The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 28, 1876
    [Hans Von Buelow to Give Concerts]

    The concerts of the famous piano artist, Hans Von Bulow, will begin next Monday in McCormick's Hall. The program of the first concert will be compositions by Bach, Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Spohr, Rubinstein, Gomez, and Liszt. The singer, Miss Cronyn, who will appear at the concerts, is an eighteen-year old lady from Buffalo, the daughter of a physician. She has a pleasant voice and is an able artist.

    The concerts of the famous piano artist, Hans Von Bulow, will begin next Monday in McCormick's Hall. The program of the first concert will be compositions by Bach, Beethoven, Mendelssohn, ...

    German
    II A 3 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 07, 1876
    "Delusions of Grandeur."

    The pianist, Hans Von Bulow, has revelled in some impertinence before leaving Chicago. In very poor English he ridiculed the "Dutch". To give to his scorn a musical accompaniment, he then played the Marseillaise. He also published in the Times the Germanophobe English newspaper, a series of opinions concerning the Germans in America, opinions which are so insulting that the only possible answer should be directed to the seat of his pants.

    In his favor must be said that he is not responsible, but suffers from delusions of grandeur. By speaking with contempt of the "Dutch", he remains faithful to his past.

    2

    He is one of those German deserters, who licked the boots of the French Emperor. There is no fatherland for the confessors of the Wagner religion. He would never have dared to play the Marseillaise at the time that he a was a boot-licker of Louis Napoleon. That might have been dangerous.

    The pianist, Hans Von Bulow, has revelled in some impertinence before leaving Chicago. In very poor English he ridiculed the "Dutch". To give to his scorn a musical accompaniment, he ...

    German
    I C, II A 3 b
  • Chicago Tribune -- February 13, 1876
    Music.

    The recent Von Bulow season of concerts has left a bitter taste in the mouths of many of the German musicians of this city, and, as a consequence, the whole German world is in a fret and fume...when even the phlegmatic and philosophical "P. B." gets on the rampage, it may be taken as an indication that Germany is disturbed. He writes as follows:

    To the Editor of the Chicago Tribune:

    Von Bulow not satisfied with the laurels he has legitimately won as a great player, longed for still another distinction, so he made a speech, in which he stated that his countrymen, the "Dutch", demanded of him that he should play "Home Sweet Home", "Yankee Doodle", etc.

    2

    Since the Germans here pronounce this statement an unmitigated falsehood, Von Bulow should, in justice to himself, give the source whence he derived that information. It seems as if the only kind of criticism which agrees with the Doctor is unbounded admiration and adoration, "exquisite, beautiful, masterly, perfect", and so on. To himself his reading and interpretation are infallible. Those who admire indiscriminately are the connoisseurs, and those who dare to differ, the ignoramuses. If he settles among us, he will find the leveling process of our democracy slightly different from that which he pretends to discover in Bismarck's Empire. The charm of novelty will soon pass, and then he will be judged like an ordinary mortal. He is a magnificant player and yet the rhapsodical style of Liszt and the moderns is his proper sphere. Mr. "P. B." speaks of the abuse which Von Bulow has lavished upon his countrymen, which leads us to inquire what was the motive? Simply this:

    3

    Von Bulow discharged his orchestral conductor in Boston because the latter guzzled so much beer as to be unfit for his duties, which Von Bulow was wise in doing, and took occasion in his aggressive way to animadvent severely upon the use of beer as an element of musical success, which, perhaps, was injudicious. The German press of this city, with one exception, assailed him in the severest manner, long before he came here, and the clique was formed against him when he arrived.

    What the cliques are, "P. B." himself knows in his long experience. Hans Balatka, Otto Lob, Dr. Fuchs, and other numerous German leaders in this city could unfold a very interesting tale of what cliques have done for them. They know that cliques are the bane of German musical effort.

    We can only regret finding so old and accomplished a musician as " P. B." entering the lists against an artist who has reflected so much credit upon German art. An artist so modest that he has not even played any of his own compositions.

    The recent Von Bulow season of concerts has left a bitter taste in the mouths of many of the German musicians of this city, and, as a consequence, the whole ...

    German
    II A 3 b, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 19, 1876
    Pappenheim in Mc Cormick's Hall.

    Mrs. Eugenie Pappenheim will appear tonight in a great concert in McCormick's Hall with the members of the Grand Opera Company. The unusually flattering reception granted to the German prima donna by the Chicago public, is a proof that the artist has made a great impression. Mrs. Pappenheim is superior to all the other prima donnas and is surpassed only by Lucia and even not by her in all the roles.

    Hans Balatks will conduct the orchestra. The low prices will enable the poorer classes to attend the concert.

    Mrs. Eugenie Pappenheim will appear tonight in a great concert in McCormick's Hall with the members of the Grand Opera Company. The unusually flattering reception granted to the German prima ...

    German
    II A 3 b, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 20, 1876
    The Pappenheim Concert.

