The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Svenska Nyheter -- May 12, 1903
    Charity Social by Swedish National Association

    The charity social which was held last Sunday at North Side Turner Hall under the auspices of the Swedish National Association was attended by a large crowd. The income from the social is to go to the fund for the legal defense of John Nordgren. The program was opened by Mr. Sigurd Meck's Orchestra, which also played for the dance at the closing of the social.

    The first speaker of the evening was Mr. Axel Ahlstedt, who spoke for fifteen minutes on the topic, "Justice and Truth." The speech was thoughtful and clear. Mr. Nordgren's attorney, Mr. W. S. Elliott, junior, gave an extended speech, describing in detail the occurrences in Mr. Nordgren's 2family life. He spoke with a warmth that even the dance-loving group of young people became interested..... Mr. Elliott had been introduced-by Mr. C. J. Erickson in a speech given in English.

    The Chicago Sextette gave four numbers.....Mrs. Ellen Graf executed a modern polka, in her well-known smiling and pleasant manner; our charming baritone, Mr. Brusell, presented "Ljungsby Horn." Mr. Carl Liljegren ably presented Wilhelm von Braun's "My Double," and our ever appreciated singing director, Ernest Lindblom, afterwards sang Figaro's aria from the "Barber of Seville."

    The second part of the program consisted of the one-act play "He is not 3Jealous." The doctor in the play, "August Walter," was impersonated by the director of the Swedish Theatrical Society, Mr. Christ Brusell.... "Amanda" (his wife) was played by Mrs. Ellen Graf. Mr. Carl Liljegren played the role of "Proprietor Borgstrom," and Mr. Fred Bolling played as the trusted servant, "Herman."

    Even if we were to try, we would not be able to point to any one of the players as one who excelled all other actors in the play. All of the actors, so to speak, lived their roles, and the actor or actress who understands his or her role, and presents it as faithfully as circumstances permit, will always win the applause of the public. And thus was the 4occasion Sunday evening.

    Those who appeared on the program gave their services free of charge, so that one may expect the amount gained through this charity-social to be large.

    The charity social which was held last Sunday at North Side Turner Hall under the auspices of the Swedish National Association was attended by a large crowd. The income from ...

    Swedish
    II D 7, II B 1 c 2, II B 1 c 1, II B 1 a
  • Svenska Nyheter -- September 29, 1903
    Swedish National Dance Club

    The Swedish National Dance Club is the name of a society organized last week in this city. The purpose of the Club is to revive, the old quick folk dances which have been nearly forgotten in our day. From this point of view of both picturesqueness and health these old dances are preferable to the modern dances.

    Mr. Fred Bolling is the founder of the Club and the director of dancing. He is very well trained for his task. Practice takes place every Thursday evening at the Club's hall at 82 Siegel Street. All young ladies and gentlemen interested in this activity are invited to the practice sessions.

    The Swedish National Dance Club is the name of a society organized last week in this city. The purpose of the Club is to revive, the old quick folk dances ...

    Swedish
    II B 1 c 2
  • Svenska Nyheter -- February 14, 1905
    [Philochoros Club]

    The Philochoros Club gave a very successful entertainment at the Three Links' Club House last Saturday evening. The program was varied, with music and songs; folk dances under the direction of Professor Fred Bollings.

    The Philochoros Club gave a very successful entertainment at the Three Links' Club House last Saturday evening. The program was varied, with music and songs; folk dances under the direction ...

    Swedish
    III B 2, II B 1 c 2
  • Svenska Nyheter -- June 27, 1905
    Around the Maypole

    From the early morning 'till late in the evening when the god of thunder hitched his bucks to his two-wheeled carriage, and Jupiter Pluvius started laying sinister plans for the drenching of all of us without further ceremonies, the ruler of the weather was in brilliant humor and sent rich measure of his gifts to the children of men. Owing to his good humor, those many thousands of our compatriots who had met at Elliott Park to participate in the celebration of the long, luminous night, enjoyed the festivities thoroughly, imbibing from the cup of joy even as they drank their friend Ogren's foaming mjod and his unseemly expensive lemonade. But when the heavy clouds began to line up in the sky, the thunder rumbled from afar, and rain began to moisten the earth, then the sounding of the bells took another tune. But that did not happen 'till eleven o'clock that night.

    2

    About the middle of the day, when the people had satisfied their craving for food, and red wine and other drinks had moistened their dried-up throats, the official part of the celebration started. The Swedish Singing Association had taken their places on the great stage when Uncle Old entered to give the greeting of Welcome to all the visitors. Afterwards, "Du gamla, du friska" (Thou Old Yet Vigorous Ones) was played, and the "Star Spangled Banner," "Hear Us, Svea," and "Hail to the Lofty North" were sung. Then the American and the Swedish flags were raised aloft on the Maypole, and Mr. C. R. Chindblom gave a thoughtful, appealing oration on behalf of the American flag.

