The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Denní Hlasatel -- February 03, 1910
    Veteran Actor Honored

    P.2--The flower of Bohemian society is expected to be present at the Garrick Theater next Sunday to render homage to a most deserving man and to celebrate a jubilee the like of which we have never before seen, and which even in the land of our origin, is of rare occurrence. On this occasion Frank Ludvik's completion of fifty years of activity as the director of the permanent Bohemian theater in Chicago will be commemorated.

    It will be honor accorded to one to whom honor is due. Mr. Ludvik began his artistic career when Bohemian sentiment and national consciousness needed to be awakened, and it is certain that he has accomplished very much along this line. In those days Bohemian books and Bohemian actors were the only friends to cheer Bohemian immigrants and save them for a better future. And for Bohemian-Americans this Bohemian theater still remains an important national and educational institution. Our veteran artist had the ambition and the energy to make his foundation accomplish the utmost possible good, and the effect of its activities penetrated all strata of our people and perpetuated their love for the land of their birth.

    2

    However, not only as a national worker but also as an artist Mr. Ludvik deserves that his jubilee shall be a magnificent manifestation of the gratitude which the Bohemians of Chicago owe to him. Whoever has attended the performances in our theater--and what Bohemian has not?--must inevitably remember with pleasure, those delightful characterizations, informed with life and elaborated in their minutest details, which Ludvik has created on the stage. In both comic and serious parts he has proved himself to be, the talented, assiduous artist; and as such, he should be saluted on next Sunday.

    The personal, human side of Mr. Ludvik's character is so attractive, that every one who comes in contact with him becomes his friend. His modest manners, cheerful temperament, and sincere address, win for him daily the good will of new acquaintances.

    P.2--The flower of Bohemian society is expected to be present at the Garrick Theater next Sunday to render homage to a most deserving man and to celebrate a jubilee the ...

    Bohemian
    II A 3 d 1, I D 1 b, III A, IV
  • Denní Hlasatel -- February 08, 1910
    Editor Exposes Pries-Fixing

    P.4--The high cost of living is now being investigated by Congress and will probably be studied in the State legislature and the city hall. How much value can be assigned to all this work remains a question. Researches into the matter of high prices have been conducted by newspapers in more thorough fashion than by official bodies. Neither one of these groups has had much success in discovering the real causes of the phenomenon and in fixing the responsibility therefore on the right persons. Every one of the witnesses called on the stand by Congress denies and connection with the price-controlling element and winds up with the halo of innocence around his head.

    It is, by the way, rather easy to establish the truth. Most of the dealers in victuals are not engaged in other activities. Their income is derived solely from the sale of food-stuffs. Consequently one has only to observe the increase in their wealth to get at the bottom of the whole matter. In other words, it is a case of keeping still and watching, it grow.

    Certain "economists, people who write books but know nothing about real life, assign the blame for rising prices to the huge amount of gold produced. 2The more gold there is, say these people, the less the value of money is. This kind of reasoning is preposterous. Deflation would cause everything to rise in price, including human labor. The working-man's wages, however, hover constantly below a certain variable minimum. Other groups of people, notably those who write for our American newspapers, accuse the public, charging them with wastefulness and prodigality. People are too fastidious, they say; they want only the most expensive articles and throw away half the things which they buy, whereas if they were thrifty, prices would go down. Against this theory we can set the fact, that high prices prevail in other countries as well as in America, in countries where waste is out of the question; for example, in Germany, where people eat horse-meat and dog-meat, or in France and England, where the populace has had to lower its standard of living, and also in Bohemia, from which many complaints are reaching us daily.

    The conclusion reached by the newspapers appears to be incorrect for another reason, namely, that the rise in prices has been very rapid, especially in the last few years, and it is hardly possible that all the people have become Sybarites and epicures within that short time.

    3

    The meat-barons and the kings of the corn exchange have tried recently to shift the burden of responsibility to the shoulders of the farmers "who grow fat on the rising prices." It is therefore only proper to hear the farmers' opinion. One of them gives a detailed account of the cost of raising an animal up to the time, when it becomes marketable and proves that the prices are raised the moment it gets into the stockyards. All the cattle in the markets of St. Louis, Fort Worth, Kansas City, Omaha, Sioux City, and Chicago are bought by four big packing concerns, who within a few years have each accumulated property worth from thirty million to a hundred million dollars. These data speak for themselves. The rich men are the packers, not the farmers; among farmers there is only one millionaire and that is David Rankin of Tarkin, Missouri, who became wealthy by speculating in real estate.

