The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Svornost -- June 15, 1878
    (No headline)

    Teach them, an honest mechanic has a greater value even though he has no possessions or wealth, than a dozen well-dressed, slick, high-toned idlers.

    Teach them to have pleasure in nature through gardening. Being financially able, teach them music, painting and fine arts, but keep in mind that these accomplishments are not necessities.

    Teach them, to that to take a walk along the promenade is better than to go riding and that flowers growing wild are much more beautiful to one who knows how to observe them carefully.

    Teach them, to disdain hypocrisy and, whether, yes or no, we should do likewise.

    Teach them, matrimonial happiness does not depend upon outside influences nor upon the husband's property but upon his character.

    Having taught them these things and if they understand them, let them seek a mate. They will not go astray even without your assistance.

    Teach them, an honest mechanic has a greater value even though he has no possessions or wealth, than a dozen well-dressed, slick, high-toned idlers. Teach them to have pleasure in ...

    Bohemian
    I B 3 b
  • Svornost -- April 12, 1879
    A Review of the Compulsory School Attendance Law.

    Enemies of the law for compulsory school attendance of children between the ages of 8 and 14 years, among whom is found the "Chicago Times" condemn this law and it's regulations. The objections they put forth can readily be dismissed by any reasonably sensible man, who is concerned about the welfare of the community as a whole, and the safe guarding of the rights of all those who in some instance may need the protection of law.

    They claim the State has no right, much less any obligation, to take children from the control of the parents, to raise and educate them against their will other wise, unless the parents so wish it. Such disregard of rights originates in Prussia and is pure and simple despotism, where every inhabitant belongs to the State and the State must provide all his necessities and watch over him. The American principles are that the citizen belongs only to himself, that he is free, and that the State is maintained only for the purpose of assuring his freedom, not for the purpose of putting him under it's protection and regulating his life.

    2

    The Prussian principle is that people are created for the State. The American principle is that the government is created for the people and that more government than is actually necessary to preserve the liberty of the citizenry is despotism. Therefore they claim that the only plane upon which compulsory attendance of schools can be placed is Despotism. These principles however, are undemocratic and contrary to out system of personal rights, which the government should guard against any curtailment.

    They say this kind of law would be as unenforcible as a law prohibiting the drinking of alcoholic liquors, or any other law tampering with our private domestic affairs. It is indeed a strange exposition of the principles of liberty and duty.

    The whole fault of this reasoning, knowingly committed, remains in the fact that they out children on the same level with the parents; they put them on the same plane as other mature citizens. They refuse to admit that children can not be compared with mature citizens, because in the first place they dont know and cannot know their rights for they would not understand them if they were being told and they are 3unable to guard their rights in any manner. Education cannot be forcibly administered in some coercive institution. That is true. We do not expect to force any one with a whip to become a Doctor or Professor if he has not the will nor ambition for it. However, everyone even the poorest and most indifferent can be persuaded while his mind is still pliant, to learn reading, writing and arithmetic thereby reducing the possibility of becoming an uneducated loafer when he has grown up, knowing nothing and seeking his livelihood in thievery.

    According to their objections the State would not have the right, even, to force convicted criminals to learn anything and if they had no trade would be compelled to keep them in idleness. The final argument of the "Limes" that this system which would force children from the home to school like convicts under sentence, would lower the morale and standards of the schools so that none would care to brag that they went to school is sheer nonsense. Only when children begin to show more common sense, can there be any talk of voluntary school attendance. We are of the opinion that all of the objections put forth by the enemies of compulsory education are worthless and that Illinois should have a law compelling parents to send their children to schools.

    Enemies of the law for compulsory school attendance of children between the ages of 8 and 14 years, among whom is found the "Chicago Times" condemn this law and it's ...

    Bohemian
    I A 1 a, I B 3 b
  • Svornost -- January 08, 1890
    [Children Should Be Sent to School]

    The State of Illinois has experienced considerable difficulty in forcing the foreign-born in sending their children to school. When asked why they did not send their children to school, they would reply that they had no money or clothes to send the children to school with. When that was furnished they still did not send them.

    Finally Mrs. Axford, a woman with a twelve year old boy, whom she refused to send to school after repeated orders, was made an example of. She was brought before the judge, fined $20.00 and forced to send the boy to school. This example made the other recalcitrant parents take notice and as a consequence the school was crowded on the following day.

