The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Jewish Advance -- September 20, 1878
    (No headline)

    The speculation in Yomin Noroim (high holidays) piety is at high par. Would be pious men who have not the will to work in unison with any religious organization, who have not the ability to act as leaders, nor the necessary social qualifications to comply with the rules and regulations of an established Congregation, put themselves forward as organizers by this time of the year (High Holidays). They rent halls, make minyanim for the ensuing feasts, and find fools enough to follow them - noncomformists like themselves.

    One is ambitious to play the president; another one is satisfied with an office of minor importance. Thus a clique is formed, a hall rented, religious devotion made a trade of to the detriment of the established congregations on whom the whole burden of our religious affairs lies the whole year 'round, and on whom the blame falls for everything that is wrong.

    The speculation in Yomin Noroim (high holidays) piety is at high par. Would be pious men who have not the will to work in unison with any religious organization, who ...

    Jewish
    III B 3 b, I C
  • Svornost -- July 07, 1879
    John Hus Celebration

    The active Telocvicne Jednota Sokol (Sokol Gymnastic Union) has celebrated this year, as it always does, the memory of our never-to-be-forgotten leader, who for his insistence on truth and freedom of thought died far away from his native land in the flames of a charnel-house fire.

    The celebration consisted of two sessions, one in the afternoon and one in the evening. At the evening session Tyls's dramatic poem "Jan Hus" was presented by amateur actors. The afternoon session began with a concert by J. Novak's well-known orchestra; this was followed by "Tyrol," sung by the Choral Society. With the assistance of orchestra and singers Mr. Vacl Zajicek gave a monologue entitled "Delnik Boz Prace" (A Workman without Work), which was a great success. The timely poem "Prace" (Work), read by Mr. F. Stetka, was also well received. The celebration as a whole as well as the several productions which it comprised was entirely satisfactory to all those who attended.

    The active Telocvicne Jednota Sokol (Sokol Gymnastic Union) has celebrated this year, as it always does, the memory of our never-to-be-forgotten leader, who for his insistence on truth and freedom ...

    Bohemian
    III B 3 a, III B 3 b, II B 1 c 1, II B 1 a, II B 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- December 12, 1879
    Christmas Presents

    The Johanna lodge distributed Christmas presents yesterday in the basement of the Sinai Synagogue, 21st Street and Indiana Avenue. Presents were given to sixty-six boys and thirty-five girls. The gifts consisted of nice warm wearing apparel. Every boy received a pair of pants, coat and vest, two suits of underwear, two pair of stockings, boots or shoes, hat, necktie, suspenders, shawl, and gloves. Each girl was presented with a raincoat, hat, underwear, shoes, gloves, and so forth.

    The benevolently inclined ladies of the lodge obtained the money by arranging a concert and apparently donated additional funds of their own--judging from the quality of the presents.

    Only a comparatively small number of children were present. As most of their parents had seen better days, and as the Johanna lodge did not want 2the little ones to know that they were objects of charity, the presents were sent to the various homes.

    The children who came to the hall were given candy, nuts, cookies, and so forth.

    The ladies in charge of gift distribution prefer to remain anonymous.

    The old proverb applies here, "Blessed be the Giver".

    The Johanna lodge distributed Christmas presents yesterday in the basement of the Sinai Synagogue, 21st Street and Indiana Avenue. Presents were given to sixty-six boys and thirty-five girls. The gifts ...

    German
    II D 10, III B 3 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- December 13, 1879
    Appeal to Our German Women

    The glorious Christmas festival for our children draws ever nearer. What longing is awakened in young minds when we mention Christmas!

    Our memories of a happy childhood are the outstanding features of our declining years, and Christmas, above all, is indelibly impressed on our minds. How many poor children come to realize their abject poverty, when the world in general is merry and joyful, while the destitute are forgotten! In order to reach those children over whom dire want holds sway, and among whom the joys of Christmas are unknown, the Ladies' Aid of the German Society has decided to provide a number of children with warm clothing again this year and, incidentally, to arrange a festival for them.

    The concert, which had been arranged to provide funds for the purpose, unfortunately did not produce enough money to pay for the clothing which we intended to distribute, and therefore the ladies of the German Society found it 2necessary to appeal to benevolently inclined Germans to help complete the work.

    Donations--small or large--are always appreciated. The Ladies' Aid Society decided not to make a general collection, but to appeal to those benevolently inclined people who would gladly provide the needed funds, so that poor children also may have a Merry Christmas.

    The following committee members will gladly receive your contributions: North Side: Mrs. Claussenius, 149 Cass Street; Mrs. Molter, 484 Dearborn Avenue; Mrs. Ebener, 401 Larrabee Street.

    West Side: Mrs. Bluthardt, 43 South Peoria Street; Mrs. Rapp, 217 West Madison Street; Mrs. Buehler, North Avenue and Robey Street.

    South Side: Mrs. Clara Berger, 431 Prairie Avenue; Mrs. Blumenschein, 328 Cottage Grove Avenue; Mrs. Marie Werkmeister, 129 Archer Avenue.