    Then it was the turn of the justly praised Attorney, G. Bernhard Anderson. Upon his appearance on the platform, he was greeted with vigorous applause. In an enthusiastic, (we are tempted to say, "fanatic") speech of praise and devotion to our old homeland, he paid his respects to the blue and yellow banner, "....the symbol of liberty, of high honor, and of loyalty." The 3speaker concluded his speech with a wish of long life to the little country so far up north; the audience gave their hurrahs, hats and handkerchiefs were wafted high, and the boys joined in singing "Vart land."

    A veritable storm of applause rewarded the singers, and it could not be stopped until a da capo was given. The extraordinarily beautiful and manly sounding melody....was very effective. The powerful bassos were well-modulated, and the execution, excellent in every detail, was worthy of every praise. The whole chorus has proven itself to be a gathering of really outstanding, intelligent individuals, with the precise, sure, and distinct training the men have undergone, they are able to present something really extraordinary in the field of the male chorus. The musical gems enjoyed by the audience at the Maypole will not soon be forgotten.

    At 2:30 P.M. competition in sports made demand upon the men and women; high jumping, distance jumping, and running. We had the chance to see fat and 4lean fellow-citizens jumping and running as if life was at stake. Endless, almost, was the glee as the broadly built matrons came waddling on, puffing and perspiring and laughing.

    The folk dances conducted by the Philo-chorus Society were very pleasing, and the public indicated its appreciation of the ancient, honorable dances by vigorous applause. Watching a group of people folk-dancing is invariably enjoyable. No black formal clothes, no white shining shirt fronts - only joyous and fresh colors which appeal to our eyes.

    Of course, everything went on vigorously and with speed, and with a sure rhythm such as only the members of the Philo-chorus Society can dance.

    5

    The girls participating in these dances were sweet and appealing so that it was a pleasure to watch them. Long live the Philo-chorus Society. Miss Edith Danielson, 5951 Chicago Avenue, was elected the midsummer bride.

    Wherever one went in the park, places of attraction met the eye. There were galleries where one's photograph could be had for ten cents; there were ice-cream stands without end; there were lottery automats where chewing-gum could be won; there were shooting galleries where valiant warriors were firing; there were carousels and restaurants, and last but not least, beautiful shaded spots where a tired youth could sit, calmly smoking, while watching the amusements and his little girl friend.

    The festival was attended by about 20,000 people, not 15,000 as Record Herald states. As is well known, the owner of the paper mentioned is very friendly toward the Norwegians, and it was probably for this reason that his reporters wrote that the attendance at the festival was smaller than usual, since "the 6Norwegians, due to the dissolution of the union, stayed away." We have never met a Norwegian at these mid-summer festivals, but last Sunday we saw 4,000 more Swedes at Elliott Park than we have seen there any time before.

    From the early morning 'till late in the evening when the god of thunder hitched his bucks to his two-wheeled carriage, and Jupiter Pluvius started laying sinister plans for the ...

    Swedish
    II B 1 c 3, II B 1 c 2, II B 1 a, I C, IV
  • Svenska Nyheter -- October 31, 1905
    Folk Dances

    The well-known dance club, Philochoros, founded to interpret the national dances of old Sweden for the Swedish-Americans will give a dance exhibition on Saturday, November 11, at the old Spelz Hall. A number of our beautiful national dances will be executed by members of the society.

    The well-known dance club, Philochoros, founded to interpret the national dances of old Sweden for the Swedish-Americans will give a dance exhibition on Saturday, November 11, at the old Spelz ...

    Swedish
    II B 1 c 2
  • Svenska Nyheter -- November 14, 1905
    Philochorus Club Holds Dance

    Last Saturday, the Philochorus club held its annual dance at Spelz Hall, and at the same occasion staged an exhibition of Swedish national dances. The dance, as expected, proved a great success. What display of colors as these young people, in national costumes, entered the stage, group after group, and then started an Ostgoth polka. What a beautiful vision must have been presented in Old magnificent Sweden when the vigorous, lively youth of that country were the costumes of old. The colors in these clothes might be considered an artistic blending of the opulent flora in our old country, and the tailoring does honor to the spirit of the North. A Swedish nation clothed in the national costumes of Sweden never could become backward. It would be as impossible as to be weeping in sunshine when there is no heaviness of heart.

    2

    The festival of the evening was, as we have said, magnificent. Vigor and grace characterized the whole. How the boys danced! They stood on their hands, on their heads, rarely on their feet for one of their feet was almost constantly making figures in the air. Then, all at once it seemed as if the whole crowd was on wings, the whole circle became a gigantic turn wheel. And then with a jump, the whole throng stood there absolutely still, as if they were a troop of soldiers at the command "Halt". - And the girls!-

    Things were indeed lively Saturday evening. When one espies so many youths overflowing with gladness and joy, and listens to old-time quaint dance music that calls to life again dormant memories,then the joy of living quite automatically takes possession of one's soul.

    3

    The Philochorists deserve our gratitude for having fanned a fresh breeze, warm with sunshine, into our minds.

