The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Svornost -- October 27, 1884
    The Memorable Day of the Reverence to Bohemian Art in America.

    The unveiling of the portrait of Jungmann, painted by Chicago's Bohemian Artist, Mrs. Maria Koupalova - Luskova.

    Last Sunday at 2 P.M., in the Bohemian National Hall, on 18th Street, a large audience of prominent Bohemians, called in by the Chairman of the Lodge, was present at the unveiling of the portrait of Mr. Jungmann, ordered by the Lodge and painted by the noted Bohemian Artist, Mrs. Maria Koupalova- Luskova.

    The artist and her husband, the lawyer, C.D.Luser, were invited to the ceremony.

    The celebration was opened with a speech by the Chairman, J. Rezny.

    The portrait was placed on a table on the side of the hall in a space very well lighted. At the last words of the speaker, the veil dropped and before us appeared Jungmann, life size, seated in a chair with a manuscript in his hand. The picture is 6 feet high and 4 feet wide in a richly gilded frame. It is a 2veritable image of our patriot, Jungman, artistically finished by our young painter who is acknowledged in the highest art circles of America.

    This picture will be an adornment of our National Hall for many years and an artistic remembrance and pride for the Jungmann Lodge. Every educated Bohemian, visiting Chicago, should not miss seeing this beautiful and precious portrait. The artist, Mrs. Luskova was paid $75. However, it is worth $300. The frame cost $40.

    Mr. Lusek, in the name of his wife, expressed his thanks for the acknowledgment of her work and congratulated the Jungmann lodge on its progress and cultural work. A guest from St. Louis Father Fr. Masek praised the progress of the Bohemians in Chicago and the choice of the artist. The Committee and a few guests than passed downstairs, where refreshments were served.

    The celebration was finished with many toasts to the artist, to the lodges and to Jungmann's honor. We must confess truthfully that this celebration left a very deep impression and in our imagination we visioned the future of the Bohemian people in America. We can see at this time more and more glimmering lights, far 3away from us, that are marking a long life for our nation. To-day's celebration marked the erection of one more monument, permanent and effective for the honor and memory of the Bohemians in America. We always can point to it with pride.

    The unveiling of the portrait of Jungmann, painted by Chicago's Bohemian Artist, Mrs. Maria Koupalova - Luskova. Last Sunday at 2 P.M., in the Bohemian National Hall, on 18th Street, ...

    Bohemian
    II C, II A 3 c, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 25, 1885
    The Schiller Monument

    The collections for the Schiller Monument fund can be closed in a very short time, if all German Societies and Lodges will decide at once regarding the amount of their contributions, and if the one hundred selected members of the Collection Committee will sacrifice one or two days time in the near future to receive these contributions. No sacrifice in time or money should be large enough to glorify the man, whose name is buried deep in the heart of every German and whose creations have been enjoyed by all Germans.

    The one hundred chosen collectors are requested to hand all money from collections and donations to Mr. Gustav Stieglitz, Treas., 192 E. Harrison Street.

    The collections for the Schiller Monument fund can be closed in a very short time, if all German Societies and Lodges will decide at once regarding the amount of their ...

    German
    II C, III B 2
  • Svornost -- July 27, 1885
    The Unveiling of the Monument of Professor Ladimir Klacel.

    It was really an impressive festival for our Bohemian metropolis. Thousands of people gathered at the unveiling of the monument of our great teacher, Ladimir Klacel. The festival committee was right in its decision not to have a procession led by bands; this removed the possibility of the disparagement of the Bohemian name in the opinion of other nationalities.

    As the Americans are mourning the loss of their best son, Ulysses S. Grant, the whole town is wrapped in deep sorrow. If we had marched in procession with a band, the local newspapers would again scold us, that we have no sentiment and no regard for the sentiments of our American co-citizens.

    The festival committee took the highest care not to give the smallest cause for complaints. Yesterday's procession was a real funeral procession. The participating societies marched quietly timed only by a drum, and all the banners were veiled. We have proved that we can respect the prominent men of this country, and 2we were praised for this in the press.

    The trains brought huge masses of Bohemians to the cemetery, they formed a large circle around the monument, the orchestra played the national hymn, and the mixed choir of the singing society,Lumir, sang a dirge in lowered voices. After this many wreaths were placed on the base of the monument.

    A long memorial speech formally delivered the monument to the Administration of the National Cemetery with the words: "Here is the result of two years of effort, the monument of our glorified, honorable Professor Ladimir Klacel. I am turning it over to your hands to include it in the estate of the National Cemetery, to protect it and to keep it as a proud symbol of the Bohemian people and as an inspiration for the national spirit for many future generations."

    DESCRIPTION OF THE MONUMENT.

