The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 22, 1863
    The Northwest Fair for the Support of Sick and Wounded Union Soldiers An Appeal to the German Ladies of Chicago (Editorial)

    As everybody knows, the local Ladies' Aid For The Support of Sick and Wounded Union Soldiers, recently suggested that a great fair be held, and that the entire Northwest be invited to participate, the proceeds to be placed at the disposal of the Chicago Board of Health. The idea was generally received very favorably not only in Illinois but also in neighboring states, and the fair will undoubtedly be the greatest Chicago has ever seen. It will be opened on Tuesday, October 27, at Bryan's Hall, and will continue for two weeks.

    The net proceeds are to be devoted to the support of sick and wounded Union soldiers, without respect to race, creed, or national origin. So German 2ladies will certainly give the project their full support. American ladies have had more than one opportunity to convince themselves of the fine quality of the handiwork of German ladies, and the latter will now have occasion to show that they are not only very skillful but also very patriotic.

    Mrs. Hoge and Mrs. Livermore, who head the enterprise, have requested that we ask the German ladies who wish to lend their aid to this praiseworthy, humane undertaking to meet at three o'clock this afternoon at Bryan's Hall, for the purpose of discussing some matters pertinent to the fair. The German ladies of Chicago will undoubtedly appear and will organize a German department.

    As everybody knows, the local Ladies' Aid For The Support of Sick and Wounded Union Soldiers, recently suggested that a great fair be held, and that the entire Northwest be ...

    German
    II D 10, II B 1 c 3, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 26, 1863
    Northwest Fair Ladies of German Division Meet at German House

    The ladies of the German Division of the Northwest Fair met on Sunday, October 26, at the German House for the purpose of receiving gifts from German contributors. By three o'clock in the afternoon, four hundred and sixty donations had arrived and the ladies had all they could do to estimate their value and to number them.

    Anyone wishing to get an idea of the accomplishments of German industry and perseverance in the cause of the Union, specifically in behalf of our sick and wounded soldiers, need only view the many crocheted, knitted, and embroidered articles which our diligent ladies have made for the Fair.

    It is impossible to describe all the things that have been delivered at the German House; however, we shall mention some that are especially attractive.

    2

    We saw a sofa that was plaited of the finest straw and which will grace any parlor. On one table there were the finest silver spoons, forks, knives, and napkin-rings, and even gold penholders with silver handles--all of them the handiwork of our German ladies. In the embroidery department especially, there are many very fine articles: pillowcases, coverings for chairs, seats, beds, tables, sofas, etc; all in a harmonious variety of colors. There is also much excellent network, and many good knitted articles, such as shawls, mufflers, ladies' and men's caps.

    We could continue telling about other interesting and useful articles that we saw, but we are convinced that our readers will profit more by going to the German House and seeing them. And, lest they forget, these things must be sold, if our soldiers are to be cared for.

    On our "sight-seeing tour" we noted particularly, that men were conspicuous by their absence. The ladies were doing all the work--even decorating the 3room in which the articles are to be displayed. They ought to avenge themselves by making many sales to the men. We hope that the latter will come with well-filled pocketbooks.

    The ladies of the German Division of the Northwest Fair met on Sunday, October 26, at the German House for the purpose of receiving gifts from German contributors. By three ...

    German
    II D 10, II B 1 c 3, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 10, 1863
    Final Report on Proceeds of the Northwest Fair

    Receipts in Bryan Hall $ 9,737.58
    Receipts in Restaurant 6,446.67
    Receipts in Supervisor's Office 2,121.54
    Receipts in Metropolitan Hall 5,000.00
    Receipts from sales 30,000.00
    Receipts in from German Division 3,500.00
    Cash donations 12,000.00
    Received in Art Gallery 3,000.00
    Total $71,805.79
    Disbursements $ 6,000.00
    Net profit $65,805.79

    <table> <tr> <td>Receipts in Bryan Hall</td> <td>$ 9,737.58</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Receipts in Restaurant</td> <td>6,446.67</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Receipts in Supervisor's Office</td> <td>2,121.54</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Receipts in Metropolitan Hall</td> <td>5,000.00</td> </tr> <tr> ...

    German
    II D 10, II B 1 c 3, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 13, 1863
    Northwest Fair Official Report of the German Division

    The proceeds of the German Division of the Northwest Fair for the support of sick and wounded Union soldiers were as follows:

    Received through the sale of donations from Wisconsin $1,464.95
    Received through sale of goods donated by Chicago Germans 2,335.00
    Total $3,799.95

    The above sum was delivered to the Northwestern Branch of the United States Sanitary Commission.

