The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 23, 1892
    Twenty-Six New Members Added to St. Casimir Young Men's Club

    Twenty-six new members have been added to the ever growing St. Casimir Young Men's Club, according to an official announcement made at the quarterly meeting last week. During the past few months, the society has gained more recognition, patronage, and members, than in any preceding months. The spirit of the Polish Catholic groups is awakening and they are becoming more interested in Polish Catholic organizations.

    March 4 marked the anniversary of the St. Casimir. In memory of this patron of the society, a special religious ceremony was held for the members at St. Stanislaus Kostki's Church in the evening. Prayer, songs, and lectures, were a part of the rituals.

    2

    A Cultural Committee constantly plans programs of interest which enrich the members in traditional, historical, and literary knowledge of the Polish people.

    Every Polish Catholic young man past his sixteenth year can become a member of this organization. Entrance fee is two dollars, and regular monthly fees are twenty-five cents. Besides giving assistance in case of sickness, mishap, and death, the club offers many educational advantages to its members.

    Julius Szczepanski, president.

    Twenty-six new members have been added to the ever growing St. Casimir Young Men's Club, according to an official announcement made at the quarterly meeting last week. During the past ...

    Polish
    III E, II B 1 d, II D 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 15, 1893
    Louis Nettelhorst, the Esteemed Pioneer of Germanism, Died Suddenly and Unexpectedly.

    About 8:30 o'clock last night Mr. Louis Nettelhorst closed his eyes forever in his home, 46 Wisconsin Street. To his family and friends the catastrophe came suddenly and unexpectedly, for he had withheld from them his condition. Last Sunday, upon the urgent request of his family, he finally sought aid of medical science, but it was too late. Human skill could not save him any more.

    The physicians, Dr. P. H. Matthei, and Dr. H. Geiger diagnosed the case immediately as a shrinkage of the kidneys; however, they were unable to do anything else but to ease the sufferings. The disease started apparently two years ago when he was ill with influenza.

    The illness increased steadily, and may have been accelerated through the unceasing work of the patient. Nettelhorst possessed, as is well known, a marvelous energy for work. Next to his regular business responsibilities, he devoted his time to club activities, and he also took an active part in political affairs. As late as last Monday, when he already was in the grip of death, he came to his office to attend to his daily duties.

    2

    Nettelhorst was very highly esteemed by his fellow citizens. Frequently, posts of honor were offered to him, and on the day of his death, the Citizen's Council, which met in the Sherman House, intended to offer him a position of high honor and trust, i. e., that of city treasurer.

    One of his most highly esteemed traits was his frankness, and this, combined with his integrity and iron will, made him very influential in business, as well as in social life. Everybody knew that Nettelhorst's words could be trusted and depended upon.

    Nettelhorst was born on February 4, 1851, in Bremem, Germany. In 1870 he emigrated to Chicago, where with but a few interruptions he lived the rest of his life. At first he went into the insurance business, but later he took up general merchandising. In 1875 he became a bookkeeper at C. Emmerich & Co., and after twelve years of service he became a partner of the same firm.

    During all this time he was very active in gymnastics and social life. The Chicago Turngemeinde (Athletic Club) elected him in 1880 as its first speaker, and for twelve years he retained this honorable position. The choral society, Fidelia, made him its president in 1875, and its success was in a large measure due to his leadership.

    3

    He was a member of the Board of Directors of the Germania Men's Choir, and he also was an esteemed and beloved member of the Oriental Free Masons, the German Press Club, and the Men's Club of the Old People's Home.

    Nettelhorst was unusually successful as a member of the School Board, to which he belonged for six years, being its president for two years. Due to his energetic efforts, gymnastics were introduced in public schools, and the continuation of German instruction is, to a certain extent, also due to his activities. Last summer he resigned voluntarily from this position. In recognition of his services, the school located at Evanston Avenue and School Street was named after him.

    Repeatedly, Nettelhorst refused to run as candidate for congress. He was not seeking political honors. However, two years ago he was persuaded by Harrison to accept the candidacy for city treasurer, but he was defeated in connection with the party ticket...

