The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Abendpost -- March 04, 1907
    Carl Schurz Memorial Society.

    The National Carl Schurz Memorial Society, which was formed soon after the death of the famed German-American, and which has its main office in New York with branches in Chicago, St. Louis, Milwankee, Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia, and Boston has just given details of their plans.

    The first is the erection of a memorial to the value of $250,000 of which $40,000 have been signed for by some friends of the deceased. The society however will not stop with the erection of the dead statue of stone, but will act in the spirit of the dead by effective agitation of the civil service system, a movement of Which the dead was the chief for many years, the development of the German movement in the United States of America of which Mr. Schurz was a busy agitator as President of the German Museums Society, the Harvard University and Vice President of the German Society of New York.

    2

    The permanent retention of his name in Hampton, which is dedicated to the volution of two races, for which he has worked officially and privately during his lifetime, was especially sponsored by the executive committee. In Hampton, Carl Schurz, as Secretary of the Interior made his first successful experiments with the education of the Indians, which led to the present system of government schools with their civilized influence. It was his wish in the last years of his life to contribute to a proper installment of such institution and it is the plan of this society to accomplish these wishes. The former American ambassador at the English Court, Joseph H. Choate is the Chairman and the Banker, Isaac N. Seligman, is the Secretary of the National Society. Mr. Wilhelm Bocke is Chairman and Mr Otto E. Schneider, Secretary of the Chicago branch. The Milwaukee branch will erect a memorial themselves and after completion they will participare on the National movement in honor of Carl Schurz. The Society will also honor Schurz's activity for the development of the Negro and Indian races by the erection of a suitable building or in other suitable manner in the institution of Hampton, Va.

    The National Carl Schurz Memorial Society, which was formed soon after the death of the famed German-American, and which has its main office in New York with branches in Chicago, ...

    German
    II C, III B 2, III B 3 a, II B 2 b, I J
  • Dziennik Związkowy -- August 01, 1908
    Let Us Promote Knowledge (Editorial)

    Sunday, tomorrow, as an annual custom of the Polish National Alliance, the Library and Museum are arranging a summer outing, the so - called picnic. The proceeds are designated for the purchase of new books, and to increase the collections in the museum. This institution of knowledge is controlled by the Central Board of the P.N.A. and renders priceless service in all communities, especially in Chicago. If some of our readers would visit the Alliance Library, they would see the many persons reading Polish writings and books without charge to them. The Library is not supported by special donations from philanthropists who contribute liberally to educational causes; neither does it possess special funds, nor demand financial assistance of conventions of the P.N.A. However, it unfolds the functions of its financial support, which comes mostly from Polish citizens of Chicago, in a splendid manner. The Library and its collections in the Museum are an honor to all members of the P.N.A. It was founded by the late Dr. Kalusowski of Washington, an upright man and a great patriot who saw enlightenment, in the future, of those people who are of Polish birth. This Library grew from its modest beginning to considerable strength; and, we can boldly say, is today, the largest and best equipped Polish Library in America.

    2

    The development of our Library can be credited to the good will of our brethren of the P.N.A. in Chicago, who sincerely assisted its growth, through concerts and outings; obtaining therefrom funds to increase its size and strength from year to year until, today, this Library contains six- thousand select works, which are principally by Polish authors; besides these, it contains a liberal collections of English, French, Lithuanian, German, Latin, Italian, Russians and Spanish works. The Library also shelteres the splendid National Museum, containing a valuable collection of relics. There are letters written by Polish kings and prominent men before and after the partition of Poland; there are beautiful photographs of famous heroes of Polish insurrections, maps, statues, medals, pictures, hand paintings, precious stones, and a splendid numismatic collection of Polish coins, from the time of Boleslaw Chrobry, to the present day. The Library is conveniently located in a room of the P.N.A., 102-104 W. Division Street and is operated by a librarian and custodian. The daily average of persons reading Polish, European, and American literature, is about 50; books are loaned, each month, to about 3,000 persons. This treasure of knowledge is entirely dependant upon the good will of its community. A special commission, or department, which has jurisdiction of the Library and its collection of relics, also the collection funds for new works, is appointed by 3the Central Board of the P.N.A., at each convention. Thanks are due to the advocators of knowledge, who donate several hundred volumes each year. The funds, as we have previously stated, are raised by arranging - evening socials, concerts, picnics, other entertainments; contributions are also accepted.