    Chicago, Illinois, November 11, 1863. Mrs. Elsie Schneider.
    Mrs. Elsie Solomon.

    The proceeds of the German Division of the Northwest Fair for the support of sick and wounded Union soldiers were as follows: <table> <tr> <td>Received through the sale of donations ...

    German
    II D 10, II B 1 c 3, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 05, 1864
    German Ladies Meet in New Turnhalle

    In response to the appeal of Mr. Johann Gindele, a number of German ladies of Chicago met in the new Turnhalle to discuss matters referred to in the appeal. Mr. Gindele had invited Mr. Heinrich Greenbaum to be present at the meeting. After Mr. Gindele had opened the meeting, the organization work was completed by the election of Mr. Heinrich Greenbaum as secretary. Following a lengthy debate, the resolutions given below were adopted. All the delegates who were elected are requested to meet on Wednesday afternoon in the new Turnhalle. Meetings of the American Ladies' Aid are held every Saturday afternoon at two o'clock in Light Guard Hall, corner of State and Randolph Streets.

    [The Resolutions]

    "Whereas, Prominent members of the Association for the Relief of Soldiers' Families have expressed the wish that the German ladies join the above-named organization for the purpose of investigating the claims or requests of the wives 2of German soldiers, and of generally promoting the noble cause of the Association; be it hereby

    "Resolved, That it has long been the desire of the German ladies to be actively engaged in the work of supporting the dependents of soldiers, and that we therefore gladly join the Association for the Relief of Soldiers' Families, assuming that our representatives will be considered to be, and will be treated as, full-fledged members; and be it further

    "Resolved, That the following ladies be requested to represent the German residents: Mrs. Elizabeth Schneider, Mrs. Caspar Butz, Mrs. Caroline Schurz, [names of twelve others omitted in translation]; and be it further

    "Resolved, That the minutes of this meeting shall be published in the German newspapers, and that a copy of these resolutions shall be sent to the 3Association for the Relief of Soldiers' Families.

    "J. G. Gindele, president."

    "A. Greenbaum, secretary."

    In response to the appeal of Mr. Johann Gindele, a number of German ladies of Chicago met in the new Turnhalle to discuss matters referred to in the appeal. Mr. ...

    German
    II D 10, I G, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 30, 1866
    Of Chicago Arbeiterverein

    Chicago, Illinois, March 21, 1866.

    To the Honorable Board of police Commissioners of the city of Chicago: The Chicago Arbeiterverein has elected the undersigned to act as a committee for the purpose of bringing about an understanding with your honorable Board, in regard to certain issues, and we beg permission to present the following matters:

    Through the newspapers and other sources of information we have learned that the members of two other societies, or associations, have been informed that they must discontinue their recreational activities on Sunday evenings. Of course, the Arbeiterverein has nothing to do with the recreation of other organizations, nor do we wish to express our opinions concerning the motives for the Board's action against these societies. However, during the past few weeks, one of these periodic religious movements, generally called "revivals," 2has been in process, and the Chicago Arbeiterverein, always intent upon avoiding any offense against citizen who differ with our religious opinions, takes the view that during the past eight years (the past four under police protection) these "revivals," usually held on Sunday evenings, have taken the form of a kind of social entertainment (sic). Therefore, we ask: Does the above mentioned notice also apply to our organization?

    We are aware that you have the right to answer: Wait until you receive notice; but, as loyal citizens, we would not like to offend against any law, nor would we like to suffer the consequences of not knowing the law, nor do we want our members to be taken by surprise by a policeman and disturbed in their innocent and harmless amusements which are in complete accord with the religious liberty guar-anteed by the Constitution, nor do we need an excuse to be provided to make us responsible for an offense against any state law that is in agreement with the spirit of the Constitution,

    Should our social entertainments be prohibited by order of your Board, we would respectfully point cut that in 1861 the Board of Police Commissioners entered 3into the following pact with the president of our society:

    1. The President will be responsible for the maintenance of order, and the police shall not interfere with our social entertainment;

    2. No brass musical instruments shall be used at such entertainments, out of respect for the religious convictions of our fellow citizens, and one or more violins, but only one flute, bass violin, or piano shall be used.

    3. The police will not consider these entertainments to be "illegal," as long as the concerts and dances do not disturb the neighborhood.

    The Arbeiterverein has strictly observed these conditions despite contradictions by a newspaper, the Illinois Staats-Zeitung, two part owners of which were expelled from the organization on account of their loud, mischievous conduct; they even went so far as to break up one of our public meetings and to slander everybody who did not agree with their arrogant opinions.

