The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 21, 1885
    The German Old People's Home

    The dedication of this Home was cause for rejoicing by the German population. After a speech by Mayor Harrison, Dr. Hirsch stepped on the platform and delivered in German an excellent address: "This is an honor day for the Germans of Chicago.

    The German's home is like an anchor. Storms and high waters may rage but it holds fast to its anchor. Thus, this House becomes a home for the veterans in the battle with life. Like loving relatives we shall receive them here, to conclude the sunset of their lives in peace.

    The heart of the German-American is capable of still greater benevolence. Neither Church nor sect play any special part. Therefore, it is limitless... This Home is a monument to German womanhood. They have erected a haven to receive what is left, when life has ceased to maim and to crush.

    The dedication of this Home was cause for rejoicing by the German population. After a speech by Mayor Harrison, Dr. Hirsch stepped on the platform and delivered in German an ...

    German
    II D 5, I C, II B 1 c 3, III A, III C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 14, 1886
    Depot Altenheim

    Mr. A. C. Hesing, President of the Old People's Home, yesterday handed Mr. Weege, the General Director of the Wisconsin Central Railroad, a petition of the Directors to open a depot near the Old People's Home. Mr. Hesing left with the promise that a depot within one hundred feet of Madison Street will be erected and that it shall carry the name "Altenheim". He also received the promise that the territory East of Altenheim Boulevard will not be built on, but that it will be laid out and planted, so that in the summer small picnics may be held there.

    Mr. A. C. Hesing, President of the Old People's Home, yesterday handed Mr. Weege, the General Director of the Wisconsin Central Railroad, a petition of the Directors to open a ...

    German
    II D 5, IV
  • Zgoda -- January 26, 1887
    Slander

    There are many Americans who give our forefathers credit for their splendid support of the Catholic religion and their undying love for their native land.

    Not long ago something was said in regard to the above mentioned which caused hard feelings and misunderstanding among Polish people; we feel that it should be overlooked.

    American citizens attending the Polish National Alliance convention began collecting donations to support and maintain the academy and convent of the Ursulan Sisters. Donations were given good-heartedly.

    During a church mission in a small town near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a Polish Catholic priest, Father Koluszewski of Cleveland, ascended the pulpit and denounced sternly the donations given to support the "n Home."

    2

    "Who gave them permission," said the Reverend Father to the congregation, "to take care of the collections for the Ursulans? Do not believe them; they are liars, these Ursulans; they are a suspicious group of ladies. In the old country the devil sent women to do his bidding where he himself had failed."

    I will not say anything that you can hold against me but I will add this - that the reason for the sudden anger of Reverend Father Koluszewski against the Ursulans is that the Polish National Alliance of America is taking care of the donations for the Ursulans and is being fully supported by its 3,000 members and by different societies and Catholic institutions.

    Reverend Father Koluszewski is himself working against the Polish National Alliance; he cannot understand how an organization as big as the P. N. A. can undertake so great a responsibility and still have so many Roman Catholic priests striving for an opportunity to join it.

    Reverend Koluszewski's speech from the pulpit only caused the people to 3leave in great anger; it caused ill feeling among the P. N. A. members because they were willing to contribute to the support of poor Ursulan Sisters' Convent.

    Another priest said: "As a priest, I am humiliated at the sudden outburst of Reverend Father Koluszerski; as a Pole, I cannot find words to apoligize for his behavior. I know that from our native country the poorest class of people crossed the ocean in search of a country where they could be taken care of in their old age, as for example, the Home of the Ursulan Sisters. This institution is also striving to save our children from the shame put upon their souls because of the lack of education. They are working to teach our Polish children the success and pleasures of life received from having a good education and from the teachings of the Catholic religion.

    It also shows in old records that the head of this institution, Superior Sister Morawska, donated her farm and all her money in her home town of Poland for the building of this home, Ursulan Sisters. This shows that any propaganda or slander said against these "Sisters" is only used as an obstruction against the Polish people in their effort to advance and their 4undying love for the Catholic religion.

    Almighty God will punish the trouble-maker who spoke so rudely about the Ursulan Sisters and their undying love for the Catholic religion.

    Dr. Rev. Father Kanonik.

    There are many Americans who give our forefathers credit for their splendid support of the Catholic religion and their undying love for their native land. Not long ago something was ...

    Polish
    III C, I A 2 c, III B 4, I K, III B 2, II D 5, I A 2 a
  • Der Westen -- May 22, 1887
    E. J. Lehmann's New Act of Kindness.

    Throughout the enormous establishment of "The Fair", department store owned by E. J. Lehmann and Company, an excellent spring exhibition has dazzled the eyes of every visitor. The store was gorgeously decorated with flowers and plants of every description, which were placed on sale, Wednesday, at a very much reduced price. The kind hearted, spirited E. J. Lehmann donated the sum derived from this sale to the "Altenheim" (Old People's Home) by sending to the Treasurer, Mr. Buhler, the identical money obtained for the purchases, the gift amounting to $426.73. Great appreciation was expressed to Mr. Lehmann by the Board of Directors of the "Altenheim" of which E. J. Lehmann is a member. Every German can be proud of a citizen ever ready to help where charity is needed.

    Throughout the enormous establishment of "The Fair", department store owned by E. J. Lehmann and Company, an excellent spring exhibition has dazzled the eyes of every visitor. The store was ...

    German
    II A 2, II D 5, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 08, 1887
    Joy of Life and Charitableness

    Chicago's German population is given an opportunity both to enjoy itself and be charitable, for tomorrow will mark the opening of the Festival Grove, connected with the Old People's home. Germans of other cities were unfavorably impressed by the fact that a rapidly growing city like Chicago, with a large German population, has hardly a place in the open where German-Americans can hold their festivals. The rent collected from the use of the Grove will benefit the Old People's Home.....