    P.4--The high cost of living is now being investigated by Congress and will probably be studied in the State legislature and the city hall. How much value can be assigned ...

    Bohemian
    I H, I D 1 a, I D 1 b
  • Denní Hlasatel -- February 09, 1910
    A Monument for Havlicek

    P.5--Fellow-countrymen, compatriots! In the month of October a significant celebration will occur full of patriotic meaning for all Bohemian-Americans, namely, the unveiling of the monument of Karel Havlicek Borovsky. The statue has been completed in Prague and is ready to be shipped to Chicago. The committee is about to contract for the accessories required and for the work involved according to the plans formulated by the architects of the park board; but alas, a great amount of the money necessary is still lacking, and so we address the Bohemian public, hoping that this will be the last time that we shall be compelled to do so.

    We are asking urgently for help so that we may finish a work highly important for us Bohemians! "The world is impelled by active forces," says one 2of our proverbs. Well, let us exert our strength, and the future will bring the results of honest work. Even a small nation, transplanted to foreign soil, can, produce worthy fruit; if it possesses self-esteem and love for its sacred traditions and its rights, it can stand proudly side by side with other nations. We can prove that we are not merely scattered immigrants,--that Bohemians are not fallen leaves but healthy, fresh off-shoots of the old stock,--that we are a nation, not only in Europe but in America as well.

    In looking over the list of collections for the monument of our martyred statesman, we get the impression that the greatest enthusiasm for this patriotic enterprise is registered in the American rural districts. Bohemian Chicago, that Bohemian metropolis where a third of all the Bohemian societies in this country are located, remains cool toward Havlicek! We find, true enough, several enthusiastic manifestations of enthusiasm, as for instance Sokol Slavsky with a hundred-dollar donation and some contributions of fifty dollars; but these few seem to have no emulators.

    However, it is not yet too late. Bohemian Chicago will do its duty. In 3Bohemia they are completing a collection of three millions for the Central School Fund (Matice Skolska), but we in Chicago are having difficulty in collecting the $3,000 still required for the accomplishment of an aim of paramount national importance!. Shall we give up like cowards? We may well complain that our system of Bohemian schools is in a pitiful condition; but if we show no interest in the monument, we demonstrate that our indifference to the school problem as well; we show that we are merely a cultural fertilizer, absorbed in the mass of foreign elements!

    We therefore appeal to the intelligent strata of the Bohemian populace, which are always the public spokesmen of our Bohemian sentiments; we appeal to the Bohemian corporations and enterprises for donations, be they ever so small,--to Bohemian businessmen, professional men, and tradesmen, (though we know that they are not lying on any bed of roses); we appeal to Bohemian journalism for its loyal support, and last but not least, to Bohemian labor, whose beacon-light Havlicek has ever been.

    It is only by combining our forces that we can realize a long-cherished dream by unveiling the monument of Havlicek on the anniversary of his birth, 4October 31. By doing this the Bohemian nation will demonstrate the high level of its culture, its strength, and its undaunted spirit.

    P.5--Fellow-countrymen, compatriots! In the month of October a significant celebration will occur full of patriotic meaning for all Bohemian-Americans, namely, the unveiling of the monument of Karel Havlicek Borovsky. The ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 c, II B 2 d 1, I A 1 a, I D 1 b, II A 1, II A 2, II D 1, III A, III G, III H
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 20, 1911
    For Czech Mutual Aid Societies (Advertisement)

    "Don't believe them, don't give them anything!" These are the words of our unforgetable Havlichek, and they may be appropriately applied to some of the propagators of mutual aid societies among foreign nationalities. And for what good reason, then, do our fellow countrymen join those associations, when their interests can be equally well served by Czech organizations? There is a club, now being formed, which is to be attached to the Lozhe Cech (Czeh Lodge) No. 25, of the thriving Ches. Slov. Jednota (Czecho Slavonic Union). The membership and medical aid are free of charge. Prospective members may sign up in Schnabl's Tavern, 26th St., and Trumbull Ave.; at Mr. Fischer's, Lawndale Ave. and 26th St., at Mr. Slama's Throop St. and 18th St., at Mr. Soukup's 25th St. and Sawyer Ave.; and with Mr. Richard Hegner, a member of the agitation committee, 2522 So. Hamlin Ave.