    In 1873 Nettelhorst married Miss Betty Roegeneck. One daughter and two sons were born to them. They are now seventeen, sixteen and nine years old, respectively. This family loses in him a most devoted and loving provider; 4his firm a capable and energetic partner; the gymnastic and other clubs lose one of their most successful promoters, and the country loses one of its most unselfish and loyal patriots.

    About 8:30 o'clock last night Mr. Louis Nettelhorst closed his eyes forever in his home, 46 Wisconsin Street. To his family and friends the catastrophe came suddenly and unexpectedly, for ...

    German
    IV, II B 2 d 1, III B 2, II B 1 a, I A 1 b, II B 3, II D 1, II D 2, II D 5, I F 5
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- April 24, 1893
    The Pulaski Mutual Fire Insurance Company

    The Pulaski Society of America, which has been reorganized to form the Pulaski Mutual Fire Insurance Company, is extending its sphere of activity. It will provide fire insurance on homes, stores, stocks, furniture, etc.

    The reorganization committee consisted of Emil H. Bessa, A. Jendrzejek, A. J. Kowalski, Andrew Schultz, Joseph Schroeder, A. J. Kwasigroch, John Matz, John Kortas, Francis Matz, John Suwalski, John F. Smulski, Francis Wleklinski, and Jacob Jakubowski.

    The Company's offices are located at 163 W. Blackhawk Street.

    Its officers are Emil H. Bessa, president, A. J. Kwasigroch, secretary, and A. J. Kowalski, treasurer. Permanent directors will be elected on May 4.

    The Pulaski Society of America, which has been reorganized to form the Pulaski Mutual Fire Insurance Company, is extending its sphere of activity. It will provide fire insurance on homes, ...

    Polish
    II D 2, III B 2, II A 2, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- September 29, 1893
    Grand Opening of Pulaski Mutual Fire Insurance Company's New Offices

    The grand opening of the new offices of the Pulaski Mutual Fire Insurance Company, in A. J. Kwasigroch's newly erected building at the corner of Blackhawk Street and Holt Avenue, was held at five o'clock yesterday afternoon. The event is of considerable importance to this seventeen-year-old institution. It is a well-known fact that the activities of the Company have thus far been limited because of an inadequate charter and poor organization. Despite this, however, the institution managed to exist, serving at least a small circle of clients.....A reorganization plan was conceived and effected several months ago, as we reported at the time. The Pulaski Company was reincorporated and now has a right to engage in every type of fire insurance business, on a par with other companies. It was reincorporated under the name of "The Pulaski Mutual Fire Insurance Company". The institution has an operating capital of $60,000, while 2individual guarantees of members total about $180,000, giving it a backing of about $250,000.

    Every Pole can now safely insure his property at this Polish institution, which will undoubtedly grow to be one of major proportions if we support it to the fullest extent.

    In order to mark this progress in the Company's affairs, its offices were moved to new, adequately furnished quarters, which were formally opened yesterday afternoon. All of the directors and officers of the institution were present, namely, Bess, Schroeder, [W.] Jedrzejek, A. J. Kwasigroch, A. J. Kowalski, J. F. Smulski, [J.] Mucha, [J.] Czekala, Matz, and A. Schultz. The Reverend Vincent Barzynski and the editors of Dziennik Chicagoski, Wiara i Ojczyzna, Zgoda, and Gazeta Katolicka were present as special guests.

    3

    The directors explained the Company's state of affairs to the gathering, after which sandwiches and wine were served. There were many speeches and toasts. A. J. Kowalski, treasurer of the Company, spoke of the history of the organization, its trials, and struggles. Father Barzynski took the floor several times, with toasts to the Company's successful development. The editors also spoke, as did everyone else present. Toasts were raised to the oldest and most active officers of the Company, and, in conclusion, a collection netting $23.25 was taken up for the benefit of the Polish Welfare Society.

    In behalf of this paper, we wish the newly reorganized institution every possible success. Poles should support it, for it is a Polish enterprise. By supporting it, they will prove that the Poles are capable businessmen and think well of themselves.

    The grand opening of the new offices of the Pulaski Mutual Fire Insurance Company, in A. J. Kwasigroch's newly erected building at the corner of Blackhawk Street and Holt Avenue, ...

    Polish
    II D 2, II A 2, II D 10, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- August 28, 1894
    Convention of the Polish Roman Catholic Union (Editorial)

    The Polish Roman Catholic Union's convention was a success in every respect.

