The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • The Albanian Journal -- January 02, 1922
    The Albanian College for Albania Next Summer.

    Methodist Episcopal Church extends helping hand to Shkipetars (Albanians) in educational endeavor.

    PROF. JONES PRAISES ALBANIANS.

    p. 1.- The Albanian government has appealed to the Methodist Episcopal Church of America to undertake the establishment of an American college in Albania. Bishop Blake answered the call of Albania and sent to that country Prof. Elmer E. Jones, director of the School of Education of North-western University of Evanston, to investigate educational conditions and future possibilities.

    Prof. Jones spent three months in Albania last summer visiting all the important cities and towns and studying the archaic characteristics and the 2national customs of the Albanian people. He returned to Evanston a few weeks ago and in his extensive report to the Board of Foreign Missions of the Methodist Episcopal Church of America strongly recommends the establishment of the American college in Albania.

    "The Albanians are eager for education," says Prof. Jones, "and anything American is cherished by them. I was royally welcomed by them everywhere, and the people showed great appreciation of my interest in their educational welfare. Officers of the government and mayors of various towns came out many miles to meet me and escort me to their respective towns. The people swarmed around me, and I was bored with kindness shown me. The hospitality of the Shkipetars, as the Albanians call themselves, is beyond comparison.

    "I sat at banquets with them from early evening till midnight almost everyday and I had a very pleasant time with them.

    3

    "While in Tirana I had daily conferences with the leaders of the government. They were enthusiastic at my proposition and promised me every possible assistance to make the American college a success. The Albanian government is willing to offer suitable buildings for the college and will place at our disposal large tracts of land for agricultural experimental purposes such as we may need. Albania is an undeveloped country but with very rich resources. The land in the plains is very productive and the mountains provide excellent pasture for the sheep and goats. Every family in the country keeps a certain number of sheep and goats, and there is a possibility for the development of the wool industry.

    "The enthusiasm of the Albanian children amazed me when I visited them in their schools. They amused me with their beautiful songs which they sang everywhere I went. But the condition of the schools in many towns is appalling and books are scarce. It seems to me as though Albania is clamoring for education with outstretched hands toward America, and I have promised 4to the Albanians American assistance in their educational development.

    "When the Albanian boys hear that we have a college at Valona they will climb up the mountains and come to it. Education has been utterly neglected in Albania in the past on account of the political animosity that has been prevalent in the Balkans, and Albanians who sought education were compelled to study foreign languages because their own language was prohibited by the Ottoman government, which ruled the country for four centuries, and anathematized by the Greek Orthodox Church. Notwithstanding the Turkish government, the Greek clergy was a dominant authority in the political affairs of Albania. Fortunately, both Turkey and Greece lost their political game in Albania, because since 1912 political authority is in the hands of the Albanians themselves who have proved their ability to run the government.

    "The Christian Albanians just lately severed their allegiance to the Greek Church and declared the Albanian Church independent."

    Methodist Episcopal Church extends helping hand to Shkipetars (Albanians) in educational endeavor. PROF. JONES PRAISES ALBANIANS. p. 1.- The Albanian government has appealed to the Methodist Episcopal Church of America ...

    Albanian
    I A 1 a, III C, III H
  • The Albanian Journal -- December 06, 1922
    The Albania's Independence Celebrated in Chicago.

    Prof. Elmer E. Jones tells Albanians of Educational Needs and Future Development of Shkiperia (Albania).

    MORE SCHOOLS FOR THE COUNTRY

    p. 1.- It was a glorious time when the natives of Albania now residing in Chicago, Argo, Ill., and Milwaukee, Wis., heard Prof. Elmer E. Jones, director of the School of Education of the Northwestern University of Evanston, Illinois, relate to them about his trip to Albania.

    The Albanians assembled to celebrate the Tenth Anniversary of the Independence of Albania, and to express their loyalty to the American flag for the privilege they enjoy under it in shaping the destiny of their country. The Albanians believe that while the races of mankind are represented by their own distinct languages, the nations and governments of the world are symbolized 2by the flags. The Albanian flag is highly esteemed by the Albanians, and at all patriotic meetings the flag of Albania and The Stars and Stripes lend their grandeur to the occasion.

    A committee had been appointed to invite Prof. Jones who had been on a trip to Albania recently for the purpose of investigating the educational needs of that country. Dr. Francis La Piana presided at the meeting.

    Prof. Jones was greeted by the Albanians as the first American who went to see what Albania is like and brought a complete report of the present conditions and future possibilities of the Balkan countries. During his lecture he brought Albania to Chicago for the Albanians who listened attentively to his experiences in going from town to town on mule's back, by carriage and automobile; how the people in Albania welcomed him and the hospitality shown him during his trip through the land of the Shkipetars (Albanians). The possibilities regarding the education of their countrymen and the development of the natural resources made the audience see the realization of the Albanian national aspirations.

    3

    Prof Jones spoke for two hours. He related how his friends in Evanston advised him to carry a gun with him because they thought Albania was a lawless country full of bandits, but since he was going for a peaceful purpose he decided not to carry the gun and that he felt perfectly safe without it among the supposed bandits. He spoke of Albania as a law-abiding country with an effective government, but greatly in need of educational facilities. He commented on the eagerness of the people for learning and their interest in the establishment of schools.

    Prof. Elmer E. Jones tells Albanians of Educational Needs and Future Development of Shkiperia (Albania). MORE SCHOOLS FOR THE COUNTRY p. 1.- It was a glorious time when the natives ...

    Albanian
    III H, I A 1 a
  • The Albanian Journal -- April 10, 1923
    (No headline)

    Albanian's tobacco monopoly, recently held by the British, has not been extended and is open to American interests. American business men will sail from New York, June 2nd, with Professor Elmer E. Jones and a group of Albanians, for a tour of Albania.

    Albanian's tobacco monopoly, recently held by the British, has not been extended and is open to American interests. American business men will sail from New York, June 2nd, with Professor ...

    Albanian
    I C, III H, I A 1 a
  • The Albanian Messenger -- June 16, 1934
    The Talent of the Albanian Race

    The talent and intellectual achievement of the Albanian race are always to be praised, because they not only honor the talented person and his parents; they honor all Albanians.

    Young Miss Kristina Nikolla, daughter of Pando and Urani Nikolla of Pogradeci, who has been taking violin lessons for a short time from the famous German professor, Nicholas Frazen, revealed extraordinary talent and ability in a program in which she participated at Professor Frazen's studio. She played Beethoven's "Minuet in G," and made a good impression for one of her age. In addition, Kristina took part in a concert and dramatic program presented by the Voisava Society, an organization of Chicago Albanian women, in which she played a violin solo before a large gathering of Albanians. She was enthusiastically applauded.

    The parents of this girl are to be praised, because the duty of bringing up and 2educating the children falls on the parents, who should do everything in their power to encourage the children in their studies and in anything else that contributes to the welfare of the child. In addition, the parents should urge their children to learn the Albanian language, if they wish to preserve the traditions of their forefathers.

    The talent and intellectual achievement of the Albanian race are always to be praised, because they not only honor the talented person and his parents; they honor all Albanians. Young ...

    Albanian
    II B 1 a, II B 1 c 1, I B 3 b, I A 1 a