    "Don't believe them, don't give them anything!" These are the words of our unforgetable Havlichek, and they may be appropriately applied to some of the propagators of mutual aid societies ...

    Bohemian
    II D 1, I D 1 b, III B 2, III A, I C
  • Denní Hlasatel -- January 29, 1911
    Two Czech Papers at Loggerheads

    Taking issue with the attacks directed against us during the recent strikes of the garment workers, we feel under an obligation to state our side of the case. What has been done to us was unjust. We suffered and bore it without complaint, though we knew it to be false. Now we want to let the public know the truth.

    The strike has been taken advantage of by a great number of people who are totally indifferent toward the welfare of the working-men and who seized the opportunity, created by the general confusion, to climb upon the back of the worker and grab what they could get away with. To banish any thought that we might purposely omit names, we proclaim openly that we mean the people of the Spravedlnost, when we refer to those who give preference to their own interests over the welfare of the striking workers. It was foremost in thier mind to 2help put their decaying paper upon its feet. Had they riveted their attention to the questions that were paramount in importance, the strike would have taken a somewhat different turn.

    We have bent our efforts toward truthful reporting, carefully refraining from mentioning news of a nature inciting to unrest, for we are well aware of the difficulties that mar the results of arbitration in negotiations with men under the influence of violent emotions. At the same time, we know well enough that it is more profitable to rouse a crowd to a high pitch of fanaticism, wait for the crucial moment, and then to retreat, leaving others in the front. Such were the tactics employed by the Spraveldnost.

    From the very beginning of the strike we have made it a rule not to accept advertisements concerning the workers, never minding the 3antagonistic sentiment we thus aroused against ourselves among the strikers, as we contemplated the predicament of many a small contractor fighting for his existence; but our pacifistic efforts were not appreciated by him either.

    In the strikers' meetings little was said for the useful information of the workers; most of the time was spent in harassing the crowd and getting subscribers for the Spravedlnost, Mr. Balvin, chairman of the strike committee, never lets an opportunity pass to yell his field cry, "I am a Socialist, and I work for Socialism!" Mr. Kostka, of the Spravedlnost, is another leader who works for his own salvation, just as Mr. Balvin "works for Socialism" and not for the good of the workmen.

    The Czech tailors will keep on thinking of this strike with a bitter taste in their mouths. The management of the strike was, on the whole, 4conducted in an able manner and with some sincerity; the meetings, however, were usually polluted by speakers and others who had no business to be present. This dampened the spirits of those seriously concerned and discouraged men cannot win a strike. The Czech workers certainly know their duties better than those of any other nation, but it is not the Spravedlnost that is responsible for this fact. That paper took the strike into its own hands and brought it to its conclusion - a glaring failure.

    We wish to call the attention of the public to the direction in which the flood of editorial and forensic abuse was hurled against the Denni Hlasatel only, for other papers, e.g., the Narod, which had taken a pronounced anti-strike attitude, were left unmolested. Why? They draw few subscribers and so are harmless. In the beginning of the strike we lost, through the Spravedlnost's agitation, about 150 subscribers, most of whom have returned to us, now that they see the light.

    Taking issue with the attacks directed against us during the recent strikes of the garment workers, we feel under an obligation to state our side of the case. What has ...

    Bohemian
    I D 2 a 4, II B 2 d 1, I D 1 b, I C
  • Denní Hlasatel -- March 11, 1911
    Cesko Americka Narodni Rada (Bohemian-American National Council)

    A promising step toward its realization was taken yesterday through its organizer, E. St. Vraz. The Bohemian-American National Council, as explained by its organizer, Mr. E. St. Vraz, in a meeting held in Pilsen Sokol hall yesterday, will be an organization having a colossal signification for our national life. Therefore, it is not strange that thus far its organization has not been completed, only a few of the foundation stones for its creation have been laid. Chief among these are the interest and enthusiasm which the organizer aroused among those present for this grand institution.

    The meeting was called to order by Mr. Vraz in the presence of a group of sincere patriots, who not only by words, but by deeds also, propose 2to work for the realization of this great idea. Mr. Vraz extended a warm welcome to all present, and announced that besides those present, many others had sent their written agreement with this work, excusing themselves for being absent because of participation in other meetings.