    It has proved that there is concord and unity in the organization, as was evident during the sessions, and that the Union's management is excellent. It also has proved that the Union's activities are not merely limited to paying death benefits but that they include the promotion of worthy ideals. The convention has proved the Union's lofty aims--religious, moral, social, and national.

    Proof of this is the good work done at the convention and the number of resolutions adopted.

    Let us enumerate them in brief:

    2

    In the first place, the convention has confirmed (in Czerwinski's address to the bishop)--before Bishop Horstmann and the American people--the Catholic and Polish character of the Polish Roman Catholic Union; it has also confirmed the civic stand of this organization and of all the Poles in this country.

    Furthermore, with dignity and without malice, and in the name of all Poles in America, the convention protested against the schism of the charlatan Kolaszewski and Chrostowski, and appealed to those who had gone astray to return to the fold.

    It has condemned dissension and all attempts to destroy national solidarity.

    It has condemned a malicious press, the object of which has been to sow the seeds of discord.

    It has recommended the Polish parochial school as the best school for our 3people, as an institution that teaches religion and Polish history.

    It has recommended harmony and co-operation among all organizations having a Polish and Catholic background.

    It has indicated that the Polish League of America is a patriotic organization not in opposition to the Polish Roman Catholic Union, and that it deserves our support.

    When the Unia Polska w Ameryce (Polish Union of America) extended its brotherly hand, the convention answered by extending both hands.

    Finally, the convention did not forget to accomplish something worthwhile, for it set aside funds to support a publication devoted to the Polish youth, the only one of its kind in the United States.

    This is the sum total of the work accomplished--the result of the convention 4of the Polish Roman Catholic Union of America.

    This work proves that the aim of the Polish Roman Catholic Union is to create harmony among the disorganized Poles in America, to promote constructive work in behalf of the community, and to foster religious and moral principles. This is proof that although the Polish Roman Catholic Union stands by its principles with dignity, it does not conspirate against anyone, sow hatred, or desire fratricidal fights. On the contrary, its desire is to heal all wounds. The convention should get credit for this. Honor to it.

    The Polish Roman Catholic Union's convention was a success in every respect. It has proved that there is concord and unity in the organization, as was evident during the sessions, ...

    Polish
    III B 4, II D 1, II D 2, III C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- September 04, 1894
    Fourth Convention of the Polish Roman Catholic Union under the Guidance of the Queen of the Polish Crown (Summary)

    According to the program of the convention, the delegates from societies belonging to this Union gathered today at 8 A.M. at Pulaski Hall. The societies represented were Saint Adalbert Society (delegates: W. Pijanowski, O. Grochowski, Ignace Morzynski, Joseph Napieralski); Knights of Saint Casimir Society (delegates: Francis Kaminski, J. F. Jackowski); Holy Name Society (delegates: Constant Gulcz, Vincent Jaworski); Saint Dominic Society (delegates: Joseph Herman, John Pacholski, John Rochowiak); Krakuses of Saint Gregory Society (delegate: B. L. Maciejewski); Saint Stanislaus Brotherhood (delegate: K. J. Drzycimski); and Saint Joseph Society (delegate: Anthony Polenz).

    2

    All told, there were fourteen delegates representing seven societies, plus the Union's administration personnel, consisting of ten members.

    At 9 A.M. the delegates attended church service at Saint Adalbert Church, where Reverend John Radziejewski delivered a sermon based on a passage from the Bible: "Blessed are the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy." [Mat. 5-7.]

    After the services, the delegates returned to Pulaski Hall, where, on a motion by Napieralski, Joseph Herman was made chairman of the convention. In a short address, the chairman expressed the hope that the session would be peaceful and declared that he would not allow the discussion of private matters, and that delegates violating this order would forfeit their right to vote.

    Subsequently, with the consent of the assembly, the chairman appointed J. M. Drzycimski secretary of the convention.

    3

    Thereupon the assembly went on to choose a committee on credentials consisting of W. Pijanowski, Francis Kaminski, and B. Maciejewski. Shortly before 10 A. M., Reverend D. Majer, pastor of a Polish parish in St. Paul, Minnesota, chaplain of the Unia Polska (Polish Union), and J. M. Rozan, secretary of the same organization, arrived at the hall. The delegates rose from their seats in honor of the guests.

