The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- April 17, 1883
    The Central Committee.

    The Central Committee held its meeting last night with Comrade W. Blum presiding. Concerning the wholesale murder at Braidwood, Comrade Spies reported that he took up contacts with various unions in order to induce all the workers to action in this highly important matter. The apathy which he encountered everywhere, however, had disheartened him. It was then moved and resolved to let this matter rest. Mr. Schwab reported that a certain Julius Mark presented the library with a number of valuable books. The delegates from different groups reported an increase of membership. The Bohemian delegates asked for advice concerning Bohemian Tailors and other shops employing girls 10-12 years of age, working 10-12 hours a day which means a systematic ruination for these children. (Advice was given). Resolved to send $15.00 to Comrade Justus Schwab of New York and urge the publication of the Communist Manifasto printed in English.

    The publication in German will commence this week. The elected officials are: August Spies, Secretary; Michel Schwab, librarian; Mittlacher was appointed auditor replacing the resigning Schernig. B. Rau replaces Rosenberg as a member of the agitation committee which will call a general meeting, with the purpose of officially discussing the relief money sent to Germany.

    The Central Committee held its meeting last night with Comrade W. Blum presiding. Concerning the wholesale murder at Braidwood, Comrade Spies reported that he took up contacts with various unions ...

    German
    I E, IV, I C, II B 2 g, II B 2 d 2, I H
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- April 12, 1884
    [Socialist Meeting]

    The General Committee of the I. A.A. held its regular meeting, presided by Comrade Kalbitz, yesterday evening.

    The minutes of last meeting were read and accepted. New delegates were received; From "Lehr and Wehrverein" A. Hirschberger; from the "North Side" Edward Schnaubelt and John Faist; from the "North West Side" Fricke and W. Blume. The Groups "Vorwarts" South West Side No. 1 and "Einigkeit" were not represented. Group South West side No. 2, has joined Group South West Side No. 3. The Groups "Nordseite" Bruderlichkeit"; Nordwestside," "Freiheit"; "Sudseit", "Sudwestseite No. 3"; "Bridgeport" and Town of Lake" report progress; also that the resolutions of the General Committees last meeting were approved. Group "Nordseite" celebrated its 2d anniversary, Saturday, May 17th, in the North Side Turnhall and invites all the other groups to this event. The surplus will be used for agitation purposes. Group "Freiheit" changed its location to 54 W. Lake Street (Greifs Hall) where an evening entertainment will be held on April 20th, to which all Comrades are invited.

    2

    The Agitation Committee reports that the pamphlets which threw light upon the "mistakes" of the workers convention was sent to Press and 5000 copies, to cost $20.00, will be printed. The librarian, Comrade Schwab, read a letter from Zurich, Switzerland, which states that several publications ordered by us, are on the way, and that in the near future a collection of revolutionary songs will be published and same are highly recommended to our attention.

    To acquire these books, $50 was appropriated. The present value of the library is $300. A proposition: To elect a committee to promote the arming of the people was accepted. Elected were Comrades Polling, Edward Schnaubelt, Hermann, Schroeder and Blume.

    The General Committee of the I. A.A. held its regular meeting, presided by Comrade Kalbitz, yesterday evening. The minutes of last meeting were read and accepted. New delegates were received; ...

    German
    I E, II B 2 d 2, III H, IV
  • Svornost -- September 16, 1884
    How the Americans Care for Chicago's Bohemians. We Are Infamous Heathens According to an American Missionary Society.

    EDITORIAL: There exists in our city an American missionary society. It published, not long ago, its first annual statement called, "First annual report of the Chicago City Missionary Society." This booklet has twenty pages with, at least, twenty infamous lies and calumnies about the Bohemians in Chicago. We do not like this kind of slander, and so much the less when it comes from the mouth of Ecclasiastical zealots, who boast that they are fighting evil with truth. We hope, anyhow, that the local public will be informed how our nationality has been unjustly offended, and what kind of crooked calumnies are spread among the religious masses about us. We must assert that their efforts are connected rather 2with the devil, than with God.

