for the safety of the workers.

    6

    Labor will not allow itself to be murdered any more, as happened at the Cherry mine and other places. Being aware that it has the support of the entire force of the working class, organized into one union, it will never work where it constantly sees death before it. Labor in the present day craft unions has no power,no resistance, because every trade is for itself and the result of all this is strikes lost, and broken and the workingmen delivered to the mercies of more brutal treatment than before. Here is where you gentlemen of Spravedlnost should do your duty and criticize everything that is not fair; pay more attention to the struggles of workers in the factories, meanwhile, uncovering corruption in the labor 7movement, because that is far more important than to call attention to corruption in politics. Every strike lost indicates weakness, and lack of confidence of the workers in themselves, but every strike won means a step forward, an inclination to further struggle. Every raise in wages and shortening of hours of labor means better conditions for the workers.

    If Soravedlnost will work in this manner, then will it have the right to call itself a labor paper, but not before.

    Be consistent in the principles of Socialism and no one will criticize you. Aiding Rickert and others in their work and keeping Bohemian workers 8on strike, in order to help traitors, was certainly miserable conduct for a "labor" paper.

    I have read carefully every attack upon my accusations, published in that paper, but nowhere, I say, nowhere, did they disprove anything I charged and even if the writer of the anonymous article claims that Spravedlnost did not proclaim the first agreement with Hart, Schaffner and Marx as a big victory for tailoring workers, still he cannot erase it for it is printed there in large letters.

    A. Uzlik

    The Reply of Mr. A. Uzlik to Mr. Balvin and to the Anonymous Writer of "Who is damaging the Labor Movement" In the first place, Mr. Balvin, I am not ...

    Bohemian
    I D 2 a 2, II B 2 d 1, I D 2 a 3, I D 2 a 4, I D 1 a, I F 6, I H
  • Denní Hlasatel -- March 11, 1911
    Cesko Americka Narodni Rada (Bohemian-American National Council)

    A promising step toward its realization was taken yesterday through its organizer, E. St. Vraz. The Bohemian-American National Council, as explained by its organizer, Mr. E. St. Vraz, in a meeting held in Pilsen Sokol hall yesterday, will be an organization having a colossal signification for our national life. Therefore, it is not strange that thus far its organization has not been completed, only a few of the foundation stones for its creation have been laid. Chief among these are the interest and enthusiasm which the organizer aroused among those present for this grand institution.

    The meeting was called to order by Mr. Vraz in the presence of a group of sincere patriots, who not only by words, but by deeds also, propose 2to work for the realization of this great idea. Mr. Vraz extended a warm welcome to all present, and announced that besides those present, many others had sent their written agreement with this work, excusing themselves for being absent because of participation in other meetings.

    Mr. Vraz, who already has worked several months on the organization of the Bohemian-American National Council, announced that branches have already been established in New York, Cleveland, and Omaha, from whence a telegram was received yesterday, stating that officers had been elected and the branch put upon a firm foundation. Cedar Rapids, St. Paul, Baltimore, and other cities, also are seeking branches. Aside from these, individuals in smaller towns are also applying for positions as trustees, who want to cooperate in the activities of the Council. He said that the work is progressing satisfactorily, that understanding is appearing everywhere, even though there are doubters here and there, which could hardly be expected to be otherwise. All local newspapers, 3with the exception of one labor paper and one weekly, and newspapers from out-of-town, brought sympathetic reports about this movement. However, there are thousands of people who are hoping for the realization of the organization of the Bohemian-American National Council, and look toward this realization with enthusiasm.

    The Bohemian-American National Council will not be a branch of the Bohemian National Council in Prague, but will be an independent body, whose purpose will be the building and fostering of the patriotic characteristics of Bohemian-Americans, so that we can profess our attachment for our kind as a single body.

    Neither will it be merely a big society, which would seek to gain a large number of members, but an organization, in which all will work toward the good of Bohemian-Americans which will be systematically centered. If only so much can be achieved, if in every town, twentyfour 4capable patriotic men should meet once each month to talk over national needs, a great work will be done.

    With what interest, the steps for the realization of the organization of the Bohemian-American National Council are looked upon by the Bohemian National Council in Prague is shown by the characteristic communication which Mr. Vraz read and commented upon. In the motherland, they welcome our efforts with enthusiasm, and hope sincerely that with the founding of this organization, our contacts with the old country will be renewed, at the same time they are promising, that they will make efforts to correct the mistakes which they made in regard to us.