    Chicago's German population is given an opportunity both to enjoy itself and be charitable, for tomorrow will mark the opening of the Festival Grove, connected with the Old People's home. ...

    German
    II D 5, II B 1 c 3, III A
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 13, 1887
    A Great Surprise for the "Altenheim".

    The friendship between Carter H. Harrison and the Germans did not end with his retirement from public office, and no other nationality amongst the Chicagoans regretted the end of Mr. Carter's career as the German element did. But, that Mr. Harrison's friendship for the Germans outlived his public career was shown by his generous gift to the "Altenheim", made from the legacy of his young wife, who so unfortunately was taken by death in the prime of her life. The sum donated was $3,000. The management of the "Altenheim" and the Germans of Chicago greatly appreciate Mr. Harrison's gift. The check and the following letter were received by Mr. A. C. Hesing: "To the President and Directors of the "German Old People's Home". When the "Altenheim" was dedicated, my late beloved and I, through the kindness of the management, were enabled to assist in the pleasing ceremonies. She was touched by the courtesies then shown her, and deeply impressed by the scope of the noble charity; so much so, that she declared to me, she would some day make to the "Altenheim" a handsome donation. Summoned too early to her eternal home, she has been deprived of this pleasure 2and privilege. I wish to do now in her name, what she would have liked so much to have done herself. My wife died possessed of some funds, the gift of her father Marcus C. Stearns, Esquire. These funds I have determined to give in charity, in which determination I have the hearty concurrence of my wife's father. In furtherance of this object I herewith inclose to you my check for $3,000, with which I wish to endow a fund in perpetuity to be known in your institution and on its records as "The Margarette Stearns-Harrison Fund". The principal to be invested in good securities and annual interest only to be used. While Margarette lived she made my home happy and bright. If her fund shall make the "Altenheim" a happy and bright home for some of its unfortunate occupants, the loss I have suffered by her death will be deprived of a small part of its sting. Wishing you great success in the management of your noble institution I am very respectfully Your obedient servant, Carter H. Harrison.

    The friendship between Carter H. Harrison and the Germans did not end with his retirement from public office, and no other nationality amongst the Chicagoans regretted the end of Mr. ...

    German
    II D 5, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 12, 1887
    A Magnificent Festival.

    The charitably inclined Germans of Chicago celebrated a festival, yesterday, which will be remembered as the outstanding festival of the season. Friends of the Altenheim were triumphant over the great success which surpassed even the dreams of an optimist. But the English speaking people also took a great interest in this celebration, and it was not at all surprising to see many of that nationality on the picnic grounds of the Luisen grove. A signal given, late in the afternoon, summoned the guests to the speaker's platform where Henry Greenebaum was ready to give the festival address, in which he highly praised the institution's benefactor, A. C. Hesing.

    The charitably inclined Germans of Chicago celebrated a festival, yesterday, which will be remembered as the outstanding festival of the season. Friends of the Altenheim were triumphant over the great ...

    German
    II D 5, I C, IV, II B 1 c 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 23, 1888
    German Hospital

    "It is gratifying, indeed, to be able to report that things take their usual course in the German hospital. New patients are accepted continually, and others are dismissed as healed. The angel of death also appears occasionally and demands his victims. Since the latter part of April about 80 patients entered and 40 of them have been dismissed as healed. About 20 operations have been performed during this time, and some of them were very difficult, but all of them turned out very successfully.

    About 50 cases have been treated in the dispensary of the hospital. Dr. J. H. Hoelscher gives his personal attention to the dispensary daily from 10 to 12 o'clock during the forenoon, except on Sunday. Recently, a very sick patient bequeathed to this institution $8,000 and $2,000 to the Old Peoples Home, but the successful medical treatment restored his health again and this, of course, was the end of the princely gifts. Although we need the money very much, yet we are glad for the successful treatments, and we trust others will be induced to manifest their good will toward these institutions."

    "It is gratifying, indeed, to be able to report that things take their usual course in the German hospital. New patients are accepted continually, and others are dismissed as healed. ...

    German
    II D 3, II D 5
  • Abendpost -- January 08, 1890
    Festival for the Home of the Aged. (Altenheim - Fest)

    Northside Turn hall features the much spoken of Festival, and Mrs. Scherenberg prepared and excellent program. It is to be expected that the Chicago Germans manifest their interest and promote the welfare of the home, by their numerous attendance, and incidentally reward the committee of the ladies for their efforts. Concert commen cement is scheduled to be prompt at 8, followed by a festive dance (Ball).

    Northside Turn hall features the much spoken of Festival, and Mrs. Scherenberg prepared and excellent program. It is to be expected that the Chicago Germans manifest their interest and promote ...

    German
    II D 5, II B 1 c 3
  • Abendpost -- January 10, 1890
    Home for the Aged.

    The Altenheim Authorities held their monthly meeting yesterday (Altenheim Exekutivebehorde) at Niehoffs meeting hall; Chairman A. C. Hesing presiding. Mr. Kohler gave statistics concerning income and expenses. He also proclaimed that the improvement of driveways has been contemplated. Finally a vote of thanks was accorded to all who gave financial aid to this German institution.

    The Altenheim Authorities held their monthly meeting yesterday (Altenheim Exekutivebehorde) at Niehoffs meeting hall; Chairman A. C. Hesing presiding. Mr. Kohler gave statistics concerning income and expenses. He also proclaimed ...

    German
    II D 5