    On page 6 of this annual report, is given, by the superintendent of the missionary society, J. C. Armstrong, the first report on the Bohemians.

    "In the Lumbermen's Miesion, founded for workers of lumber-yards, a new field is opened for our society. This mission is located at the corner of 19th and Center Streets. In this district the religious services are held in French, German, Norwegian and English. One day in a week should be devoted to the Bohemians. A large number of Bohemians separated from the Catholic church have built in the neighborhood a beautiful infidel temple. This is the same spot where, in 1876, occured the revolt, and there have been, until now, elements there which played with dynamite. Those are the men, who are not afraid of God and do not care for the rights of other fellow human beings. It will be much cheaper, wiser and safer to go among them with the gospel, than to let them come to us with sword and fire. Our problem is to save them from eternal damnation, these desperate individuals who are connected with the vice of our city. This sacred mission is given to us, 3and what will be the answer to Him, who has sent us?"

    All that has been cited above is an infamous lie and malicious slander of the whole Bohemian community in this district and of the National Hall of the C.S.P.S. (Czechoslovak Benevolent Society), and of all the workingmen, who feed and fatten the churchmen. They lie when they say that the revolt of the workingmen, in 1877, started in National Hall and that National Hall is a seat of the so much feared dynamite throwers.

    It is further an absolute lie that Bohemians frequenting this hall, have no fear of God or consideration for their fellow human beings. All those societies, which have meetings in this hall, have the same mutual problems of encouraging fraternity amongst humans and of furnishing financial help to the needy. They are not, as the missionary report says, a bunch of desperados, connected with the city's worst element, whose sole purpose is crime. It is incredible how a superintendent of a 4missionary society is able to release such infamous lies from his devilish throat. His mouth anointed with sacred oils, Christ's blood and prayers, should be clean and veracious. How can he dare to bring the Gospel to these defamed and slandered Bohemian people, to preach his American morality with all this Pharisaism, thievery and knavery and to wish to convert them to his faith, a faith that has originated from the devil, himself.

    This superintendent's devilish mouth should not spread lies about his fellow-men, whom he does not know, and never has associated with. He believes only in spreading vile calumnies. He mixes christianity in his devilish saliva and believes that no one will know the difference. In this way he strives to poison our people and corrupt them to his level.

    The Chairman of the missionary society, Mr. C. F. Gates, a missionary himself, expresses a still worse opinion on the Bohemians living in this district. He writes on page 10, 5as follows: "You have heard about the committee organized by us for the purpose of establishing a McLeane Mission, called the "Lumbermen's Mission, at 683 Centre Ave. The committee's task was to find out the best ways to win for salvation the Bohemians, who are populating this district very densely. There is nothing done. We can see swarms of children running wild in the streets. We can see crowds of men leaving their dwellings and going to the meetings, to listen to the instigative speeches of the communistic and socialistic leaders. The only things that they learn at these meetings is to fight against God and the Church, against the law of possession, against the family's rules and social connections. When we consider, that their votes in the elections have the same worth as ours, we will understand the big value of our undertaking to penetrate those crowds with the light of the Holy Gospel.

    If we wish to be saved ourselves, we must try to save our children and in the name of our Master, under whose banner we are marching. We must walk through all 6the side streets of our city seeking for the lost ones, to save them with God's help.

    Brothers, why does God allow all those people from Bohemia, Italy, Germany, Holland, Norway, Denemark, England, Ireland, Holland, China and Japan to come independently, instead of delivering them straight into our hands so that we can show them the value and power of the Christian faith, as a developer of their body, morals and soul? It is a very expensive problem to send the missionaries to the remote countries, but when God is sending those pagans to our own door, we should seize the work in our own hands and we will not regret this at the day of judgment.