    As soon as the credentials had been approved, O. Grochowski, general secretary of the Union, submitted a report of the societies that had not paid their dues. The report showed that only two societies had paid, and that the others were more or less back on their payments.

    On a motion by W. Pijanowski, it was decided that the delegates of delinquent societies should promise that these arrears would be paid or else lose their right to vote. This motion, seconded by B. L. Maciejewski, was carried.

    4

    It was found that the Saint Joseph Society had failed not only to pay its dues but also to provide its delegate, A. Polonez, with a credential. The delegate in question was present but could not participate in the discussions.

    Next in the order of the day was the selection of a Records Committee, for which the following were chosen: W. Pijanowski, K. Gulcz, and John Pacholski.

    On a motion by O. Grochowski, a committee of three--J. Napieralski, Stanislaus Budsbanowski, and John Radziejewski--was appointed to invite Reverend John Redziejewski to the afternoon session.

    The Motion Committee consisted of O. Grochowski, Ignace Morzynski, and Vincent Jaworski.

    Subsequently, J. Napieralski took up the question of the Sacred Heart of Mary Society, which had failed to pay three assessments and had with-drawn 5from membership,

    O, Grochowski, secretary of the Union, motioned that a special committee be sent to both societies--the Sacred Heart of Mary and the Saint Joseph--in order to find out what they intend to do.

    Then the chairman asked Reverend Majer to address the assembly.

    Reverend Majer delivered a beautiful address, in which he described the position of the Polish Roman Catholics in foreign countries. He said: "We should always love the mother country and our faith. These two should not be separated." He praised all organizations, and emphasized the good qualities of catholic organizations, to which all people should belong for their own protection in case of misfortune. He said that if we were well organized we would gain politically and could hold more public offices. The speaker mentioned Krzeminski, arrested in Russia, and expressed regret that we could not help him just because we were not well organized. The 6speaker concluded his address by wishing the Union success, in his name and in the name of Unia Polska. Reverend Majer's speech was received with enthusiasm.

    The next speaker was J. M. Rozan, secretary of Unia Polska. The speaker told the story of Unia Polska, of its birth and development. He emphasized the fact that Unia Polska had been founded on Catholic principles and for the good of our motherhood. He also spoke about conditions in his organization, and stated that despite the low assessments, Unia Polska pays a very high death benefit--$750.

    The session adjourned until 2 P.M.

    The afternoon session began at 2:30 P.M. Reverend John Radziejewski said a prayer, after which the credentials of A. Polonez, delegate of the Saint Joseph Society, were accepted.

    7

    J. Drzycimski, secretary of the convention, read the minutes of the morning session, and the chairman asked Reverend J. Radziejewski to speak to the delegates.

    Reverend Radziejewski accepted the invitation and proceeded to describe the condition of the organization. He talked about the importance of the convention, saying that it would decide the future of the Polish Roman Catholic Union under the Guidance of the Queen of the Polish Crown. He also said--humorously, of course--that two fishermen had come to this convention for the purpose of catching this organization in their nets. He referred to Reverend D. Majer, of St. Paul, Minnesota, and J. Rozan, of Buffalo, New York. Reverend Radziejewski described himself as a third fisherman anxious to get this organization in the net of the regular Polish Roman Catholic Union under the Guidance of the Sacred Heart of Jesus.

    Finally he said that although it was up to the delegates which side to join, he recommended two Polish Roman Catholic organizations, namely, the 8regular Polish Roman Catholic Union under the Guidance of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and Unia Polska.

    Then Reverend D. Majer took this matter up. He did not condemn the regular Polish Roman Catholic Union under the Guidance of the Sacred Heart; on the contrary, he said that this organization is Catholic and Polish, but that, inasmuch as "The shirt is closer to the skin than the smock" [Polish proverb], he would like to see this organization join Unia Polska. He added that Unia Polska, besides paying a large death benefit, sees to it that its members get some help when they are old.

    As to the Polish National Alliance, Reverend Majer said that he used to belong to it himself, but withdrew from it, not on account of its principles and aims, which are good, but because these principles were being perverted. However, he did not attack the Polish National Alliance. He concluded his speech by recommending Unia Polska to the delegates in case their organization 9was dissolved.