    Mr. Vraz, who already has worked several months on the organization of the Bohemian-American National Council, announced that branches have already been established in New York, Cleveland, and Omaha, from whence a telegram was received yesterday, stating that officers had been elected and the branch put upon a firm foundation. Cedar Rapids, St. Paul, Baltimore, and other cities, also are seeking branches. Aside from these, individuals in smaller towns are also applying for positions as trustees, who want to cooperate in the activities of the Council. He said that the work is progressing satisfactorily, that understanding is appearing everywhere, even though there are doubters here and there, which could hardly be expected to be otherwise. All local newspapers, 3with the exception of one labor paper and one weekly, and newspapers from out-of-town, brought sympathetic reports about this movement. However, there are thousands of people who are hoping for the realization of the organization of the Bohemian-American National Council, and look toward this realization with enthusiasm.

    The Bohemian-American National Council will not be a branch of the Bohemian National Council in Prague, but will be an independent body, whose purpose will be the building and fostering of the patriotic characteristics of Bohemian-Americans, so that we can profess our attachment for our kind as a single body.

    Neither will it be merely a big society, which would seek to gain a large number of members, but an organization, in which all will work toward the good of Bohemian-Americans which will be systematically centered. If only so much can be achieved, if in every town, twentyfour 4capable patriotic men should meet once each month to talk over national needs, a great work will be done.

    With what interest, the steps for the realization of the organization of the Bohemian-American National Council are looked upon by the Bohemian National Council in Prague is shown by the characteristic communication which Mr. Vraz read and commented upon. In the motherland, they welcome our efforts with enthusiasm, and hope sincerely that with the founding of this organization, our contacts with the old country will be renewed, at the same time they are promising, that they will make efforts to correct the mistakes which they made in regard to us.

    Mention is also made in this communication of the introduction of patriotic discipline in this country, to which the organizer added that although we do not have it here as yet, perhaps the time will 5come when every American-Czech will learn what his duty is, and will endeavor to live up to it. The realization of our organization is looked upon, as in the communication from the Bohemian National Council, with confidence. It is said here that the future will show how important a role our organization will play in our lives. It will mean the fullest expansion and culmination of Bohemina-American life, and we look toward this with longing.

    A letter from the secretary of the Bohemian National Council also was read, in which are pointed out the many doubts which existed about the success of the organization at the time of its foundation in the mother-country, and the great significance acquired by it in a few years. The secretary asks that the Bohemian-American National Council join with the Bohemian National Council, whereby it would certainly gain in significance, and its independence would in no way suffer therefrom. He also makes mention of financial means, and recommends that necessary 6funds be not obtained by collections, because protests about collections would ensue, but through subscriptions from members and friends.

    The Bohemian-American National Council is to serve so that national sentiment and race consciousness will rise. It may become a branch of the Bohemian National Council, but here in America it will work independently.

    "Our work will be quiet, peaceful, and moral. We will not move mountains, but will work there, where our work, our encouragement, and our support are needed. For that reason, I cannot understand how some papers could say that we want to perform miracles," said the organizer. We will not need much money for our work, but nevertheless, some money is necessary.

    The Bohemian-American National Council will probably be organized along the same lines as the Bohemian National Council, which is made up of 7members and active bodies in the cities, and trustees in the smaller communities. This organization will devote its time to spiritual and deliberative work. Its task will be to oversee the workers on our national field, to review the work of the past, and advise what should take place in the future, and to see to it that the work everywhere goes on systematically and with a purpose. The organization is to have various departments, each of which will have only one certain branch of work to look after, and be able to properly do so. Among these for example are the following:

    The publicity department, which will be one of the most important. That the Bohemian-American Press Bureau should join the Council as such a department has been thought of, and the Press Bureau at its meeting resolved to join the Council as soon as it is requested to do so.

    8

    A department for immigrants, which would look after their interests and see to it that every immigrant became familiar with conditions in this country.

    A department on societies, to be composed of delegates from benevolent and welfare, gymnastic, singing, amateur theatrical, workingmen's societies, etc. This department will have the care of maintaining contacts with all representative societies, and in case of need, advise and encourage them. In cases of national celebrations, to see to it that they demonstrate their full strength and significance.

    The department for enlightenment will sponsor lectures, establish libraries, and reading rooms, and work with every possible means to elevate the already enlightened horizon of the Bohemian people in America.

    The department for youth will endeavor to unite Bohemian-American youth 9into a representative society.

    The industrial department will be composed of Bohemian industrialists who will take care of the expansion of Bohemian industry.

    The department for business will advance the expansion of Bohemian business.