    It is located in the middle of the newly opened second division of the cemetery, 3partly hidden among the trees, although it can be seen from all parts of the cemetery. It is thirteen feet high; the bust is carved in white marble, larger than life-size, two feet six inches high. The similarity of the features is exceptionally good and portrays the celebrity at the time that he lived in Chicago before his illness. The base of the monument is four by four feet square and one foot four inches high. The column is three feet ten inches high and supports the base of the bust. Except for the bust, the monument is of a greyish-blue granite, imported from the Hurricane Islands.

    The inscription on the front part of the pedestal is as follows:

    "Ladimir Klacel

    Born April the 7th, 1808 in Ceske Trebove,

    passed away March the 17th, 1882 in Belle Plaine, Iowa.

    Encourage yourselves-to be philosophers.

    Erected by the Bohemians of Chicago, July 26th, 1885 to their wise and great man."

    It was really an impressive festival for our Bohemian metropolis. Thousands of people gathered at the unveiling of the monument of our great teacher, Ladimir Klacel. The festival committee was ...

    Bohemian
    II C, II B 1 c 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 12, 1885
    Friedrich Schiller

    The laying of the corner stone for the Schiller monument was an occasion, at which the Germans of Chicago showed how highly they esteem and honor the favorite poet of Germany, Friedrich Schiller...

    Mr. Julius Rosenthal, President of the Citizens Committee, said in his address: " The decision to erect a monument to the beloved of German poets was made by our German-American citizens of Chicago, September 24th, 1884. The Schwaben Society made the first step in this direction. The German population of this city was delighted with the project, and the necessary funds for the undertaking was subscribed in a very short time... "

    The following are excerpts from Mr.Wilhelm Rapp's address: "At the time of young Schiller's death, this country was still an unpopulated wilderness. Since then, it has developed into a great and free country. It is Schiller's country also, for he was the greatest of all poets devoted to freedom.

    2

    Just as Goethe's works breatned love for nature, so does Schiller's express love for freedom...Schiller is indispensable for us in America. The wonderful German spirit and the beautiful family devotion which he glorified in his poem "The Glocke" ( The Bell) shall help to retain in our children the German spirit in the midst of English surroundings..."

    The laying of the corner stone for the Schiller monument was an occasion, at which the Germans of Chicago showed how highly they esteem and honor the favorite poet of ...

    German
    II C, IV
  • L'italia -- April 23, 1887
    A Monument in Honor of Garibaldi in Chicago

    A monument in honor of Guiseppe Garibaldi will be erected by the Italians of Chicago, as a token of their love and esteem for their native land and its great hero and liberator. A sum of $1,300 to finance the memorial was collected at a celebration last February.

    The Italians of the large and growing colony will pay homage to the memory of the hero of two worlds who with his own hand led the country to freedom. That tribute of gratitude and affection, together with the most profound veneration that every Italian should have in his heart for Guiseppe Garibaldi, has received the able assistance of the Italians of New York who are taking an even more active part in American politics than are the Italians of Chicago.

    A monument in honor of Guiseppe Garibaldi will be erected by the Italians of Chicago, as a token of their love and esteem for their native land and its great ...

    Italian
    II C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 31, 1887
    [The Memorial Day]

    It is a beautiful custom to set aside one day, every year, to pay tribute to the memory of the men who gave their lives for this country. Our patriotically inspired citizens commemorated this day, yesterday, in a very becoming way. Yesterday's Memorial Day was marked by a special celebration of our German veterans. It was the unveiling of the monument dedicated by the German veterans, at St. Boniface Cemetery. The meeting place of the veterans and Catholic civil societies in front of the Staats Zeitung swarmed with people who joined the procession to the cemetery.

    A. C. Hesing, Washington Hesing, a number of the German Catholic clergy, the speakers and prominent veterans, and Edward Rumme, the mayor's representative from Lake View, took their places on the platform. The unveiling ceremonies over, A. C. Hesing, president of this celebration, gave the following address: "This monument which we dedicate today, has been erected by our Germans, thus honoring the heroes who have died for our great and free country. The unbroken courage of those fighters, not even wavering through years of hardship, can not find its equal on the recent battlefields of Europe. I do not mean to belittle the glory of the Germany army in France, but the services and accomplishments of our German volunteers to 2whom we pay tribute today, were equal to their glorious deeds. The memory of these fighters will by far outlive this solid granite monument erected in their honor."

    It is a beautiful custom to set aside one day, every year, to pay tribute to the memory of the men who gave their lives for this country. Our patriotically ...

    German
    III B 3 a, II B 2 d 1, III D, I F 5, II C, IV
  • Svenska Tribunen -- August 13, 1887
    A Statue of Karl von Linne

    A mass meeting was held on June 7th at Svea Hall to sondier a proposal to erect a statue in honor of Karl von Linne in Lincoln Park. The proposal was accepted with great enthusiasm, and the persons present appointed a committee of forty-five to handle the affair. The monument is going to be raised in the name of the Swedish-Americans in the United States and with their financial support.