    Subsequently, the secretary read the minutes of the last convention, held in 1893. Pijanowski motioned that the reading of the minutes from the last convention be discontinued. Maciejewski protested against the motion, arguing that the minutes revealed many activities unknown to the delegates. He was seconded by Napieralski, and Pijanowski withdrew his motion. Thereupon Grochowski, the secretary, proceeded to read the minutes.

    At 4 P. M. the session adjourned for fifteen minutes.

    The reading of the minutes lasted until 6 P. M. The financial statement showed that, during the last fiscal year, the gross income of the organization was $2,187.29, as against expenses of $1,565.90, and a cash balance of $621.39. After the reading of this statement, the session was adjourned until Wednesday.

    10

    Wednesday morning the delegates went to Saint Adalbert Church to hear a Requiem Mass for the dead members of the organization.

    When the delegates returned to the hall, there followed a roll call and the minutes of the Tuesday afternoon session were read.

    Thereupon the committees submitted their reports, as follows:

    The committee assigned to interview the Blessed Mary Society reported that it had not accomplished anything because the officials of the society were not at home.

    Polonez reported that the Saint Joseph Society would pay all dues after its next meeting.

    Joseph Napieralski reported that the Holy Mary Society would pay its dues after the convention.

    11

    The financial reports came next. Grochowski announced that he could not make a complete report because some societies had paid their dues the day before. The financial secretary was given two hours to prepare his report. In the meantime, the problem of what to do with the organization was taken up and debated. It was decided that the delegates present the instructions given them by their societies in writing. Thereupon the session was adjourned for half an hour, so that the delegates could write their instructions.

    As soon as the session was resumed, Grochowski was asked to read his report, and it was disclosed that he could not read it because he had had no time to prepare it. Maciejewski explained that the Records Committee's function was not to audit the books, but to see that the accounts were properly kept.

    After long debates, it was decided that a financial statement taken from the books would suffice.

    12

    Grochowski announced that the Saint Stanislaus Society of South Chicago had not paid its dues and had withdrawn from the organization.

    Maciejewski reported that the Saint Casimir Society had not paid its dues and had joined the Polish National Alliance. After settling other minor matters, the session was adjourned until 2 P. M.

    At 2 P. M. the chairman opened the session with a prayer and the secretary made the roll call. All delegates were present.

    This session proved very interesting, even for outsiders. The galleries were filled with people that came to hear the delegates. Everyone was eager to know what would become of the organization. Would it continue to exist as an independent body or would it join some other organization, and if so, which one?

    13

    After reading the minutes of the morning session, the secretary proceeded to read the written instructions prepared by the delegates.

    These instructions revealed that: most of the members of the Saint Adalbert Society, seventy-eight of them, to be exact, wanted to belong to the Polish National Alliance. Out of the remaining members, twenty-seven voted for the Polish Roman Catholic Union under the Sacred Heart of Jesus and five for Unia Polska.

    The Holy Name Society voted as follows: Nineteen members opposed any change; eighteen wanted to join the Polish National Alliance; twenty-four did not vote; the remainder wanted to join Unia Polska.

    The Knights of Saint Casimir Society voted as follows: three votes for the Polish National Alliance, twenty-two for Unia Polska.

    14

    The Krakuses of Saint Gregory Society voted as follows: "If the Polish Roman Catholic Union under the Guidance of the Queen of the Polish Crown is dissolved, twenty-four members of our group will join the Polish National Alliance."

    The Saint Dominic Society decided to join either Unia Polska or the regular Polish Roman Catholic Union in America, but not the Polish National Alliance.

    Twenty-eight members of the Saint Stanislaus Kostka Society decided to join the Polish National Alliance.

    The Saint Joseph Society voted as follows: twenty-six members for the Polish National Alliance, and three for Unia Polska.

    The situation may be summed up as follows: one hundred and eighty votes for the Polish National Alliance; one hundred for Unia Polska, and twenty-seven for the Polish Roman Catholic Union. Eighty-three members were undecided 15as to which side to join--Unia Polska or the Polish Roman Catholic Union.

    Nineteen members did not desire any change.

    Francis Kaminski declared that forty-eight members of his society were in favor of Unia Polska, saying that those who had not voted previously had expressed their desire to favor the decision of the majority.