    The department for agriculture, composed of specialists, will act as adviser to people who wish to become farmers, acquainting them with conditions in various parts of the country.

    All told, the Bohemian-American National Council will have about twelve active departments, at the head of which will be experts. From these departments, will emanate initiative and encouragement to strenghten activities wherever need indicates. In that manner, the Bohemian-American 10National Council will become the center and mirror of our whole national, social, enlightened, economic, industrial, and business life.

    This organization will not be concerned so much with a large number of members, but rather with good workers, so that its work will not be hindered by untimely and poorly thought over ideas. It is to be a central body, but nevertheless, embracing all branches.

    The organization of the Bohemian-American National Council is not concerned merely with organizing just another society, but with the concentration of strength and activities.

    During the meeting, a debate arose in regard to the manner in which the necessary money is to be obtained, but because there were so many different ideas exchanged on the matter, nothing definite was done, 11and the matter will be discussed again at the next meeting.

    In view of the fact that the program of the Bohemian-American National Council is so far-reaching, it was resolved to publish it in condensed form, so that societies and the public in general can become thoroughly familiar with it. To take care of this, a committee of five members was chosen, composed of Messrs. E. Stan. Vraz, J. R. Psenka, Professor J. Zmrhal, Miss Suster, and Dr. Ant. Miller.

    It was then resolved to hold the next meeting on the last Friday of this month, March 31, when there will not be any lodge meetings, and anyone interested in the Bohemian-American National Council will be able to attend.

    Thirty-five participants and delegates from lodges presented themselves as members at yesterday's meeting.

    12

    Before adjournment of this meeting, several people, enthused over the course of the meeting, spoke in favor of the movement, whereupon Mr. Vraz thanked them for their participation and urged those present to go to work so that this patriotic work may become a reality in the near future.

    A promising step toward its realization was taken yesterday through its organizer, E. St. Vraz. The Bohemian-American National Council, as explained by its organizer, Mr. E. St. Vraz, in a ...

    Bohemian
    III B 2, I D 2 a 3, II B 2 a, II B 2 g, III B 4, I D 1 b, II D 1, III E, III G, III H, I L
  • Denní Hlasatel -- May 04, 1911
    Landlords' Association (Advertisement)

    No better method for the dispossession of undesirable tenants can be found than that offered by the Smolik's Landlords' Association (not inc.). The main purpose of the Association is to cause the removal of the undesirable tenants without the loss of much time and expense. We write notices to vacate free of charge, and advise you about all property matters. D. C. Jones, and a Bohemian lawyer, Otto Kerner, are legal representatives of the Association. Membership fee is only one dollar a year. The main office, with Frank J. Smolik in charge, is located at 1852 South Centre Avenue. (Racine Avenue now.)

    No better method for the dispossession of undesirable tenants can be found than that offered by the Smolik's Landlords' Association (not inc.). The main purpose of the Association is to ...

    Bohemian
    I D 1 b
  • Denní Hlasatel -- June 22, 1911
    The Old People's Home and Orphanage Mr. Bunata the Manager of the Institution Was Forced to Tender His Resignation, Which Was Accepted

    The regular monthly meeting of the delegates of the Old People's Home and Orphanage was held last night. In the absence of the chairman Mr. Frydl, the meeting was called to order by the vice-chairman Mr. Leopold Ruzicka. The minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved without correction. The semi-annual report and the report of the management committee were read and approved as read.

    Karel Havlicek Lodge No. 18. C. S. J. (Czech Slovanic Unity) announced as their delegate Mr. Joseph Machar; Mrs. Frantiska Hlavacek, appeared as the delegate for Lodge "Snezka."

    Thirty-five dollars was turned in as a legacy from the estate of Anna Salek.

    2

    The bond of the financial secretary Mr. Ferdinand Svoboda was accepted without protest.

    Several applications for admission to the Home and the Orphanage were referred to the investigation committee.

    Plans of the newly surveyed property of the Institution were introduced and the question was brought up as to whether or not it would be better to move the old building or erect a new building on the north side of the creek, that is, where Mr. Vlaciha's monument works are now located.

    The committee substantiated its view in this respect by the fact that the Institution's taxes would be less and also that the Institution would benefit financially, for Foster Avenue is to be put through and thereby the new tavern would be located at the corner of Fourtieth Avenue and Foster Avenue, while the buildings of the Institution would remain isolated 3on the other bank of the creek. In this way the continuous reference to the tavern in the immediate vicinity of the Institution would be avoided, thereby making it much easier to establish contact with various welfare societies which would yield from $1,500 to $2,000 yearly for the benefit of the Institution. A committee of six members was appointed to take the matter under consideration and with the management decide whether the old building should be moved or a new building erected, and also whether the saloon license can be transferred to the new location.