    To call the treatment to which the public was subjected last night in McCormick's Hall inconsiderate or to speak of Mrs. Pappenheim's conduct as artistic temperament, would put it very mildly. The manner in which she expressed her disapproval because her name and recent success did not draw a full house is so revolting that we are unable to find the right word to define such conduct.

    The attendance was probably so small on account of the terrific heat. Only 162 seats were occupied when the concert was supposed to begin. The few persons present had to suffer from the lack of ventilation and used their programs as fans. After the audience had waited and perspired for over 40 minutes, Mr. Balatka, the orchestra leader appeared to notify the public that Mrs. Pappenheim was not well and was thus unable to sing.

    The idea of wanting to deceive the public with such an excuse is absurd. Of course, Mrs. Pappenheim was not ill at all. She was completely dressed up and when she realized after 20 minutes that the auditorium would not be filled, she lost her temper. The management is not entirely responsible for this event.

    To call the treatment to which the public was subjected last night in McCormick's Hall inconsiderate or to speak of Mrs. Pappenheim's conduct as artistic temperament, would put it very ...

    German
    II A 3 b, IV
  • Der Westen -- May 21, 1876
    German Opera.

    The second act of Weber(s "Freischutz" will be given tonight in Hooley's Opera House, with Mrs. Pappenheim as Agathe. She will also appear as Leonore in the second and fourth acts of "Troubadour". The sale of tickets was very good yesterday. This proves, that the public although still resentful due to the lack of consideration shown last Friday, does not wish nevertheless to miss the wonderful singing of Mrs. Pappenheim. Today's representation promises to be a very excellent one indeed.

    The second act of Weber(s "Freischutz" will be given tonight in Hooley's Opera House, with Mrs. Pappenheim as Agathe. She will also appear as Leonore in the second and fourth ...

    German
    II A 3 b, III H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 22, 1876
    The German Opera.

    Yesterday's presentation of the German Opera Company must have satisfied the most severe critics and must be considered as the climax of this year's musical season. The choice of the opera park was a happy one, because it gave Mrs. Mappenheim an opportunity to reveal not only her talent as a singer but her dramatic abilities as well. Her voice can hardly be surpassed and we believe that the majority of the public considers her to be superior to Lucca.

    Her main triumph was as Leonore, where she was magnificent as a singer and as a dramatic artist as well.

    The attendance was rather small and did not do justice to the artistic representation.

    Yesterday's presentation of the German Opera Company must have satisfied the most severe critics and must be considered as the climax of this year's musical season. The choice of the ...

    German
    II A 3 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 16, 1876
    A Great Loss

    It will be sad news for the music loving people of Chicago to learn that Mr. H. Balatka, musical conductor, has decided to leave the city where he has spent 16 years and to go to St. Louis.

    Those who have witnessed the energetic efforts of Mr. Balatka to give the public a better and finer understanding of music, will be deeply grieved by this announcement. Chicago has not at present another conductor with the abilities of Mr. Balatka. The greatest loss is suffered by the "Liederkranz" as Mr. Balatka had such a prominent part in its organization and development. Mr. Balatka goes to St. Louis to become music instructor at a great school there and to become director of the singers' club, "Arion of the West".

    It will be sad news for the music loving people of Chicago to learn that Mr. H. Balatka, musical conductor, has decided to leave the city where he has spent ...

    German
    IV, II A 3 b, II B 2 f, III B 2, II B 1 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 09, 1876
    Concert in the North Side Turner Hall.

    When a few months ago, Hans Balatka gave his last concert in the North Side Turner Hall, he expressed hope for a beautiful future for music in Chicago. Formerly concerts were neglected because of circumstances and of an incomprehensible indifference of the public. Only after they had stopped, did people realize what they had lost and express the desire to have them organized anew. Their wish was put into execution. Mr. Clauder, a musician of talent, assembled the old members again and thus once more Sundays will be enlivened. The Turner Hall has thus once more become the center of attraction on the North Side.

    Yesterday's concert was well attended. The most pleasing number was Bilse's "Victoria Waltz." Mr. Clauder is anxious to furnish always something new and good. He needs, of course, the support of the public and it is to be hoped that it will not fail him.

    When a few months ago, Hans Balatka gave his last concert in the North Side Turner Hall, he expressed hope for a beautiful future for music in Chicago. Formerly concerts ...

    German
    II A 3 b, III B 2, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 18, 1876
    About the Sunday Concerts. (Mailed In)

    To the Editor of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung:

    The terrible tobacco smoke which filled the Turner Hall from A to Z, was sufficient to so permeate our clothes that even today they still smell. Such a smoke drives any lady and any gentleman away from the concert. Is it not possible for the Germans to abstain a few hours from smoking for the sake of the ladies? No wonder so few ladies attend these concerts.

    The German public does not only want good music but also a decent recreation place - a recreation place where one listens to good music more on famille than en canaille, where one gladly brings one's wife and daughter. As the concerts,are conducted now, they certainly will not last.

    A Music and Family Friend.

    To the Editor of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung: The terrible tobacco smoke which filled the Turner Hall from A to Z, was sufficient to so permeate our clothes that even today ...

    German
    II A 3 b, III B 2