    Maciejewski declared that the majority should decide.

    Gulcz maintained that the Holy Name Society was with the majority.

    Maciejewski motioned that the instructions be read again. His motion was carried, and the instructions were read again.

    Pijanowski declared that the entire Saint Adalbert Society desired to belong to the Polish National Alliance.

    16

    Out of the sixty-one members belonging to the Holy Name Society, eighteen desired to join the Polish National Alliance, and the others said they would abide by the decision of the convention. And this is how the organization stands.

    W. Pijanowski proposed that a committee be sent to the three large organizations, for the purpose of ascertaining the terms under which they would take in the Union. This motion was supported by K. Gulcz, with an amendment that not a committee, but the administration, should undertake this task.

    Herman pointed out that there was no administration, that the terms of the officials of the Central Board had expired, and that, in order to continue to function a new Central Board would have to be elected.

    Mr. Pijanowski insisted that his motion be accepted and demanded that a committee be appointed.

    17

    Mr. Napieralski demanded that the Central Board be re-elected, or else the Polish Roman Catholic Union would be considered dissolved.

    Grochowski took the floor and called upon the convention to decide which organization the Polish Roman Catholic Union should belong to, arguing that the societies knew long before the convention was convened that our organization would be dissolved. This motion was defeated.

    Finally, Mr. Pijanowski's motion was put to a vote and carried. After a long debate, it was decided that the committee should consist of five members--B. L. Maciejewski, W. Jaworski, Joseph Herman, Grochowski, and Jackowski.

    The Committee was given fourteen days in which to interview the three large organizations.

    At the request of Pijanowski, Reverend John Radziejewski took the floor and 18declared that inasmuch as the result of the voting proved that the members did not favor the Polish Roman Catholic Union, he recommended heartily Unia Polska.

    Reverend Majer took the floor and declared he did not speak in favor or against any organization. He went on to say that if the Polish Roman Catholic Union joined Unia Polska, the latter would change its name to Polish Union under the Guidance of the Queen of the Polish Crown. Reverend Majer also said that as soon as the organization joined Unia Polska, the new members would enjoy the same rights and privileges they had before. His speech was greatly applauded.

    Herman, chairman of the convention, asked Rozan, secretary of Unia Polska, whether it was true that Unia Polska intended to join the large Polish Roman Catholic Union. Rozan answered that, Unia Polska had sent a delegate to the Cleveland convention as a matter of courtesy, but not for the purpose 19of joining that organization.

    Rozan thanked the delegates for the welcome he had received at the convention, and asked the assembly to send a delegate to Unia Polska's convention if the Union is not dissolved.

    The session was then adjourned for half an hour.

    The session was reopened with a request by W. Pijanowski, who asked that the general secretary submit a financial statement for the last year and that the accounts be closed.

    Grochowski, the secretary, declared that he had not prepared any statement, but that his books were in good shape, as confirmed by the Records Committee.

    K. Gulcz, chairman of the Records Committee, declared that the accounts were in good order. Herman made a motion that the books be signed by the committee, 20to which the assembly agreed, and the formality of attaching the signatures followed.

    Napieralski motioned that the terms of the contract made with the publisher of Sztandar (Standard), the organ of the Union be taken under consideration. On a motion by Drzycimski, it was decided that Sztandar would be published during this year, even if the organization was dissolved.

    The general secretary read the report for last year. W. Pijanowski declared that he, as a member of the Records Committee, would not sign the books unless he had a chance to go over them. In his report, the secretary did not even mention the number of dead members. The assembly agreed to this. It was resolved to pay twenty dollars for the hall and twenty dollars for the Mass.

    Thereupon the assembly proceeded to elect a new administration. W. Pijanowski motioned that the present administration be retained by acclamation. He was 21seconded by Maciejewski and opposed by Napieralski and Kaminski. Pijanowski and Maciejewski left the hall. Kaminski motioned that the societies be informed that these delegates had deserted the convention before the session was over.

    Thereupon the election of the administration was put to a vote. J. Napieralski and Joseph Herman were elected president and vice-president respectively by acclamation. P. Morzynski and Vincent Jaworski were elected secretary and cashier respectively.