    The complaint of the manager Mr. Bunata against the management committee and Mrs. Blafka created a painful impression. He complained that the committee was careless and as proof brought forward a certain bill on which he claimed eighteen dollars could have been saved. There is no doubt that Mr. Bunata was mistaken in this respect, for the bill was for kitchen necessities which the women of the committee look after and their 4many years of sacrificing labor in behalf of the Institution is well known.

    The committee completely ignored the charges brought by Mr. Bunata and introduced some facts concerning the manager for consideration, asking the delegates to decide whether or not Mr. Bunata should remain in his position as manager. A lengthy debate ensued until Mr. Bunata, on the advice of several more moderate delegates and to avoid a public scandal, handed in his resignation which was unanimously accepted, whereupon the meeting was adjourned.

    The regular monthly meeting of the delegates of the Old People's Home and Orphanage was held last night. In the absence of the chairman Mr. Frydl, the meeting was called ...

    Bohemian
    II D 5, I D 1 b, II D 4, II D 1
  • Denní Hlasatel -- June 23, 1911
    For the Future Generations Societies and Individuals, Who Contributed Something toward Sokol Chicago's New Hall, Are Assured That Tidings about Them Will Be Preserved for Future Descendants

    The building committee of Sokol Chicago has done everything possible to furnish Bohemian California with a gymnasium and hall that would satisfy all modern requirements. From plans, according to which the construction will be carried out, it is seen that it will be one of the finest Bohemian halls in America. Provisions will be made so that not only the Sokols will find it one of the best-equipped gymnasiums, but so that amateur players will have a stage which will enable them to suitably appear before the public. Other Bohemian lodges will also have headquarters in the building. Even the lodges with large memberships will be able to hold their meetings and satisfy all prescribed rituals there.

    2

    The interior fittings of the hall and lodge rooms will be luxurious and supplemented with dignity by the strong, joyful impression called forth by the enormous building.

    In brief, the Sokol Chicago Hall will be such that not only the Sokol, but all Bohemian California, all Bohemian Chicago, will be proud of it. It is an enormous undertaking and will cost about $45,000.

    Sokol Chicago does not have such great means but it is depending upon other Bohemian societies and our generous countrymen, who recognizing to what advantage and to what honor the new building will serve all Bohemian people, surely will not withhold their aid from so deserving and undertaking.

    This hall will become the focus of Bohemian life: it will become the center of our national efforts; in it sokols, amateurs, and societies will 3look after the preservation of our adolescents for the Bohemian people; it will cultivate Bohemian culture and the Bohemian language. Whoever is concerned about these things, let them give a helping hand towards their realization.

    A building, so sturdily constructed as the Sokol Chicago Hall will be, will bring the glory of the Bohemian name to future generations. In the cornerstone, which will be laid an June 26, the history, societies and individuals who acquired some merit in service for the Sokol building, will be preserved as future mementos of Sokol Chicago and the local Bohemian community. Those societies that would like to have their memorial notes placed in the cornerstone should not delay but should apply immediately. Everyone, be it an individual or a society, who contributes for the construction of the building will be entered on the memorial paper that will be placed in the cornerstone just before it is laid. Those who still wish to make a contribution may do so in the 4clothing establishment of Novak and Sebek at Twenty-second and Troy Streets. The office will be at this address during the entire period of construction.

    The building committee of Sokol Chicago has done everything possible to furnish Bohemian California with a gymnasium and hall that would satisfy all modern requirements. From plans, according to which ...

    Bohemian
    II D 6, I D 1 b, III B 2, II D 1, III E
  • Denní Hlasatel -- August 18, 1911
    Lots for Sale (Advertisement)

    From the Town of Lake.

    Fifty dollars cash, balance on easy monthly payments will buy lots on 47th Street, and 47th Place between Western Avenue, and Campbell Avenue. For sale only by Joseph F. Triska & Co., 1945 W. 47th St.

    From the Town of Lake. Fifty dollars cash, balance on easy monthly payments will buy lots on 47th Street, and 47th Place between Western Avenue, and Campbell Avenue. For sale ...

    Bohemian
    I D 1 b