    The glorious Christmas festival for our children draws ever nearer. What longing is awakened in young minds when we mention Christmas! Our memories of a happy childhood are the outstanding ...

    German
    II D 10, III B 3 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- December 19, 1879
    Christmas Presents for German Orphans

    Christmas gifts will be distributed at Uhlich's Orphanage on Christmas Day. This simple statement may suffice to induce our good-natured Germans to act in behalf of the poor children who have no loving parents to arrange a pleasant festival.

    Uhlich's Orphanage takes care of sixty-four children at present--youngsters who have the same longings at Christmas time as the offsprings of a wealthier class, or the more fortunately situated children who bask in the love of their parents.

    We appeal to the hundreds of well-to-do German families in our city to think of these poor orphans. Give just a little, your own children will never miss it, and you will earn sincere gratitude. Give what you can spare, clothing, toys, cake, candy or food--everything is welcome.

    2

    Presents will be accepted at the following convenient locations:

    At the Orphanage, corner Burlington Street and Center Avenue; in the basement of St. Paul's Church, southwest corner of LaSalle and Ohio Streets; at Charles Emmerich and Company, 285-287 Madison Street, and at S. Bauer and Company, 191 Lake Street.

    Christmas gifts will be distributed at Uhlich's Orphanage on Christmas Day. This simple statement may suffice to induce our good-natured Germans to act in behalf of the poor children who ...

    German
    II D 10, III B 3 b, II D 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- December 27, 1879
    Christmas Presents at Uhlich's Orphanage

    Christmas presents were distributed yesterday afternoon at Uhlich's Orphanage, located at the corner of Burlington and Center Streets. Many members of Chicago's Lutheran parishes were present. In connection therewith let it be said, that the appeal of the asylum's executive board brought generous response from the Germans. Donors were very liberal, and so many presents were received that many were saved for another occasion.

    Members of the board, and several ladies, decorated the Christmas tree, which was mounted in the sewing room. The tree was provided by Miss Bauer, the Kindergarten teacher.

    The festivities started at 4 P. M. and several hundred people were present. The orphans, twenty-one girls and forty boys, marched from the schoolroom into the festival room, surrounded the tree and sang, "Vom Himmel Hoch Da Komm Ich Her". Pastor Hartmann preached an inspiring sermon and ended with a prayer.

    2

    Then the children sang "Ein Koenig Kommt Aus Zion," at the conclusion of which Reverend Gottlieb Blankenhahn, in charge of the Orphanage, had the children recite the prophesies of the Bible up to the time of Christ's birth.

    The tree was lit while the children sang "Welche Morgenroethe Wallet Himmelab," and, after a few more words were said about the age-old festival, the children formed into ranks again and marched and sang.

    Then the presents were distributed. At first a bag of candy and nuts, finally a toy commensurate with the child's age. The children played until 9 P. M. and then went to bed. We may well assume that all had pleasant dreams, as all departed in a very happy mood.

    Finally Reverend Mr. Hartmann addressed the visitors. The festival was undoubtedly one of the most outstanding affairs of its kind we have witnessed this year.

    Christmas presents were distributed yesterday afternoon at Uhlich's Orphanage, located at the corner of Burlington and Center Streets. Many members of Chicago's Lutheran parishes were present. In connection therewith let ...

    German
    III B 3 b, II D 4, III C, I B 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- December 31, 1879
    Christmas Distribution of Presents by the Ladies' Aid

    The Ladies' Aid, a branch of the German Society, arranged a festival yesterday afternoon at Brand's Hall, located at the corner of Clark and Erie Streets, for the benefit of poor children. Many of our German women participated and a large number of presents were received. The interest manifested by the visitors, and the liberal attitude of our businessmen, deserve commendation. The association received more gifts than could be distributed yesterday. The success is attributable in a large measure to the endeavors of the committee headed by Mrs. Marie Werkmeister. This applies to the presentation of the gifts as well as the afternoon's entertainment.

    Although only 103 children had been listed, the number increased to 140 by the time the distribution was in progress. Many women, particularly the mothers of the little tots, were present. A Christmas tree was 2mounted on the stage and was surrounded by cardboard figures representing Biblical subjects. These were the deft handiwork of the ladies forming the committee. The children tried on the clothes, given as a present, in an adjoining room before the commencement of the festivities.

    Oscar Schmoll played an introductory number on the piano, whereupon the children marched through the hall to the stage and there grouped themselves into a half circle. All of them carried little baskets containing their presents: a complete outfit of clothing for the boys as well as for the girls. Miss Blanca Pick recited a poem, a composition by Mrs. Werkmeister, and, while most of the children were too young to understand it, the work proved very impressive to the older contingent.

    Mrs. Clara Huck sang "Herz Aller Liebstes Schatzerl Du" and Oscar Schmoll played the piano accompaniment. Because of her splendid voice and good training, Mrs. Huck's rendition proved a musical treat indeed.