    Our institution is sincerely enjoying the support of the community, which is shown by the large attendance of Poles and non - members of the P.N.A. Money derived from these entertainments replenishes the treasury of the Library. So this year, as has been the custom in other years, directors of the Library are arranging a picnic and are hoping that our community will remember this temple of knowledge, by giving financial aid to this worthy cause. Every book acquired by this Library is another torch light of knowledge. So, dear countrymen, do not forget that it is your sacred duty to support this treasure, morally, and materially!

    American people donate millions for educational purposes, knowing that in progress lies the strength of the Nation. Therefore, let us follow their example by laying our contributions on the altar of knowledge; surely, we will not regret it! Let our countrymen attend the picnic in large numbers, on August 2nd, and 4add a stone to the foundation of enlightenment; a cause that will serve pleasant memories. We appeal to you, and solicit the attendance of all members of the P.N.A., at this picnic, to rejoice in the fact that we will receive the benefit of the vast store of knowledge, that we helped make this great educational institution a grand reality in Chicago.

    Sunday, tomorrow, as an annual custom of the Polish National Alliance, the Library and Museum are arranging a summer outing, the so - called picnic. The proceeds are designated for ...

    Polish
    II B 2 a, II B 2 b, III B 2, I A 1 a, II B 1 c 3
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- September 11, 1908
    New Polish Catholic Hospital

    Work on the new Polish Catholic hospital has begun. It will be named the "Franciscan Sisters'," and will cost $50,000. This new section will be adjoining the old building located at 365 Ridge Avenue. This became necessary when many patients were seeking admittance to this hospital, but the old structure was not large enough to accommodate these people. This hospital is located on the shores of Lake Michigan.

    The biggest share of the funds were donated by Polish Catholic churches in Chicago, the rest was given by well-to-do business men of Evanston.

    During this time the second conference was held in regard to building the new Polish Catholic University of St. Ignatz, which is quietly progressing forward. This is proof that the Polish Catholic people are doing everything possible to expand the Roman-Catholic religion in Chicago and the surrounding towns.

    Work on the new Polish Catholic hospital has begun. It will be named the "Franciscan Sisters'," and will cost $50,000. This new section will be adjoining the old building located ...

    Polish
    II D 3, II B 2 b, III C
  • Dziennik Związkowy -- January 25, 1909
    Polish People's University

    Lectures for the week of January, 24, to 30th:

    Sunday, 3 p.m. in the hall of Park No. 1, Noble and Chicago Aves: Technical Improvements, K. Szymanski, C. E. at 8:30 p. m.

    Tuesday: Evolution of the Earth - Dr. Czaki.

    Wednesday: Geography - J. Kochanowicz.

    Thursday: Evolution of the Earth - Dr. Czaki.

    Friday: Geography: J. Kochanowicz

    Dr. Jul. Szymanski, Sec. P.P.U.

    Lectures for the week of January, 24, to 30th: Sunday, 3 p.m. in the hall of Park No. 1, Noble and Chicago Aves: Technical Improvements, K. Szymanski, C. E. at ...

    Polish
    II B 2 b, II B 2 g, I A 3, IV
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- April 08, 1909
    (No headline)

    "To Jews, especially, this exhibition should be of great interest," Mr. Lipsky explained to a reporter of the Jewish Courier. "This should particularly be of interest to our newly immigrated brethren. The main purpose is to draw the attention of the public to the life and activities that go on in the far and wide regions of the West, and the opportunities one can get by going away from the large and densely populated American cities, and to look for a place to settle where the opportunities for betterment are much brighter."

    Mr. Lipsky thinks that this exhibition would do much good for the Jewish masses, and he hopes that it would be visited by all Jews in Chicago.