    Last Saturday, the Philochorus club held its annual dance at Spelz Hall, and at the same occasion staged an exhibition of Swedish national dances. The dance, as expected, proved a ...

    Swedish
    II B 1 c 2
  • Svenska Tribunen -- February 06, 1906
    Swedish Folk Dancers Touring America (Summary)

    The Swedish traditions cannot be preserved by singing folk songs alone; neither will the old folk dances be no less effective as has lately been demonstrated in Sweden. In our opinion, no other foreign country could be as receptive to a touring group of Swedish folk dancers than America, where hundreds of thousands of Swedes live.

    The announcement in this issue is an appeal to Swedish-Americans to familiarize themselves with an almost forgotten art among them. There is also a suggesstion that groups be organized to learn and preserve the folk dances here, and present them as a Swedish tradition when occassions present themselves. The plan laid out for the dancers will make the organization of folk dances possible and desirable here.

    The Swedish traditions cannot be preserved by singing folk songs alone; neither will the old folk dances be no less effective as has lately been demonstrated in Sweden. In our ...

    Swedish
    II B 1 c 2, I C
  • Svenska Tribunen -- February 13, 1906
    [A Genuine Swedish Festival]

    The Swedish National Festival, held on Saturday, February 10 at the Auditorium, was a success in every respect. Our countrymen of Chicago were thoroughly interested in the program. The three thousand who attended the festival were enraptured from beginning to end.

    The Swedish folk dancers opened their program with a "Hambo", which they executed with grace and perfect tempo, and put the audience in an enthusiastically appreciative mood for the entire evening. All well-known and popular folk dances were presented.

    The folk dancers group, whose American tour included the Auditorium exhibition, is made up of six couples from as many sections of Sweden; each couple wearing the official costume of their respective sections.

    2

    While every dance was awarded wholehearted applause, the applause given "Vingakers Dansen" was so outstanding that the folk dancers were forced to present it a second time.

    As an additional attraction, the Swedish Ladies Quartette and the Harmony Male Chorus offered several well-chosen songs, both groups drawing such a volume of applause that they sang several encore numbers.

    For the benefit of our countrymen who found it impossible to attend the festival, we are pleased to announce that the touring Swedish Folk dancers will give a farewell performance at the south side Turner Hall on February 25. The Turner Hall being a much smaller hall than the Auditorium, we are sure of a sellout. We would advise all who desire to obtain tickets to do so before it is too late.

    The Swedish National Festival, held on Saturday, February 10 at the Auditorium, was a success in every respect. Our countrymen of Chicago were thoroughly interested in the program. The three ...

    Swedish
    II B 1 c 3, II B 1 c 2, II B 1 a
  • Svenska Tribunen -- February 27, 1906
    [Swedish National Dance Exhibition Delights Swedish Chicagoans]

    Skansen's National Dancers recently gave their farewell exhibition at the south side Turner Hall. As expected, the hall was far too small for this entertainment.

    The folk dances were presented in the same order as danced at the National Festival on February 10, at the Auditorium. They are: Hambo, Fjallnaspolska, Frykdalspolska, Daldans, Snurrebock, Schottis, Gottlandskadrilj, Ostgotapolska, Vingakersdans, Trekarlspolska, Oxdans, Halling, Vafva Vallman, Klappdans, and Skralat.

    Conservatively speaking, every number was awarded wild applause, and to all appearances, this presentation was an even greater success that their first one. The hit of this exhibition was the Oxdans (Ox Dance), which was applauded until an encore was given.

    2

    We wish this troupe of folk dancers continued success, and assure them of our heartfelt appreciation of their offering, one that awakened the fondest memories in the older people, and one which really set the younger ones to consider that Swedish traditions and culture are worth-while.

    Skansen's National Dancers recently gave their farewell exhibition at the south side Turner Hall. As expected, the hall was far too small for this entertainment. The folk dances were presented ...

    Swedish
    II B 1 c 2
  • Revyen -- January 26, 1907
    Dancing

    Playwright Poss Nielsen is inviting the public to an evening of entertainment Sunday, Jan. 27, at 7:30 o'clock, when he will demonstrate the aims and purposes of his, "School of Culture." Poss Nielsen's idea is that dancing is able to develop a person's personality. One of his pupils little Esther Mathiesen is going to demonstrate that effect by dancing "Pas" of the Minuet "Elverhoj." Mrs. Agnes Mathiesen will be at the piano.

    Professor Marinus Poulsen has composed a characteristic melody for Fiskerne by Nolger Drachmann which will be sung by Poss Nielsen. Also he will recite lines from a classic play. The affair will be held in Boyschou's Hall, North and Western Avenues.

    Playwright Poss Nielsen is inviting the public to an evening of entertainment Sunday, Jan. 27, at 7:30 o'clock, when he will demonstrate the aims and purposes of his, "School of ...

    Danish
    II A 3 d 2, II B 1 c 2