    Mention is also made in this communication of the introduction of patriotic discipline in this country, to which the organizer added that although we do not have it here as yet, perhaps the time will 5come when every American-Czech will learn what his duty is, and will endeavor to live up to it. The realization of our organization is looked upon, as in the communication from the Bohemian National Council, with confidence. It is said here that the future will show how important a role our organization will play in our lives. It will mean the fullest expansion and culmination of Bohemina-American life, and we look toward this with longing.

    A letter from the secretary of the Bohemian National Council also was read, in which are pointed out the many doubts which existed about the success of the organization at the time of its foundation in the mother-country, and the great significance acquired by it in a few years. The secretary asks that the Bohemian-American National Council join with the Bohemian National Council, whereby it would certainly gain in significance, and its independence would in no way suffer therefrom. He also makes mention of financial means, and recommends that necessary 6funds be not obtained by collections, because protests about collections would ensue, but through subscriptions from members and friends.

    The Bohemian-American National Council is to serve so that national sentiment and race consciousness will rise. It may become a branch of the Bohemian National Council, but here in America it will work independently.

    "Our work will be quiet, peaceful, and moral. We will not move mountains, but will work there, where our work, our encouragement, and our support are needed. For that reason, I cannot understand how some papers could say that we want to perform miracles," said the organizer. We will not need much money for our work, but nevertheless, some money is necessary.

    The Bohemian-American National Council will probably be organized along the same lines as the Bohemian National Council, which is made up of 7members and active bodies in the cities, and trustees in the smaller communities. This organization will devote its time to spiritual and deliberative work. Its task will be to oversee the workers on our national field, to review the work of the past, and advise what should take place in the future, and to see to it that the work everywhere goes on systematically and with a purpose. The organization is to have various departments, each of which will have only one certain branch of work to look after, and be able to properly do so. Among these for example are the following:

    The publicity department, which will be one of the most important. That the Bohemian-American Press Bureau should join the Council as such a department has been thought of, and the Press Bureau at its meeting resolved to join the Council as soon as it is requested to do so.

    8

    A department for immigrants, which would look after their interests and see to it that every immigrant became familiar with conditions in this country.

    A department on societies, to be composed of delegates from benevolent and welfare, gymnastic, singing, amateur theatrical, workingmen's societies, etc. This department will have the care of maintaining contacts with all representative societies, and in case of need, advise and encourage them. In cases of national celebrations, to see to it that they demonstrate their full strength and significance.

    The department for enlightenment will sponsor lectures, establish libraries, and reading rooms, and work with every possible means to elevate the already enlightened horizon of the Bohemian people in America.

    The department for youth will endeavor to unite Bohemian-American youth 9into a representative society.

    The industrial department will be composed of Bohemian industrialists who will take care of the expansion of Bohemian industry.

    The department for business will advance the expansion of Bohemian business.

    The department for agriculture, composed of specialists, will act as adviser to people who wish to become farmers, acquainting them with conditions in various parts of the country.

    All told, the Bohemian-American National Council will have about twelve active departments, at the head of which will be experts. From these departments, will emanate initiative and encouragement to strenghten activities wherever need indicates. In that manner, the Bohemian-American 10National Council will become the center and mirror of our whole national, social, enlightened, economic, industrial, and business life.

    This organization will not be concerned so much with a large number of members, but rather with good workers, so that its work will not be hindered by untimely and poorly thought over ideas. It is to be a central body, but nevertheless, embracing all branches.

    The organization of the Bohemian-American National Council is not concerned merely with organizing just another society, but with the concentration of strength and activities.

    During the meeting, a debate arose in regard to the manner in which the necessary money is to be obtained, but because there were so many different ideas exchanged on the matter, nothing definite was done, 11and the matter will be discussed again at the next meeting.

    In view of the fact that the program of the Bohemian-American National Council is so far-reaching, it was resolved to publish it in condensed form, so that societies and the public in general can become thoroughly familiar with it. To take care of this, a committee of five members was chosen, composed of Messrs. E. Stan. Vraz, J. R. Psenka, Professor J. Zmrhal, Miss Suster, and Dr. Ant. Miller.

    It was then resolved to hold the next meeting on the last Friday of this month, March 31, when there will not be any lodge meetings, and anyone interested in the Bohemian-American National Council will be able to attend.