    "To Jews, especially, this exhibition should be of great interest," Mr. Lipsky explained to a reporter of the Jewish Courier. "This should particularly be of interest to our newly immigrated ...

    Jewish
    II B 2 b
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- April 08, 1909
    Great Exhibition at the Hebrew Institute Mr. Harry Lipsky Wants to Acquaint the Jewish Public of Chicago with the Riches and Life of a Large Area of the United States All Are Expected

    To acquaint the Jewish masses of this city with the development of commerce and industry of the West, and to show the steps one must take in order to work oneself up, is the last plan to be carried out at the Hebrew Institute. The creator of this plan is Mr. Harry Lipsky, the associated superintendent of the institution. Mr. Lipsky is arranging an exhibition for which he is gathering numerous pictures representing in graphic form the wealth of the various states in the West, and he will be there to explain to the visitors the meaning of these pictures.

    2

    In this undertaking Mr. Lipsky received the cooperation of the large publishing houses, most of the railroad companies, mine owners, manufacturers, and farmers, and from all those who have been closely connected with the rapid growth of the wealthy regions in the country.

    Most of the pictures, and valuable materials linked with them, necessary to make this exhibition a success, have already been collected by Mr. Lipsky, and in several days an announcement will be made when the opening will take place.

    The exhibition at the Hebrew Institute will be called: "Industrial and Educational Museum." Through the pictures, maps, and literary works which are being gathered for this occasion, each visitor will get some idea of the activities and life of the Americans in the West, as well as to get a glimpse into the lives of those who live in the new states of Texas, Oklahoma, Colorado, Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana. The visitor will be shown, among other things, the development of various industries, such as horticulture, sugar plantations, cattle raising and modern farming.

    To acquaint the Jewish masses of this city with the development of commerce and industry of the West, and to show the steps one must take in order to work ...

    Jewish
    II B 2 b
  • Lietuva -- September 03, 1909
    There Are One Hundred Lithuanian Organizations in Chicago

    According to latest statistics, there are at least one hundred Lithuanian organizations in Chicago. That is a fairly large number, compared to the size of the Lithuanian population. But of what benefit are these organizations to our people? A study of the character of a majority of the Lithuanian organizations will more or less reveal the character of the majority of the Lithuanians of Chicago.

    The Lithuanian population of Chicago in large enough to establish and very easily support at least one daily Lithuanian newspaper, and a good school with a library and national museum, but we still stand very far away from the realization of these aspirations. Furthermore, we do not have even one Lithuanian book in the Chicago public library; a number of less numerous nationalities such as the Japanese, Czechs, French, and Russians, have many 2of their own books in the public library. It does not cost anything to introduce Lithuanian books into the library. In order to do that, all that is necessary is for our societies to send a petition signed by their members to the librarians, who will purchase a number of Lithuanian books with public funds. It appears, however, that our societies are not much interested in the educational uplift of our people.

    Recently a movement was launched to build a Chicago Lithuanian community hall; and what happened? As in all other efforts to accomplish something worth-while, the above proposal precipitated many disagreements and enmities. The members of the movement were split in half, and it now appears to be a lost cause.

    When our priests learned that non-Catholics were planning to build a community hall, they immediately went to work and built a church hall, together with a parochial school. In that way the need of the Catholic societies for a community hall was satisfied; they have no need for another hall and for that 3reason will not support the efforts of the association of Chicago Lithuanian Societies to build a community hall that would suit the needs of all Lithuanian factions.

    Nevertheless, the non-Catholic societies can still realize their aim, without the aid of Catholic organizations, if they will only unite and work together. But they refuse to unite, and as a result we now have two non-Catholic associations of Chicago Lithuanian societies; later on there may be more, because that is the way of our life.

    According to latest statistics, there are at least one hundred Lithuanian organizations in Chicago. That is a fairly large number, compared to the size of the Lithuanian population. But of ...