    The law is that all children must attend school form the ages of 7 to 14. Heretofore, small children were sent to factories and lot of them had no schooling at all, leaving them illiterate. The English language is taught in all schools, whether they be secular or public and all children should be given an opportunity to acquire an education.

    The State of Illinois has experienced considerable difficulty in forcing the foreign-born in sending their children to school. When asked why they did not send their children to school, they ...

    Bohemian
    I A 1 a, I B 3 b
  • Denní Hlasatel -- June 02, 1904
    [Using the Bohemian Language]

    It is true, we can be great Bohemians and patriots upon pompous occasions, but are we such in minuteness? Indeed we are not, let us say it to ourselves candidly. For instance, we maintain Bohemian schools, we send our children to them, wishing that they shall, learn to read and write Bohemian. This is praisworthy, to be sure, because it is not only our national duty but it may serve as a practical advantage for our children at sometime. That man, who is better educated than the other, is always better off and more respected. With what pride heaves the breast of that father, who at some time visits the school and hears his child reading Bohemian. Often this father is a respected businessman, and has his countrymen to thank for his material success. Now let us examine his place of business; we begin on the outside, by reading the sign-boards. Sometimes it almost staggers a person the way our Bohemian is murdered on them.

    It is a shame, actually a shame and to good Bohemians it serves not only as ridicule but often is insulting to their feelings. And if we enter a place of business, a genuine Bohemian place of business, we must be prepared to hear every other language spoken, except Bohemian.

    2

    Only after we announce ourselves as Bohemians, are we spoken to in Bohemian, but how! To be sure, this only concerns some of the business places, not all of them, but it should not be thus anywhere. Or when we attend a Bohemian entertainment, what language do we hear spoken there? Only the old people speak Bohemian among themselves, but the young people, their children? Well, go and listen to them, surely you will admit the truth of the assertion, that our youth speaks mostly English at these entertainments. This is not right, decidedly not. The old people should advise the youth and impress upon their hearts that they should entertain themselves in their company in the language of their parents, then we could call ourselves true patriots. Let no one have any fear, that because their child speaks good Bohemian it will not learn English. There is no need to be apprehensive on that account because the child will more easily learn the English language and will never forget it.

    It is true, we can be great Bohemians and patriots upon pompous occasions, but are we such in minuteness? Indeed we are not, let us say it to ourselves candidly. ...

    Bohemian
    III A, I B 3 b
  • Denní Hlasatel -- June 22, 1904
    [Racial Patriotism in Americans and in Bohemians]

    P.4---Those fellow-countrymen of ours who condemn all patriotic efforts of American Bohemians, who think that our greatest good lies in quickly forgetting the cradle of our race and becoming Americanized, ought to take as their example the Americans themselves, whose English origin dates back to the long ago. These people, even though America is really their native land, since their parents, their grandparents, and their great-grandparents were born and died here, retain their friendly feeling for the English nation, as is evident from the sympathy which they express for the English people at every opportunity. They always give preference to an Englishman over a Bohemian or a German, even though the latter has long been a citizen. The impulse which prompts them is racial patriotism. Why then should a Bohemian who has just received his citizenship papers regard his brother-immigrant with misgiving and consider a Yankee as closer to him? Many of our American fellow-countrymen would certainly be ashamed of themselves if they examined their consciences. That our compatriots so easily and quickly forget their native land and their racial origin is due to faulty upbringing and insufficient schooling. The blame for this rests on their unenlightened parents, who often--we must admit with shame--are proud that their children do not know Bohemian and speak only English.

    P.4---Those fellow-countrymen of ours who condemn all patriotic efforts of American Bohemians, who think that our greatest good lies in quickly forgetting the cradle of our race and becoming Americanized, ...

    Bohemian
    III A, I A 1 b, I B 3 b, I C, III G, I J
  • Denní Hlasatel -- February 28, 1905
    Announcement

    P.2--A year ago several of us, Bohemian professional women, formed a group for the purpose of self-education in important matters of the day. We dared not appear before the public before we had decided upon the method whereby we shall achieve our goal. To-day we present our aim and our method to the Bohemian public.

    In the first place, we are concerned with self-education, which we seek to accomplish by research and by lectures which are sometimes delivered by members, and sometimes by specialists in those matters which we are interested in.

    Furthermore, we consider a hearty spiritual union among Bohemians as important, and this is made possible for us by Slavie, the women's study club, which has aims similar to those of our club, Snaha.

    This educational work is to prepare us actively to assist our brothers and sisters in their work in the Bohemian social life of Chicago.