    The committee elected the following as officers: President, John A. Enander, vice presidents: C.J.Sundell, Rob.Lindblom, P.M.Almin; P.S. Peterson, O.G.Lange, P.W.Nilson and A. Chaiser. Secretaries: L.Hasselroth, V.Tengwald, H.W.Brusewitz and C.Eklund, Treasurer, J.R.Lindgren, Fin. Sec. L.Widestrand.

    The General Committee made this appeal in The Swedish Tribune today:

    2

    "It has been suggested that the intended monument should be a copy of the one erected in Stockholm, Sweden a couple of years ago. About $40,000 is needed for the purpose. We, therefore, ask you, our countrymen, to co-operate with us.

    Linne' was a Swede of world-wide fame as a scientist. We Swedes in America should, therefore, honor him by erecting his statue in a place where men can seek rest after a busy day or week. Linne' gave to the world his beautiful truths of the life of the flowers. We, therefore, ask you for your contribution to enable us to erect this monument in Lincoln Park in Chicago. If 40,000 Swedish-Americans gave $1.00 each we would have the needed money in a couple of months.

    If someone should ask why the statue should be erected in Chicago we answer 3this: The largest Swedish colony is located in Chicago. Chicago is the most centrally located of all the large cities in the United States, and is the binding link between East and West, South and North,Chicago is the most cosmopolitan city in America. It is, therefore, most fitting that the statue should be raised here. The genius of Linne' was of such magnitude that he belongs to the whole world. ...

    A mass meeting was held on June 7th at Svea Hall to sondier a proposal to erect a statue in honor of Karl von Linne in Lincoln Park. The proposal ...

    Swedish
    II C, III A
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 12, 1888
    Fritz Reuter Monument.

    The "Low-German (Dialect) Society" held its semi-annual meeting night before last. J. J. Rumpf, who presided, rather severely criticized in his annual report the lukewarm attitude in regard to the erection of a monument for Fritz Reuter. He commended the "Swabian Society", which had achieved, with the cooperation of the Germans in Chicago, the erection of a beautiful monument for their favorite German, Friedrich von Schiller, at Lincoln Park, but said that the "Low-German Society" and its branches must admit being far behind in the materialization of their plans. Then he suggested the appointment of a committee to get in touch with other "Low-German Societies" for mutual assistance in executing the plan. He also suggested that the President of the Society should try to enthuse some journalists and speakers to take part in this cause for the cultivation of Low-German dialects, and to hold lectures under the auspices of the Society.

    The "Low-German (Dialect) Society" held its semi-annual meeting night before last. J. J. Rumpf, who presided, rather severely criticized in his annual report the lukewarm attitude in regard to the ...

    German
    II C, I C, III B 2, V A 1
  • Svenska Tribunen -- February 04, 1888
    The Linne' Monument Society.

    The interest in contributing to the fund for the erection of a statue to Linne' is steadily increasing. Many different societies in the middle west are working hard and with great enthusiasm for this purpose.

    Many societies are arranging lectures, concerts, balls, and bazaars and are taking in hundreds of dollars in admission fees.

    A meeting was held last Tuesday night with the committee of the Linne' Society. The chairman reported that he had held a conference with the Commissioners of Lincoln Park the other day concerning a place for the statue. It was decided that the greenhouse should be demolished and its place be given to the new monument among the flowers. A letter from sculptor Dyverman, Stockholm, Sweden, was read at the meeting. Dyverman offered to deliver to the committee models of the statue for 9,000 Swedish kronen, and the foundry factory, Meijer & Co., Stockholm offered to cast the whole monument in copper for 250,000 and in zinc for 10,000 Swedish kronen.

    After the letter was read the chairman said he did not think it necessary to raise the suggested 40,000 then. He thought that $28,000 should be enough. Several speakers said that no conclusion should be reached until there was at least $10,000 in the treasury of the fund.

    The interest in contributing to the fund for the erection of a statue to Linne' is steadily increasing. Many different societies in the middle west are working hard and with ...

    Swedish
    II C
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- May 14, 1888
    A Monument for Our Fallen!

    The Pioneer Aid and Support Society decided at its yesterday's meeting to erect a monument on the graves of our buried champions in Waldheim as soon as possible.

    An excursion to Sheffield, Indiana will be arranged for August 5th in order to raise the necessary funds.

    The Pioneer Aid and Support Society decided at its yesterday's meeting to erect a monument on the graves of our buried champions in Waldheim as soon as possible. An excursion ...

    German
    II C, I E