    Thirty-five participants and delegates from lodges presented themselves as members at yesterday's meeting.

    12

    Before adjournment of this meeting, several people, enthused over the course of the meeting, spoke in favor of the movement, whereupon Mr. Vraz thanked them for their participation and urged those present to go to work so that this patriotic work may become a reality in the near future.

    A promising step toward its realization was taken yesterday through its organizer, E. St. Vraz. The Bohemian-American National Council, as explained by its organizer, Mr. E. St. Vraz, in a ...

    Bohemian
    III B 2, I D 2 a 3, II B 2 a, II B 2 g, III B 4, I D 1 b, II D 1, III E, III G, III H, I L
  • Denní Hlasatel -- June 30, 1911
    Sunday Closing

    The clerks employed in paint, hardware, and furniture, stores of Bohemian California, recently requested that they be given Sundays off. The employers gladly agreed to this. Now it depends on the public in order to maintain this deserved advantage to the salespeople, to buy their needs from these stores on Saturdays, when the stores will remain open until ten o'clock in the evening. Sunday closing of these stores will be effective Sunday, June 9. There is no doubt that our countrymen, who welcome every improvement offered the workingmen, will be willing to do all in their power to see to it that Sunday closing of these establishments will become permanent and general.

    The clerks employed in paint, hardware, and furniture, stores of Bohemian California, recently requested that they be given Sundays off. The employers gladly agreed to this. Now it depends on ...

    Bohemian
    I D 2 a 3
  • Denní Hlasatel -- June 02, 1915
    Judicial Elections (Editorial)

    The great masses of our people have not yet a full understanding of the importance of the office of judge and of the judicial elections. Hence, there is a justifiable apprehension that the coming judicial election will be just as poorly participated in as has been the rule with previous judicial elections. The election of judges should be receiving greater attention than any other local or county election. It does not help in the least to have good laws if those who administer them are incompetent. What good would be capable officials, men working conscientiously for the public, if their efforts were to be nullified by injunctions issued by men who should not be sitting on the bench? Our workingmen should be particularly interested in the coming election, and should give their votes only to candidates whom they know for certain to be just to the laboring classes, and firm enough to refuse to become tools of the enemies and exploiters of labor.

    The great masses of our people have not yet a full understanding of the importance of the office of judge and of the judicial elections. Hence, there is a justifiable ...

    Bohemian
    I F 3, I D 2 a 2, I D 2 a 3
  • Denní Hlasatel -- June 17, 1915
    The Strike Ends (Editorial)

    The whole city was paralyzed by the strike of streetcar and elevated railway employees, and if a settlement had not been reached, each additional day of the strike would have caused losses going into millions of dollars. These losses would have had to be borne not only by businessmen, but also, and to the greatest extent, by the workingmen, who were put to all kinds of inconvenience by the strike. The stopping of all transportation in a city such as Chicago, having two million people, is an event which concerns, not merely one certain business or industry, but the whole population that depends on transportation to the centers of business and industry in the city. Any strike of long duration is bound to cause much inconvenience and financial loss, not only to the strikers and the owners of the companies, but through the stopping of streetcar transportation, loss of comfort and money for everybody. Thousands of people were deprived of the means of transportation Monday morning. They had to start out 2walking, take a railway train, hire or use an automobile or some other vehicle; and these emergency expedients cost more money, and did not offer any assurance that the riders would arrive in time at their places of business, to say nothing of the discomfort which our people were bound to feel, in spite of the fact that they are accustomed to poor transportation and that the average Chicagoan is used to, and can stand, a lot of abuse.

    Railway companies running suburban trains had promised that they would take care of the transportation needs of hundreds of thousands of people, but it was evident during the strike that they were not in a position to handle such large multitudes, even if they really made an honest effort to satisfy the needs of the public. The transportation on suburban railways was beneath criticism during rush hours, and there appeared to be little hope that any substantial improvement could take place in case the strike should be a longer one. It seems absolutely impossible for the railways to replace the enormous net of streetcar and elevated lines, no matter how many trains are added to the normal ones.

    3

    The West Siders suffered most, as always. The needs of the North Side and the South Side are always taken better care of and the transportation there, while leaving much to be desired, was incomparably better than to the Northwest, West, and Southwest Sides. The only transportation available to our communities from Pilsen way down to Hawthorne, Morton Park, and Berwyn, was the Burlington Railroad, and that railroad did not put forth any special effort to add a sufficient number of special trains; it even refused to permit stops where they were most necessary.