    Lithuanian
    I C, II B 2 d 1, II B 2 a, II B 2 b, II D 6, I A 2 a, III C, III A, V A 2
  • Dziennik Związkowy -- July 23, 1910
    Library and Reading Room of Polish National Alliance a Great Treasure (Editorial)

    The library and reading room of the Polish National Alliance are cherished as great treasures by Polish readers. That treasure of knowledge is conveniently located in the P.N.A. building, next to the Polish National Museum. Reports of the library commission show that within one month 1,572 books were rented to 808 persons, while 660 persons made use of the reading room. The library and the adjacent museum were visited by 62 guests and favored with numerous donations in the form of books and precious antiquarian collections.

    Although under the control of the P.N.A., the library and museum are sustained by their own powers and facilities, which owe their care to the solicitude of a special committee, appointed by the central board of the P.N.A., who manage those joint and kindred institutions. In a truly conscientious pursuance of its duty, that special committee cares for the funds which are used for the purchase of new books, bindings and repairs, also for new collections of natural, scientific and literary value, together with the free offerings, and donations from patrons of the library and the reading room. This committee also arranges for excursions and concerts, the proceeds of which are added to the fund.

    The library and reading room of the Polish National Alliance are cherished as great treasures by Polish readers. That treasure of knowledge is conveniently located in the P.N.A. building, next ...

    Polish
    II B 2 a, II B 2 b, III B 2
  • Dziennik Związkowy -- August 08, 1910
    Picnic for the Benefit of the Polish National Alliance, Library and Museum

    A grand picnic was held yesterday for the benefit of the Polish National Alliance Library and Museum. Three special trains brought about 1,500 persons to the park. The park, however, was not overcrowded, as has been the case on previous occasions, therefore, there was sufficient space to accomodate all.

    The program was arranged by the committee to the complete satisfaction of all. The young element and also the older people enjoyed themselves, dancing to the tunes of a first class orchestra. In another section of the park, stands for refreshments were conveniently located.

    Friends and acquaintances were camping in great numbers on the bank of the stream which flows through the park. Contests, races, and various other games were also part of the program. One group of picnickers left the grounds at 7 p.m., the last group left on the 9 p.m. train.

    Although tired, all returned in good spirits with pleasant memories of an excellent time; and there is no doubt, all enjoyed a well earned sleep.

    A grand picnic was held yesterday for the benefit of the Polish National Alliance Library and Museum. Three special trains brought about 1,500 persons to the park. The park, however, ...

    Polish
    II B 2 a, II B 2 b, II B 1 c 3, III B 2, II B 3
  • Narod Polski -- September 28, 1910
    (No headline)

    Not long ago we called the attention of our Polish politicians,to political clubs that in order to gain more influence in local and national politics, it is necessary to have such clubs, not the kind which pass the collection bag before the election, but the kind that would act as a school.

    In our circumstances politics should be conducted in a different way. Germans, Swedes, and Irish distinguish themselves by becoming citizens as soon as possible and joining one of the political parties, either one or the other.

    State, county and ward clubs of those nationalities know very well what goes on and how strong they are; if they are not sure of winning they compromise with so-called (by them) foreign voters, with the result that they come out victorious.

    We are different. Our people, due to laziness, neglect to study the 2language of the country, and only those apply for citizen papers who lose their jobs in the factories on account of not having them.

    The citizens of other nationalities read newspapers and know what is going on in politics. They know the principles of all parties and do not neglect political campaigns. On the contrary, our people have no idea about politics and care still less for citizenship; therefore very little attention is paid to "foreigners" by the politicians, if they do, it is only when they need their votes for the election of their candidates; for that they throw us a bone by giving us some insignificant job.

    The cause of this evil is the lack of well organized clubs through which our people could enlighten themselves about political matters. Such clubs should also teach English and prepare our people for citizenship. It is true that such action is connected with some expense, but this would be willingly covered by those who would like to become citizens and take 3part in American life.

    We have only one such club in Chicago, and that is in St. Adalbert's parish. We do not know of any other Polish political clubs.

    Politics play a very important part in Chicago and for that reason we should take an active part.

    Not long ago we called the attention of our Polish politicians,to political clubs that in order to gain more influence in local and national politics, it is necessary to have ...

    Polish
    I F 2, I C, I A 3, III A, II B 2 b