    We trust that your honorable Board will pay no attention to the malicious 4utterances which these "snakes" publish against our society. Had they conducted themselves in an orderly manner, they would still be members of our society.

    We do not advertise our entertainments, nor do we invite strangers to participate in them. We have a Committee on Order and a Committee of Ushers who admit only members or strangers who are accompanied or invited by members, and the members must give their word of honor that they can vouch for and will be responsible for the behavior of these strangers.

    The money which is realized through our entertainments is the property of the organization and is used for defraying the expenses incurred by maintaining our library and reading room, and for the support of sick members or their dependent widows and orphans.

    [Translator's note: The next (final) paragraph of this article has evidently 5been "removed" by rats or mice, so it is not possible to offer a translation.]

    We hope most sincerely that you will permit the Arbeiterverein to continue its Sunday evening entertainments under the conditions which were previously agreed upon.

    Very respectfully,

    C. Degenhardt,

    C. Haussner,

    T. Hielscher,

    Ed. Schlaeger.

    Chicago, Illinois, March 21, 1866. To the Honorable Board of police Commissioners of the city of Chicago: The Chicago Arbeiterverein has elected the undersigned to act as a committee for ...

    German
    I B 2, II B 2 a, II D 10, III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 12, 1866
    Report of Agent of German Society for the Protection of Immigrants for the Month of May 1866.

    Following is the report of my activities during the month of May, 1866:

    Applications for work 279
    Secured employment for 214
    Letters received 33
    Letters written 40
    Families aided financially 15
    Information and advice given to 132
    Located baggage for 4
    Secured railroad passes for 7
    Depots and landing places visited 14
    Caused arrest of "runners" 2
    Secured passage at cost of Society 2
    Issued recommendations to 26
    2

    On May 20, I found Mrs. Henriette Stroeger, widow of an immigrant who died en voyage, her infant child, and her sister lying sick and helpless near the Milwaukee Railroad depot. I had them brought to the Hospital for Women and Children, on Ohio Street where they were restored to health at the Society's expense. Another immigrant who was brought to this institution was treated gratis by Dr. G. Schloetzer. This man has not yet recovered from his illness.

    Our Police Commissioner should place a special policeman who is able to speak both English and German at the various depots to protect travelers, especially immigrants; this officer ought to be present at the arrival and departure of every immigrant train to see to it that immigrants are not mistreated or defrauded by railroad agents, confidence men, expressmen, or by "runners" or proprietors of saloons and hotels which are patronized by immigrants. By making it the sole duty of a policeman to patrol the depots and landing places, the Police Commissioner would do much to prevent the many just complaints that I hear frequently.

    3

    Immigrants who travel from New York to Iowa are often forced to pay the transportation charges on excess baggage from Chicago to Iowa twice, once in New York and again in Chicago, at the depot of the Galena division of the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad. This railroad will accept a ticket issued by the railroad agent in Castel Gardens, New York only if the weight of the baggage is written thereon plainly in ink, so that the charges on excess baggage for the trip from Chicago to Iowa can be collected from the agent at New York. However, these agents are frequently intent upon their own interests and they use a lead pencil rather than pen and ink. The figures recording the amount of excess baggage are then written so illegibly on the tickets that the officers of the Northwestern Railroad refuse to accept them as valid. I have brought these facts to the attention of the Commissioner of Immigration stationed at Castle Gardens, New York, and shall follow up the matter until it is disposed of in favor of immigrants.

    On May 30, Mr. Thiener, a German immigrant, bought his passage from Chicago 4to Gillmon, Illinois from the agent of the Illinois Central Railroad. The fare is $3.65. Mr. Thiener gave the agent a twenty-franc piece, expecting to receive $1.35, the premium of exchange, in return. The agent refused to pay the premium, as did the acting superintendent of the railroad when I complained to him. The latter informed me that their agent had been instructed to accept gold or paper money but not to refund the prevalent premium on gold, and that none of the railroads of the West were accepting gold at the market value. Therefore, our German citizens ought to warn all immigrants with whom they come in contact against paying gold for railroad passage.

    About a thousand trunks and other articles--among them much baggage that belongs to German immigrants--is stored in the warehouse of the Illinois and Michigan Central Railroad, where they are kept for two years. Could not these railroads show their appreciation for the many dollars the public pays into their coffers by publishing an exact list of these articles in local newspapers?