    To all these troubles and dangers of injury of various kinds, the immense financial losses that the businessman and the workingman had to suffer must be added.

    Another thing, any prolongation of the strike would have increased the danger of serious riots and bloodshed. These could be easily caused by the transportation companies in case they should hire strikebreakers, scabs, to operate their streetcars and trains. The City Council, true enough, has passed an ordinance prohibiting the hiring of strikebreakers, but there was no certainty that the 4Mayor would sign it, or that if he did, a judge would not be found who would designate such an ordinance as unconstitutional. Another sign of danger was the preparation made by the police. These were hardly of a nature to promote quiet and peace, although it was maintained that they were made for the protection of lives and property. The circumstance that the Chief of Police asked the City Council for more policemen and, what is worse, for money with which to purchase 50,000 rounds of ammunition, was of a very disquiting character and liable to call forth clashes. The City Hall has refused such untimely and unreasonable requests, and that action deserves the approval of every sensible person.

    Nobody was in a position to foretell that the strike would end so soon, and there were justifiable apprehensions that conditions would grow from bad to worse every day.

    The Chicago public is definitely in agreement about the contention that the strike should never have been permitted to take place. It was up to the 5companies, and particularly to the city, which derives a profit from the streetcars that reaches the million figure, to prevent it. It is generally known that the wages of streetcar employees are lower than in any other comparable business, and that the companies make large enough profits to pay big dividends even after paying fifty-five per cent of their earnings into the city treasury. The elevated lines do not pay anything to the city, keeping all the profits to themselves, and thus they were in a still better position to raise their employees' wages. But they refused to do it, and no proving that the employees' demands were justified was of any avail.

    In spite of the discomforts caused by the strike the public was in sympathy with the strikers. It was of the opinion that their wages should be raised, but also, and definitely, of the opinion that the strike should have been prevented. And prevented it would have been if the companies had been at all concerned about the needs and the benefit of the public. But such concern, after the experience the Chicago public has had with the companies, could hardly have been expected. For years the Chicago public has been endeavoring to get better transportation, 6but the companies have never given a bit more than they were forced to by threats or by courts. It is therefore unthinkable that they would have raised their employees' wages without being compelled to do so. Such an attitude is not likely to increase the companies' popularity, and this last strike has increased the public's hate of the streetcar monopoly. One result of this strike will be that the public will resume the demand for public ownership of the transportation facilities, a demand which has not been heard in recent times. That this would be the case was proved in the recent meeting of the Municipal Council, where a proposal was made that the city take over the whole transportation system and conduct it, under conditions favorable to the employees, until the companies have made up their minds to give the Chicago public their transportation back.

    A proposal of so radical a character, while it would bring about a rapid ending of the strike, was not accepted, but it is a significant indication of the attitude of some of the Aldermen and certainly of a large portion of the public, 7which has the right to demand that the streetcar companies, for their big earnings, give the proper consideration to its needs.

    The whole city was paralyzed by the strike of streetcar and elevated railway employees, and if a settlement had not been reached, each additional day of the strike would have ...

    Bohemian
    I D 2 a 4, I D 2 a 3, I D 1 a
  • Denní Hlasatel -- October 06, 1915
    The Sdruzeni Ceskych Krejcovskych Kontraktoru Goes with the Workers

    The news that the Sdruzeni Ceskych Krejcovskych Kontraktoru (Bohemian Tailoring Contractors' Association) has agreed to stop work in their shops and thus help in ending the strike in the near future has been received with a great deal of enthusiasm by the striking workers. Although some contractors were against this agreement and declared they would continue working for firms affected by the strike, the men on strike are confident that these contractors also will be made to stop working if the majority of other contractors will follow that policy. The men believe that contractors who refuse to stop working will provoke a strong feeling against themselves on the part of the public, which is overwhelmingly in sympathy with the workers. There are very few contractors who would want to hear the anger and loathing of their neighbors by helping the manufacturers to subdue the workingmen. The majority of contractors sympathize with 2the workers and not many of them will want to continue working under police protection in the neighborhood of honest and peace-loving people.....

    The news that the Sdruzeni Ceskych Krejcovskych Kontraktoru (Bohemian Tailoring Contractors' Association) has agreed to stop work in their shops and thus help in ending the strike in the near ...

    Bohemian
    I D 2 a 4, I D 2 a 3, I D 1 a, I D 1 b