    The assembly then proceeded to elect members for the advisory board. Although the advisory board, usually consisted of six members, this time the number of candidates was so small that Napieralski motioned that only three be elected. The advisory board, therefore, consists of John Rochowiak, John Jackowski, and J. Drzycimski.

    22

    The minutes of the convention will be read at its next session, to be held within two weeks. Installation of the officials followed. The convention was closed with the singing of "Boze Cos Polske", (God love Poland).

    According to the program of the convention, the delegates from societies belonging to this Union gathered today at 8 A.M. at Pulaski Hall. The societies represented were Saint Adalbert Society ...

    Polish
    III B 4, II D 1, II D 2
  • Abendpost -- February 17, 1896
    Club "Veritas"

    Under the name "Veritas" there was yesterday founded at 41 N. Clark Street a Club for the purpose of giving insurance to male and female employees of any kind, free medical service in cases of sickness; also free medicine and a free room in a hospital or private home. Unemployed members shall be assisted to obtain work in case of wage disputes receive a free lawyer and advancement of legal and court fees. The officials were elected: for president: D. Clemens; for business manager: Gustav Strelow,-

    Under the name "Veritas" there was yesterday founded at 41 N. Clark Street a Club for the purpose of giving insurance to male and female employees of any kind, free ...

    German
    II D 2, II D 1
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- May 23, 1896
    Low Assessments in the Polish Roman Catholic Union

    The Polish Roman Catholic Union under the protection of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, in spite of the attacks to which it has been subjected since its last convention, is growing and becoming stronger every day. The enthusiasm of the officers is visible at every step.

    A glance over any issue of the official organ of the Polish Roman Catholic Union, Wiarai Ojczyzna (Faith and Fatherland), will convince us of this. The officers are ever watchful to the Union's every need, and every week participate in discussing this or that subject. Financial matters are carried on actively and scrupulously.

    The result is self-evident. In spite of the resignation of the Milwaukee members, the assessments paid by members of the Polish Roman Catholic Union are being reduced. We have mentioned this in the past. The assessments are lower now than ever before.

    2

    The assessment for the month beginning May 20, beats, as the American expression says, all previous records. It amounts to forty-five cents per member.

    This is an unheard-of low assessment, and proves decidedly that the Polish Roman Catholic Union under the protection of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, with God's help and the careful management of its officers, stands on a solid and firm foundation and is the most convenient association for the Poles.

    The Polish Roman Catholic Union under the protection of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, in spite of the attacks to which it has been subjected since its last convention, is ...

    Polish
    II D 1, II D 2
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 01, 1897
    New Officers Chosen to Head the Pulaski Mutual Life Insurance Company of Chicago

    A new board of directors and officers for next year was elected at the annual meeting of the Pulaski Mutual Fire Insurance Company of Chicago. The new board is as follows: Albert Jedrzejek, August J. Kowalski, Andrew J. Kwasigroch, Andrew Schultz, Emil H. Bessa, John F. Smulski, John Czekala, Joseph Schroeder, John Suwalski, Jacob Jakubowski, Matthew Siuda, Thomas Krolik, and Hubert Abraham.

    The administrative body for the following year is Albert Jedrzejek, president; Andrew Schultz, vice-president; August J. Kowalski, treasurer; Andrew J. Kwasigroch, secretary; John F. Smulski, attorney.

    An executive committee also was chosen, namely, Andrew Schultz, John Czekala, Thomas Krolik, Jacob Jakubowski, and John Suwalski.

    2

    The general offices of the company are located at 163 West Blackhawk Street, Chicago, Illinois.

    A. J. Kwasigroch, secretary.

    A new board of directors and officers for next year was elected at the annual meeting of the Pulaski Mutual Fire Insurance Company of Chicago. The new board is as ...

    Polish
    II D 2, II A 2, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- June 02, 1897
    The Approaching Polish National Alliance Convention (Editorial)

    We are going to say nothing about the death benefit, the first of a twelve-point program arranged by the censor of the Polish National Alliance for the coming convention. This matter is primarily an internal function of the organization and concerns us not at all. However, it must be admitted that [failure of] a successful solution of this problem would result in further losses for the Alliance as an insurance association with a relatively small number of Polish youth, who joined it to save the society of old invalids from bankruptcy. This end is inevitable because of the ever increasing death-benefit claims and the growth of sick benefits being paid to those who are ill or unfit for work.