    3

    Miss Krause and Miss Trautwein then played several appealing piano selections.

    After a short intermission, Miss Wangemann sang. She was followed by Miss Pick, who recited the tragic poem "Mona's Waters". The next number on the program was "Waer Ich Ein Veilchen Auf Der Au," sung by Mrs. Huck, who followed with an encore, "I Und Mei Bua".

    Next, several piano pieces were played by Oscar Schmoll, and the children and young ladies danced to the music. Then followed the raffling of a bouquet of waxflowers, donated for the occasion by Miss Trautwein. Mrs. Peipers, treasurer, who was in charge of this part of the program, sold 107 chance tickets at twenty-five cents each; number fifty was the lucky winner.

    Finally Miss Wangemann sang another number, dancing continued, and the festival came to a close at half past seven in the evening.

    The members of the Ladies' Aid hereby express their gratitude to all who 4participated, particularly the numerous donors.

    The Ladies' Aid, a branch of the German Society, arranged a festival yesterday afternoon at Brand's Hall, located at the corner of Clark and Erie Streets, for the benefit of ...

    German
    II B 1 c 3, III B 3 b, II D 10
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 07, 1880
    The Ladies' Aid of the German Society

    The members of the executive committee of the Ladies' Aid Society, a branch of the German Society, passed the following resolution yesterday:

    "The Ladies' Aid Society of the German Society hereby expresses its gratitude to all who gave gifts or otherwise helped to provide a Christmas festival for the poor children. The ladies particularly thank Mr. Brand for his courtesy in having provided free use of his hall, and are very grateful to the German press which gave publicity to the event in so liberal a manner, thus helping considerably in making the affair a success. Furthermore, we thank the various businessmen for the presents they contributed and their friendly interest; also the individuals whose donations enabled the Society to have a plentiful supply of everything for the occasion. The ladies also thank Mr. Bauer, who furnished a piano for the occasion, as well as Mrs. Huck, Mrs. Thorwarth, Miss Pick, and Mr. Schmoll, whose combined efforts made a success of the affair. In fact, we thank all who collaborated with us to make the affair a success.

    "An accounting will be submitted next Wednesday."

    The members of the executive committee of the Ladies' Aid Society, a branch of the German Society, passed the following resolution yesterday: "The Ladies' Aid Society of the German Society ...

    German
    II D 10, III B 3 b
  • Svornost -- July 07, 1880
    Jan Huss Memorial

    The celebration last night in the "Tel. Jed Sokol" (Gymnastic Union Sokol) hall, in commemoration of the burning at the stake, of Master Jan Hus, was carried out in a dignified manner. A very fine portrait of our great defender of free thought and free speech, banked by flowers and the Colors of the Tel. Jed. Sokol (Gymnastic Union Sokol) was displayed upon the stage. Plainly to be sure, but nevertheless suitably decorated, it was somewhat significant of the noblemindedness of our women's organizations.

    Shortly after 8 o'clock, Mr. J. Novak arrived with his well-liked musicians ensemble and cheerfully and willingly rendered two praiseworthy compositions, before the speaker, Mr. Fr. B. Zdrubek, took his place. The ceremonial speech befitting the occasion was received with fervent gratitude. Toward the end of the speech three cheers were given for the memory of Jan Huss, three cheers to the success of Tel. Jed. Sokol were also given. After this the band again played and after receiving much praise, which was demonstrated by means of the general applause given, the audience left for their homes.

    2

    We cannot refrain from saying, with warranted bitterness, that the cancer of disinterest is beginning to eat into the enthusiasm and life of our community, not only in political affairs, but on occasions, where it should appear as one unanimous body to show that it continues to foster warm sentiments for all things that tend toward the consecration of the spirit of free thought. There was a comparatively small audience present at yesterday's ceremonies in memoriam of Jan Huss.

    The celebration last night in the "Tel. Jed Sokol" (Gymnastic Union Sokol) hall, in commemoration of the burning at the stake, of Master Jan Hus, was carried out in a ...

    Bohemian
    III B 3 a, III B 3 b, II B 3, IV
  • The Occident -- September 10, 1880
    The Holiday's Services

    It is with gratification that we can record the fact that Rash Hashana has been served in all sections of our City. Notable is it also that many Isrealitish sojourners have come to Chicago to celebrate the New Year. Nearly all our places of worship realized handsome encouragement in Pew rents and by reason of the beginning of the holiday on a Sunday evening with a delightful day caused the Temples and synagogues to be filled to repletion. Quite a number of private minyans ( religious quorums ) were held throughout the city, most of whom adhere to the strict Orthodox ritual. At the Sinai Temple Rev. E. G. Hirsch, late of Louisville, officiated delivering English and German Sermons, to which we may refer in our next issue.

    It is with gratification that we can record the fact that Rash Hashana has been served in all sections of our City. Notable is it also that many Isrealitish sojourners ...

    Jewish
    III B 3 b