    As compensation for our missionary work we will have flocks of devoted men and women, who will go everywhere and distribute the bread of life and God's teaching. We need money for this purpose, we need money to change saloons into churches, and to decrease crime. If we had money to do this we would not need a big police force 7to keep order and we would save much money in this way.

    From these few words it is easy to see that the Chairman of the missionary society looks at the Bohemians of the 6th ward as heathens and abases them before the entire religious community. The whole prestige of the Bohemians being destroyed, the missionaries in their devilish hypocrisy will show their mercy and, collecting money from the rich Americans, will start to convert those uncultured, ignorant Bohemians from paganism. They would make out of us sly thieves and impostors, of the type that are always recruited from American clergymen. We read, almost every day in the newspapers, that they hang themselves, cut their throats, that some of them are put in jails, and some of them run away with their spoils to Canada, stolen money, collected through their people's faith in the Holy Gospel. Should the Bohemians be the same kind of pious Christians, should they deprive themselves of their honesty, good hearts, good name and model themselves after the American brothers.

    8

    You Pharisaic creatures come among these so called pagan Bohemians and they will teach you honesty, Christian love, toleration, humanity morality, temperance, and justice. You do not need to teach Bohemians these virtues, but rather you can learn these virtues from them, because all that you know now is the vices of crime, shame and infamy - even if you pray and stay in churches. We have recognized your infamy and this deterred us from attending your churches and services, which allow such thieves, impostors and libertines to be seen and honored as holy men; holy men that despise poor, honest workingmen; holy men, who, nevertheless, are willing to save these workingmen from paganism.

    You American Pharisees, who are hiding your vice and knavery in places that are meant for prayers, go among the Bohemians and learn how to pray simply but sincerely. If there was a country, which has had religion and may be too much of it, such a country was Bohemia, and starting with the middle ages Bohemia has been floded with religious teachings, religious practices, religious propaganda, and bloodshed for religion. The Bohemians have outgrown all that 9foolishness and they are not so low as to let themselves be the victims of your religion that attempts to implant devilishness into the hearts of our people. The Bohemians are outspoken. They will tell you all that they have in their hearts. Through the experience of many centuries the Bohemians have abandoned your type of religious practices, and even if you had whole regiments of missionaries sent into their midst these missionaries would not be able to change their human morals and doctrine of truth. These Bohemians would stand firm, like a wall that was once formed centuries ago by the Hussites, armed with clubs similar to those which were used to split the heads of the black monks, who came to Bohemia to preach hypocrisy, dishonesty and immorality, ready to do the same to these modern black monks of the missions.

    If these missionaries will come to the Bohemians to learn from them religion, morality and honesty, they will be welcome, but should they come with the intention to destroy the prosperity of our people, to insult us, to humiliate us unjustly, and then to rehabilitate us later, their enterprise would not pay at all.

    10

    I propose to the members of the missionary society, who intend to ensnare these ignorant Bohemians for the Methodist church on 19th Street that they explain and interpret to their representatives, how the Bohemians feel about it.

    They should enlighten their American representatives on how to talk with Bohemians. It is their duty to reprimand those Pharisaic slanders, and to revolk these wicked chairmen and superintendents of the mission, all of whom have thrown calumnies at us.

    In the future they should not write about the Bohemians, before they mingle with the Bohemians, and become acquainted with them. Further, they should never lie so unpardonably, and offend people that endeavor to build noble projects for the future.

    We are happy that Dr. Adam will visit Chicago in the near future. He knows 11us, loves us, protects us, and he will certainly take care, that all these slanders thrown on Bohemians by the religious fanatics be revoked and the good name of the Bohemians restored. The offended morality and feelings of the good and organized Bohemians in Chicago may instigate, unnecessarily, a justifiable revenge.

    The action of the Chicago Missionary Society, and of all those rascals who throw different calumnies on Bohemians in Chicago, is decidedly criminal in nature.