    2

    Being women, we are especially interested in the youth, which requires so much care and effective love, and we will cheerfully assist at all times in questions concerning youth.

    Finally, by inserting brief reviews of Bohemian life in the English newspapers, we hope to acquaint the general public with the best characteristics of our people.

    Progress is our goal, truth is our method.

    The meetings, which will be of interest to the general public, will be announced in the daily papers.

    For the Snaha Women's Club,

    Klara Kvaus, president

    Alice G. Masaryk, secretary

    Address: A. G. Masaryk, 4638 Ashland Avenue.

    P.2--A year ago several of us, Bohemian professional women, formed a group for the purpose of self-education in important matters of the day. We dared not appear before the public ...

    Bohemian
    III B 2, II B 2 g, I B 3 b, II A 1, III A, I A 3, I C, IV
  • Denní Hlasatel -- December 29, 1910
    New Bohemian Books

    P.1, Col.6--The manager of the public library, Mr. H. E. Legler, informed us yesterday, that at the meeting of the Library-Board, held in the past week, it was decided to purchase a large quantity of new Bohemian books which were recommended to the Board. The Bohemian members of the Board, Mr. J. Toman, some time ago requested several individuals to furnish him with a list of recommended Bohemian books which could be purchased for the public library. This new list, together with the corrected old list, he turned over to the Librarian, Mr. Legler, who wishing to be fair to everybody, recommended at the meeting of the board, the purchase of the listed Bohemian books and to enrich the Bohemian branch with them. The Board accepted the recommendation with the exception of the Otto Encyclopedia which was eliminated from the list temporarily. Nevertheless the library will be enriched with the newest Bohemian works and these in turn will increase the attendance at the Bohemian branch of the Public Library. We regret to add, that the librarian of this branch is forced to continually protest against the bad behavior of some of the youth frequenting the library. It would certainly be in the interest of Bohemians if the parents were to take some prompt actions in the matter.

    P.1, Col.6--The manager of the public library, Mr. H. E. Legler, informed us yesterday, that at the meeting of the Library-Board, held in the past week, it was decided to ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 a, I B 3 b, IV
  • Denní Hlasatel -- August 05, 1911
    A Case of Patricide

    The extensive Czech community, which in the past few years has boomed west of Lawndale Avenue in the neighborhood of Twenty-sixth Street, and which seemed to be the seat of peace and satisfaction, was roused from its customary quiet by the report that in its midst, on Hamlin Avenue, a murder had been committed. Mr. Joseph Vacek, a retired carpenter contractor, was found shot to death in his room, at home, at 2629 South Hamlin Avenue. The killers fastened a note upon their victim's breast, which informed Mrs. Vacek that her husband had hired the murderers to kill her; this, however, failed and he refused to pay a promised reward of $500. For that reason they killed him. The police, however, did not 2allow themselves to be misled, and began an energetic investigation. They turned their attention first of all to the Vaceks' seventeen year old son Joseph; the police were most suspicious of him and they were really on the right track. Late last night the youth confessed to Police Lieutenant Ptacek, of the Lawndale Police Station, that he was the murderer of his own father. However, even in his confession he showed hate for his father and has beclouded his memory by insisting that his father wanted to force him to shoot his mother.....

    The extensive Czech community, which in the past few years has boomed west of Lawndale Avenue in the neighborhood of Twenty-sixth Street, and which seemed to be the seat of ...

    Bohemian
    II E 2, I B 3 b, III A
  • Denní Hlasatel -- August 06, 1911
    Patricide Held to the Grand Jury

    An inquest was held yesterday at the Lawndale Police Station over the corpse of fifty-four year old carpenter contractor Joseph Vacek, of 2919 South Hamlin Avenue, who was shot to death the day before yesterday by his sixteen year old son Joseph Vacek Jr., who, according to witnesses, was his favorite son.

    It is a terrible tragedy and the son, although he wept and complained when taken into custody by the police, probably does not realize what a terrible deed he has committed; indeed, according to all indications, it seems to us that his mind is not in perfect order.......

    Upon the advice of counsel, the patricide Joseph Vacek Jr., declined to testify at the inquest......

    After the hearing, the coroner's jury bound the youth over to the Grand Jury, without bail, and he was taken to the County Jail......

    An inquest was held yesterday at the Lawndale Police Station over the corpse of fifty-four year old carpenter contractor Joseph Vacek, of 2919 South Hamlin Avenue, who was shot to ...