    And now let us focus our attention on the second point, which deals with the proposition of publishing Dziennik Narodowy (National Daily). This project 2was recently discussed in the columns of Zgoda (Harmony) and other Polish American newspapers. The result of this journalistic discussion was such that the Zgoda has denounced the plan; however, some of the patriotic knights, including some editors, have sharpened their pencils for action upon the ungrateful whetstone of patriotism without religion and beautiful worthless phrases. Such persons desire to grow fat at the expense of the treasury of the Polish National Alliance and are little concerned whether the proposed daily is going to be a success or a failure; whether it is necessary or not; whether it is going to damage or exhaust completely the treasury of the Alliance.

    That complete ruin is facing it, is a matter that we don't doubt in the least. Proof of this is the publication of Zgoda, a venture that has been consuming large sums of money from the very start and has failed to win a following for the newspaper, whose unpatriotic pages not only come out after great difficulty but are also pointless. Today the Alliance members are still 3reluctant to read Zgoda, although they pay for its subscription. Its income is so small it is not worth mentioning. Conditions there are probably comparable to those of the Independent newspapers. [Newspapers connected with the Independent Church movement--independent of the Pope]. The instigators are rather noisy but lack the power to reason. It seems that these newspapers get along somehow even if they are not read.

    Conditions are worse among the dailies, whose future depends upon many years of experience and a large capital, as for example, in our case. How many dailies have already failed, causing bankruptcy to many of their publishers? Our Polish dailies did not rise to their present status suddenly, and they were established in communities where no competition existed. The Milwaukee Kuryer (Courier) rose upon the ruins of several weeklies, and at the beginning it was very small in size. It was published in a town where the small Orzel Polski [Polish Eagle] gave it so much competition that it would have folded up had it not been for the official advertising it received, without which it 4could not exist today, for if it would cease to be Catholic it would cease to be Polish.

    We don't know whether or not the Polak w Ameryce [Pole in America] brings a profit to its publishers. We do know that until recently it was published three times a week and that now it is a daily. And this in the city of Buffalo, where the subversive Echo is a competitor.

    Our Dziennik Chicagoski did not grow overnight. The Polish Publishing Company had to experiment for many years, gradually working up from the weekly Wihra i Ojczyzna [Faith and Fatherland]. When business interests had been expanded, it was decided to venture upon a daily publication. This attempt was graced with marked success. Dziennik Chicagoski has grown upon a solid foundation and has no competition because it leans upon the immovable rock of religion and nationality, treats all parties impartially, looks after the best interest of every faction, does not favor one organization at the expense 5of another, and serves the interest of all.

    What kind of competition did the late Dziennik Polski (Polish Daily) give the Dziennik Chicagoski? It expired in less than a year after a waste of $20,000. What kind of competition will Dziennik Narodowy give us, unless it will try to spoil everything that is Polish, Catholic, and true? We will defeat it by the force of our arguments, not deeming if necessary to increase the size of our newspaper or reduce its subscription and advertising rates. Instead of publishing Dziennik Chicagoski in the afternoon, we are free to have it out in the streets in the morning, if it is necessary, or twice a day for that matter. This will be of better advantage to us, and what will happen to our liberal competitor?

    Applying some common sense, it is safe to wager ten to one that no Polish daily will be able to compete with Dziennik Chicagoski. That being the case, will there be a person willing to invest his money for a new daily in Chicago?

    6

    If not, why then does the censor of the Polish National Alliance have this project in mind, when he knows full well that as an insurance organization the association he heads has no right to speculate?

    The censor's project in this case seems to be an attempt at tapping the Alliance treasury for personal gain. This is how the situation presents itself to us and many other persons of sound reasoning, with whom we had an opportunity to discuss the question of the Dziennik Narodowy.

    As to the moral motives of the group of Polish National Alliance members who are supporting the project of establishing a new daily for the purpose of sowing winds and gathering storms, we wish to remain silent. There will be such persons at the coming Polish National Alliance convention as will take up this matter properly.

    We are going to say nothing about the death benefit, the first of a twelve-point program arranged by the censor of the Polish National Alliance for the coming convention. This ...

    Polish
    II B 2 d 1, III B 4, II D 2