    EDITORIAL: There exists in our city an American missionary society. It published, not long ago, its first annual statement called, "First annual report of the Chicago City Missionary Society." This ...

    Bohemian
    I C, III C, I B 4, II D 6, II B 2 d 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 21, 1885
    [Early Efforts to Incorporate the German Language in the American Public Schools]

    The first groups of German immigrants came to America when Germany was in a state of poverty, desolation and demoralization, and therefore did not bring with them a lively interest for intellectual progress.

    There have been sporadic efforts by German teachers and preachers, who came from Germany to introduce German instruction permanently into American public schools. These efforts often failed, particularly during and after the American Civil War, 1860-1864, which engulfed the whole interest of the entire population in the United States.

    Finally in August 1880, a group of 170 German-American teachers founded the first German-American Teachers Association. The latter undertook the task of improving the whole American public school system parallel to German educational program, which was expressed subsequently, in a teachers' 2newspaper, the Deutsche Sohul Zeitung (German School Journal). Of course there have been many obstacles and enemies to the preservation of the German instruction, as shown by the recorded reports of German-American Teachers' Convention, which have been held annually.

    With all the ups and downs, experienced by the sponsors of the German instruction, the latter do not today present a very encouraging picture. Even today, most children of German parantage do not receive any German instruction. In fact, the mass of the population show no interest to speak of concerning the subject of educational problems, and particularly that of the German language, the preservation of which is confined to small groups of patriotic Germans. If the emigration keeps up from Germany, we shall dare to hope, that sometime in the future, the German-American elements will organize more solidly towards a happy future and permanent home for the German language in this country.

    The first groups of German immigrants came to America when Germany was in a state of poverty, desolation and demoralization, and therefore did not bring with them a lively interest ...

    German
    I A 1 b, II B 2 d 2, II A 1, I F 4, III G
  • Skandinaven -- January 21, 1887
    The Danish Pioneer

    The Danish Pioneer, published in Omaha, is by a decree forbidden in Denmark, and all copies entering Denmark through the mails will be confiscated. The reason is that the managing editor, Mark Hansen, is said to have insulted the King of Denmark in a series of articles, which he wrote.

    [Translator's note: Mark Hansen was a Chicago resident at that time, also Editor-in-chief and local editor.]

    The Danish Pioneer, published in Omaha, is by a decree forbidden in Denmark, and all copies entering Denmark through the mails will be confiscated. The reason is that the managing ...

    Danish
    II B 2 d 2, III H
  • Skandinaven -- January 21, 1887
    The Danish Pioneer

    The Danish Pioneer, published in Omaha, is by a decree forbidden in Denmark, and all copies entering Denmark through the mails will be confiscated. The reason is that the managing editor, Mark Hansen, is said to have insulted the King of Denmark in a series of articles, which he wrote.

    [Translator's note: Mark Hansen was a Chicago resident at that time, also Editor-in-chief and local editor.]

    The Danish Pioneer, published in Omaha, is by a decree forbidden in Denmark, and all copies entering Denmark through the mails will be confiscated. The reason is that the managing ...

    Danish
    II B 2 d 2, III H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 26, 1887
    [Pastor Hartmann Dead]