    Bohemian
    II E 2, I B 3 b
  • Denní Hlasatel -- August 24, 1911
    Report of the Meeting of the United Czech Liberal Schools of Chicago Held on Sunday, August 20, 1911

    After the meeting was called to order by the president Mr. K. Kopecky and the minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved, a communication from the gymnastic society "Cechie" was read, in which the society applied for membership and chose as its delegate Mr. F. Metz. This gentleman, however, represents another body; therefore, he was notified to resign as delegate from one of the organizations because in accordance with the by-laws, a delegate can not represent two organizations at one time. An application for membership was received from "Vlasta" lodge No. 122 and this body chose as their representative Mrs. Marie Husak.

    2

    The Patronage of the Czesko-Americky Svobodomyslny Skoly (Bohemian-American Liberal [Freethought]School), on Eighteenth Street, elected Mr. Joseph Budil as its delegate. The Patronage of the school in Hanson Park and the Patronage of the "Jan Neruda" School requested the members to attend their picnics. The officers of the United Schools will attend as numerously as possible.

    The Patronage of the "Karel Havlicek" School recommended Miss Zdenka Koler as its teacher for the coming year. The matter was taken under consideration and because she has been teaching satisfactorily for a number of years, the request of that Patronage was granted.

    3

    Mrs. Kubalek tendered her resignation from her teaching position and the sub-committee will provide a new teacher to fill the position.

    Committee Reports: It was left to the Picnic Committee and Mrs. Hrych to make arrangements for the use of the Pilsen Park on some Saturday before the end of the school term.

    The School Committee reported that before the school year begins it will be necessary to secure a large number of second readers. The purchase of these books was approved. The committee nominated Mrs. Weiner as teacher at the Bunker Street School. Two remaining positions were advertised and applications received from nine persons. The best qualified of these were Mr. J. Rezabek, 4a former student at Prague University, who was nominated to teach on Saturday and Sunday in the Town of Lake School; the other was Mr. Bretislav Jonas, who studied at the Czech Technical School in Prague; he was selected to teach on Sunday mornings in the Irving Park School and Sunday afternoons at the Frant. Palacky School. Following this, the committee's report in regard to changes in the constitution was read, but because of insufficient time remaining and in order to consider the proposal thoroughly, the matter was postponed to a future day. A special meeting will be called for that purpose.

    A member of the Auditing Committee reported that it was impossible to examine 5the manager's books, because one member of the committee is sick and another has left the state permanently. Mr. Hofrieter was appointed to take the place of the latter member.

    For the good of the organization, the question of greater agitation in favor of the periodical Svobodna Skola (Free School) so that it might be more widely read in all circles of our people was discussed. To further the purpose it was proposed that a letter be sent to all liberal-minded [freethought] organizations urging them to order at least one subscription for each of their organizations and in that way arouse interest in reading in our social circles. In addition, each delegate will receive at the November meeting several copies for free distribution.

    Because the needs of our liberal schools and their management continue to 6increase, it is necessary to obtain the means for their upkeep, for that reason at the next meeting there will be a discussion about arranging some kind of celebration for the benefit of that purpose. If we are able to become inspired for Czech schools in the old country, where they are so indifferently dealt with by the unfriendly Austrian government, it does not mean that we should forget entirely the conditions, in which we live from day to day and which should not be unfamiliar to us.

    How much good could be accomplished for our children if our Czech Liberal Societies, in addition to the insignificant contribution, remembered at least once a year during the arrangement of some entertainment that there are hundreds and hundreds of Czech parents here who would be glad if their children could be 7educated in their mother tongue, in addition to English. Under existing conditions it is not strange that foreigners often know more about us than our own children.

    How much interest is being shown on all sides for Czech schools is best proven by the enrollment in the most recently opened school in Crawford, where more than one hundred children applied. There could be many more such schools among us if financial means permitted. The officers of our societies should remember that if they wish to maintain Czech societies for any length of time, it is necessary that love for parents and all things Czech, that is, toward Czech societies also, must be cultivated from earliest childhood and the best means of doing this are the Czech schools, because the parents themselves, as a result of the fierce struggle for existence, cannot give the children the proper attention.

    Bohuslav Linka,

    Correspondent.

    After the meeting was called to order by the president Mr. K. Kopecky and the minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved, a communication from the gymnastic society ...

    Bohemian
    II B 2 f, II B 2 d 2, III B 2, I B 3 b, I B 3 c, III C, I C