    5

    W. C. Boeckmann and Johann Colljung, who arrived here via the steamship "England", which left Liverpool on March 29, have asked me to issue the following warning: The English steamship "England" sailed from Liverpool with 1,312 passengers aboard; 667 of these died at sea or in quarantine at Halifax. There were 563 German immigrants on the ship, and about one half of them died. The food that was served during the voyage was of very poor quality; the fish and the potatoes were spoiled. The rooms on the ship were overcrowded, the ventilation in the steerage was very poor, and everywhere there was filth. Many German passengers were "relieved" of their baggage, or their baggage was taken from them, by health officers at Halifax, who made no reimbursement.

    Frequently, immigrants complain that the transportation of baggage from Baltimore to Chicago by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad leaves much to be desired. This company has not yet introduced the check system, and although C. F. Hillebrand, the Baltimore and Ohio agent at Baltimore, always assures immigrants that their baggage will arrive at Chicago at the same time they 6do, they often must wait ten to fourteen days at Chicago, or continue their journey without their belongings.

    In conclusion, I wish to acknowledge and commend the conduct of John H. Gund, a Police Sergeant, who so kindly and sympathetically cared for the needs of the family of M. J. J. Tagg, who was friendless and destitute when he arrived in this city.

    Ernst J. Knnobelsdorff, Agent.

    Following is the report of my activities during the month of May, 1866: <table> <tr> <td>Applications for work</td> <td>279</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Secured employment for</td> <td>214</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Letters received</td> <td>33</td> ...

    German
    II D 10, II D 8, III G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 08, 1867
    Report of Secretary of Aid Society for German Immigrants

    October 1, 1866 to January 1, 1867.

    Balance on hand $386.00
    Dues for quarter 418.73
    Rent for quarter 22.50
    Total $827.23

    Disbursements.

    Charitable purposes $239.45
    Printing 4.50
    Agent's salary 180.00
    Rent 60.00
    Miscellaneous 57.50
    Total $541.45
    Balance in treasury $285.78
    2

    The Society has loaned $229 to immigrant families. This amount is secured by promissory notes.

    C. Knobelsdorff,

    Secretary.

    October 1, 1866 to January 1, 1867. <table> <tr> <td>Balance on hand</td> <td>$386.00</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Dues for quarter</td> <td>418.73</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Rent for quarter</td> <td>22.50</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Total</td> <td>$827.23</td> </tr> ...

    German
    II D 10, III G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 22, 1867
    The Moegling Society

    Yesterday the treasurer received the following contributions: Chicago Turngemeinde, $100; [names of smaller contributors, fifty-one in number, omitted in translation]; total, $323.75. Previously acknowledged, $512; grand total $835.75. Collectors are requested to report to our office every afternoon before five o'clock. [Translator's note: This money was being collected for the relief of the sick and destitute German patriot, Theodor Moegling.]

    Yesterday the treasurer received the following contributions: Chicago Turngemeinde, $100; [names of smaller contributors, fifty-one in number, omitted in translation]; total, $323.75. Previously acknowledged, $512; grand total $835.75. Collectors are ...

    German
    II D 10, III H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 28, 1867
    The Moegling Society

    Friederich Hecker, an old friend and war comrade of Theodor Moegling, writes:

    "In Germany people always have money for various kinds of amusements and sports, but it has long been a custom there to let patriots starve.

    "Moegling, who resigned from a lucrative office for the sake of the people, and who fought for liberty not only in parliament but also on the battlefield, where he courageously led his band against the enemy, was wounded severely and crippled permanently. He has a just claim to immediate help from all patriots. And even if the Germans in Germany have nothing but pleasant words to offer him, Americans of German descent will set a good example for their former countrymen. We Americans of German parentage will give no one just cause to say that we permitted German patriots to succumb to misery and need."

    In this connection, we wish to inform our readers that the noble example set 2by the Chicago Turngemeinde has not been in vain. The St. Louis Turngemeinde has taken the necessary steps to join in helping Moegling, and in Cincinnati, at a meeting of Germans under the chairmanship of Gereral Wilich, it was voted to render the "German patriot in Germany" all possible aid.

    In Chicago, $1501.25 has been contributed to date; and although Chicago leads all other cities in the United States, there are quite a few local Germans who have been blessed with this world's goods in no small measure but who have not yet opened their hearts and their pocketbooks to lend a hand in this worthy cause. We hope they will respond to our appeal very shortly.

    Friederich Hecker, an old friend and war comrade of Theodor Moegling, writes: "In Germany people always have money for various kinds of amusements and sports, but it has long been ...

    German
    II D 10, III H