    Pastor Joseph Hartmann succumbed, yesterday, after a short illness, at the home of his daughter. The great loss is felt not only by his family but by his parishioners in whose welfare he was deeply interested. The poorer class has lost a faithful friend and helper, the Evangelical Church of America one of its most prominent representatives, and the city of Chicago a noble citizen. Pastor Hartmann was born September 18th, 1823 at Bornheim in the Bavarian Rheinpfalz. Showing a very keen intellect, in his youth, the clerical profession was chosen for him and he soon entered the Latin School at Speyer for the intended educacation. Later he attended the college at Zweibrucken and had the distinction of being its model student. He studied philosophy and theology at the Universities of Bonn and Utrecht in Holland, in both of which he soon was recognized as an excellent orator and chosen by the latter student body as its president and official speaker. Showing distinctly his partisanship during the year 1848, he knew that Germany wouldn't require his services and therefore, decided with his young wife, Eva, to make America a future home. The officials of the United Synod at Cleveland examined and ordained him. His first position 2was at Constableville, New York, and he was worshipped by the members of the community. In 1851 he was called to St. Paul's Evangelical Community of Chicago, to succeed the Pastor, Dr. Fischer, arriving at his post November 18th, 1851. His brilliant sermons were so magnetic, that the little church soon proved too small for so many hundreds of people anxious to attend services on Sunday. The result was that in 1854 a big and beautiful church, the first to be built of brick in Chicago, replaced the little church. Soon this church also proved too small and he began, with that admirable energy of his, to build schools on the south west and the west sides and, later, even began to build independent communities. Pastor Hartmann contributed greatly to the development of the Evangelical church in the west, and consecrated not less than forty two churches. At the outbreak of the Civil War Pastor Hartmann was one of the first to defend from the pulpit, and also in the periodical Der Hansfreund which he managed, the abolition of slavery and the cause of the union. To soften the heart ache caused by the death of members of the immediate family, he took a trip to Europe financed by members of the community and participated at the dedication of the Luther monument at Worms. After his return to this country, he erected an orphan's home known as the Uhlich Orphan's 3Home. The funds used were from the generous legacy of Mr. Uhlich. THe great fire of 1871 destroyed his church and home also, but the height of his suffering was reached in March, 1873, when his highly intellectual daughter, Amanda, met with an untimely death. Pastor Hartmann celebrated on November 18th, 1876, his 25th anniversary as Pastor of St. Paul's community. This celebration was attended by a multitude of people from all over the country. With the year 1885 his health began to decline and the community, which felt so indebted to him, granted him a handsome pension. His death was a heavy blow to all of us

    Pastor Joseph Hartmann succumbed, yesterday, after a short illness, at the home of his daughter. The great loss is felt not only by his family but by his parishioners in ...

    German
    IV, II B 2 d 2, II D 4, III C, III H, I H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 20, 1891
    The German American Library.

    The "Germania Male Chorus", which has done much in the last year to further German interests, now appears with a new plan, which is so exceptionally laudable, that it will not fail to arouse lively interest throughout all German-American circles. The association proposes nothing less, than the founding of a German-American library. However, as the following two letters give full details about this splendid idea, we publish them herewith, without comment.

    "Germania Male Chorus. Chicago, April 15, 1891. To Messrs. Joseph Baucker, Washington Hesing and Frederick Hild. Gentlemen! The club's secretary will probably have given you notice in regard to your nomination as members of the Library Committee, so it may not be necessary to recapitualte here, except that I had a special purpose in mind, when I suggested your names to the Board of Executives of the Germania Maennerchor (Male Chorus).

    As you know, for a year the Germania has subscribed to the principle, that a powerful, German-American club like ours, has a higher task to fulfill, than to function merely as an assembly which satisfies the social demands of its members, 2and this motto is not only found in our support of art during the grand artistic club productions, but includes our participation in all branches of the club's activity. According to my opinion, we now have an exceptional opportunity, by founding a club library. It is evident of course, that our goal cannot be a general race with the large book collections of the land. However, we have a good chance in achieving something, in so far as we may try to fill the large gaps in the American libraries and, at the same time, we function in conformance with the ideal sense of a German-American club.

    I need not tell you, that in the history of the Germans in the United States, from the very first period of its colonization until the present day, many a pearl of intellectuality lays scattered about, which will be doomed to oblivion if not properly gathered and preserved. As far as I know, no such attempt has ever been made, namely, to make a collection of all the literature in our language, which has been published in the United States, from the first days of the German immigration to the present era; at least in the west, no such work has ever been performed, or satisfactorily accomplished. In regard to the attainments of the German daily newspapers, all their noteworthy deeds for the perpetuation of our customs and language, however valuable they have been and always will be, such an edition we 3cannot include at present at least, because of its voluminous size. But it is within the realm of possibility to procure everything, which the German mind has conceived in this land and put into book form, this we may gather little by little and so preserve it for posterity. Aside from the great historical value of such a collection, it has a tendency to convince the German-American about the spiritual importance of his element, it will strengthen him in his competitive endeavors with other people, by giving him that necessary self respect.

    The administration is prepared to supply you with the necessary means for the realization of this work, and awaits your valued reply, whether you consider this briefly described plan as feasible and desirable, also, if you are willing to participate in your capacity as member of the committee.

    Very respectfully, Harry Rubens, President."

    To this communication the following reply was received: "Chicago, Ill. April 16, 1891. To the President of the Germania Maennerchor, Harry Rubens. Esteemed Sir! Your valuable letter reached me, today, and I hasten to inform you, that I am not only 4pleasedto co-operate, as befits the duties of the chairman of the library committee concerning which I have notified the club's secretary, but it gives me extraordinary pleasure to do my very best, to help realize your idea, the procurement of a specifically German-American library in our club.

    The German-American is unaware of his full importance regarding the past and is not sufficiently conversant with his cultural political problems of the present. The latter belongs to the German-American press. In order to bring the glorious past to his knowledge, he will find it is imperative to peruse history, but to successfully conclude such a study without the help of a large library is unthinkable. The accomplished German-American historian, H. A. Rattermann (German-American Magazine, folio 4, page 515) remarks: "To speak is silver, but silence is golden!" A well known proverb..... We have been silent until all the gold and silver in history has been distributed to all the others and we remain with empty hands. Yet, golden were the German deeds when the cultural development of this land is considered.... It is time.... we should speak of our achievements as German-Americans....until history gives us our deserved recognition...

    5

    Very well, we shall not only speak of the accomplishments of our forefathers, we shall garner them for the present and preserve them for the future.....From private collections....among dealers of antiquities...from publishers.... by appeals to the German press to support our cause,.... with the assistance of Mr. Hesing nad Mr. Hild as committee members,.... by asking for advice and suggestions of such eminent German-American historians as Oswald, Seidensticker, Rattermann, G. Koerner, just to mention a few,....we gladly labor for the beginning of the great work which you visualized and created.... Very respectfully Joseph Brucker."

    The "Germania Male Chorus", which has done much in the last year to further German interests, now appears with a new plan, which is so exceptionally laudable, that it will ...

    German
    II B 2 a, II B 2 d 1, II B 2 d 2, II B 2 d 3, II B 1 a, III A, III F
  • Abendpost -- May 08, 1891
    New German Weekly Magazine.

    The first edition of a new German weekly magazine called the National News and edited by Joseph Brucker and Paul Haedike was published yesterday. The new magazine which is very attractive in more ways than one has rather a questionable thesis, it states that the "Fatherland" can only be saved by the Republican Party. It contains many good essays and very carefully selected articles from "American" and Europeon newspapers.

    The "Abendpost" management wishes the editors good luck and success as they have always proved good fighters for the Germans of America.

    The first edition of a new German weekly magazine called the National News and edited by Joseph Brucker and Paul Haedike was published yesterday. The new magazine which is very ...

    German
    II B 2 d 2, III A
  • Abendpost -- September 19, 1891
    Vorwarts (Forward)

    True to its name, the athletic club Forward is steadliy advancing.

    Now it is publishing a monthly magazine and a copy of the first issue is before us. The title of their publication is likewise Forward.

    It is written for intelligent Germans.

    Appearance and contents are first class.

    True to its name, the athletic club Forward is steadliy advancing. Now it is publishing a monthly magazine and a copy of the first issue is before us. The title ...

    German
    II B 2 d 2, II B 3